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FOX
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am PST
quote people are still gathering outside of nelson mandela's house in johannesburg. this is video shot earlier this morning. tomorrow, a public memorial service will be held in a soccer stadium that seats 95,000 people. then nelson mandela's body will lie in state in a government building in pretoria from wednesday through friday and then on sunday, nelson mandela will be buried in the remote village that he grew up in. >>> 7:16. today, south africa's
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
for nelson mandela. >> he passed on peacefully. >> near midnight in johannesb g johannesburg's president announced the death. world leaders joined forces. in america our first black president spoke of his shehero,e first black president. >> he no longer belongs to us, but by the ages. >> to his county he represented forgiveness. >> you have a limited type of to stay on earth. you must try to use that period for the purpose of transforming the country in what you desire it to be. a democratic nonracial, non-sexist country. that is a great task. >> hello, i'm antonio mora, welcome to a special edition of "consider this". the man known as madiba said courage was not the absence of deed. born to a royal tribal family naming him rolihlahla dalibhunga, which means trouble maker, he lived up to his name. after studying law he dedicated himself to apartheid. a system imposed on the black african. nelson mandela was arrested in sentenced to life in prison. he spent 28 years behind bars, mostly in a tiny cell on robin island near cape town. nelson mandela's brutal imprisonment led to tub
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
, freedom fighter, hero for change and hope. the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> he no longer belongs to u he belongs to the ages. >> nelson mandela said it, "it always seems impossible until it's done", for this towering revolutionary who spent decades in prison for believing in freedom and equality nothing is impossible. the world is a better place because of him. the former south african president died at his home. he was 95. outside crowds gathered all evening and in the morning and have been gathered four hours to mourn his passing, but to rejoice in a remarkable life. scenes are incredible, people dancing and singing. they are paying tribute to him. they are doing the same in new york. a famed venue in harlem, and the marr key honours nelson mandela. morgan radford is here in the studio. >> talk about the life of nelson mandela, and what he means to so many people. >> nelson mandela is a symbol of hope, freedom, a time in this world, and in our country and theirs when equality did not s did not reign free and is a symbol for young americans growing up understandin
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am EST
are watching al jazeera's special coverage of the death of nelson mandela. people all over the world mourning the death of the man they called madiba. these are the feeds coming live from johannesburg, outside the home of the south african antiapartheid hero. this is where he decide last night surrounded by his family. crowds of we'll wishers have been gathering, dancing, swimming, praising his life. they are there to celebrate his achievements and mourn his passing. nelson mandela, south africa's first black president was 95, dying in the company of his family after a long battle against lung infections. let's listen to what some of these people had to say gathered outside his home. >> i'm very sad. i met him when i was young. i grew up with him. i was very sad. i'm not happy that he gets to rest in piece. what he did for the country. i was telling my friend now, that if i was him i wouldn't be friends with him. i wouldn't be together. . >> obviously i'm shocked and sadden. it's hurtful. i was born in 1994. he fought for everything. i wouldn't be able to be here around my family. i
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm PST
quote i don't know whether you are away. >> i was, yeah. >> 95 years old. nelson mandela -- i spent some time in south africa. he was a communist, this man. he was a communist. all right? but he was a great man. what he did for his people was stunning. the sacrifices that he made. he could have repudiated and got out of that prison. he wouldn't do it. he was a great man. but he was a communist. so, but i would never attack
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2013 5:30am PST
inspire generations. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. thank for joining us on "france ." people around the world are gathering to mourn the loss of nelson mandela. this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela, who was both inspirational and controversial. and ray brown looks back at the life of nelson mandela. born in the former trance state territory on july 18, 1918, nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief like his father. instead he became a lawyer and the first -- in the first lack legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the congress in 19 -- in -- in his practice, he was exposed to the inhumanity's of apartheid on a daily basis. he decided to fight back. opting for nonviolence as a strategy. he was first arrested in 1956 and prosecuted on treason charges, which were later dropped. nancyars later he married winnie.s when he -- >> there are many people who feel it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against the government. on these savage attacks. on unarmed, defenseless peopl
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
for the one hour special edition of nightly news on nelson mandela. it is 3:30 friday morning in front of the home of nelson mandela. n of freedom who changed the world. >> in the name of the heavenly father of our people -- >> tonight the world reacts to the death of nelson mandela at the age of 95. >> he's now at peace. >> on our broadcast tonight, remembering the man and his legacy. "nightly news" begins now. >>> the death of nelson mandela from nbc news headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. to those who loved him, he was the hope and the light of the world. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. while this news, this announcement was inevitable, it has still come as a shock to the world with the realization that a beacon of freedom and moral authority and dignity and forgiveness is now gone. a former prisoner turned nobel laureate. late today local time in south africa after visible worry and activity outside the home, south african president zuma went on live it's and broke the sad news to his country. >> our beloved n
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
and to the citizen of the nation me loved. >> allen has more on nelson mandela's life. >> he was a prisoner and a president. a violent revolutionary and a moderate reformer. he was the face of change in turbulent south africa. his smile and his strength, power weapons in the fight for racial many people don't see it, against the government that applied. was on these savage attacks. leave south africa away from decades of racial separation and minority, white rule, was born in manage fella grew up in a rural roadless area near born to tribal royalty, he was adopted and raised by a chiefton after his father's death when he was just nine. he was the first in his y to attend school, where a missionary teacher gave him the first name nelson. his political activism began in college. join as boycott to school. he moved to johann studies law, and joins the african national congress, a political party and resistence moving fighting the segregation that was so deeply divisive. that passed laws taking segregation to an extreme. >> celebrated 3 million people to black homelands. denying their
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
people. >>> tonight the world reacts os the death of nelson mandela at the age of 95. >> he is now at peace. >> on our broadcast tonight, remembering the man and his leg si. "nightly news" beginnow. >> announcer: the death of nelson mandela from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. for millions who lived him and the modern country he formed and >>> in the modern country he formed and the light of the world, he was the hope around the world, nelson mandela died at the age of 95. while this news was inevitable, it has still come as a shock to the world a realization a be don of forgiveness is gone. a nobel prisoner turned nobel laurea laureate, for so many years, a giver of peace. late this afternoon after visible activity and worry outside the mandela home, south african president went on live television and broke the news to his country. >> fellow south african, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has died. >> the news was followed by president obama at the white house. >>
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
of nelson mandela. >>> nelson mandela, dead at the age of 95. >> doreen gentzler is covering this story for us. doreen? >> jim and pat, we are learning this news in the last 15 minutes or so. this story is still developing, the reaction to it and everything. of course, there is quite a few people in washington, long time friends and supporters of nelson mandela's. as we told you, the current south african president announced mandela died at the age of 95. we have a look at the life and legacy of the leader. >> reporter: nelson mandela was the face of reconciliation and a new beginning for south africa. brian is the human rights attorney in south africa part of the movement prior to his release from prison in 1991. reflected on the role he played once he was released. it was a time celebrated around the world. inside south africa, it was a precarious time. >> immediate contribution was to reach out and speak about reconciliation. >> i cherish the idea of south africa where all south africans are equal. >> far right wing politicians are prodding them. mandela convinced the supporter
Al Jazeera America
Dec 10, 2013 4:00am EST
of nelson mandela. >> hello, i'm here at the f.n.b. stadium in soweto, where the world is paying its respects to nelson mandela. >> hello, live from doha withage of the memorial service. more than 70 powerful leaders of the world are attending. some will be making speeches. people have come from far and wide to take part. >> we've been singing the whole night. >> right now tens of thousands of people, including some of the most powerful in the world are inside a stadium in johannesburg. they are there for a memorial service for nelson mandela and these are pictures live from the venue where the event is getting underway. the seats are filling up quickly. more than 70 world leaders are at the event with speeches expected from the south african president, jacob zuma, u.s. president obama, and u.s. vernal -- certainly ban ki-moon - just a few of the speakers. the services are taking place at the f.n.b. stadium, built for the football world cup which south africa opened in 2010, and where nelson mandela had his last appearance. the stadium has room for 95,000, many dignitaries and heads
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 12:35am EST
" nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and memories. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him. >> to celebrities and mostly ordinary citizens of the world, an outpouring of love and mourning. we are live in johannesburg. alex? >> good evening, dan. a new day has dawned here in south africa. a profound sense of loss has swept across this country. but what's remarkable are the scenes of celebration that we see. south africans going out in the streets. >> when the news broke tonight of mandela's death, south africans flocked to his
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 3:30pm PST
furse from johannesburg, where people have gathered outside the home of nelson mandela to pay their respects. >>> donna brazil is here, john king is here and era him rasool is here. john, you were there in almost 20 years ago when nelson mandela was inaugurated. tell us what it was like. >> it remains the most powerful moment i have ever seen. before then, the vice president al gore mentioned the delegation. fidel castro was walking out of the hall, ga davi, many of the african leaders, some quite controversial to the leadership of the united states, were walking out, and then president-elect mandela, just moments he was having brief meetings. after he met with the vice president, there were a few reporters, and he shuffled over and very quietly and shook our hands and asked how we were doing. on this days when, that's who he was, this quiet dignity and grace. i want to show this. the vips were given this. and some of us hung around. >> you were working for the associated press. >> at the time. this is the new stamp they issued that day, commemorating the new president, but there wa
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am PST
nelson mandela, who survived 27 years in prison, and led south africa out of the nightmare of apartheid, and beacones to serve as a for anyone who values justice and equality. his battle against retaliation set a standard to which all of us should aspire. belafonte,is harry maxine waters and larry king. thank you for joining me on my tribute to nelson mandela, starting now. >> there is a saying dr. king said, there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life doing the right thing. we are halfway to completely eliminate hunger and we have a lot of work to do. spending over $1 billion to fight hunger in the u.s.. if we were together we can stamp this out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations, from viewers like you. thank you. ♪ tavis: please to be joined now by harry belafonte, a longtime friend of president and della. an advocate for justice and equality in his own right. i met with him in new york city to talk about nelson mandela's great contributions to the world. envious and jealous of you for so many reasons, not the least of which is that handsom
CBS
Dec 10, 2013 3:10am PST
sitting here coming together to say farewell to nelson mandela. this is a rainbow nation. this is the nation that he fought and said he was going to put his life on the line for. it is hard to believe that just a couple of decades ago people thought this country might go into a civil war. because of the politics of nelson mandela, it called for healing and it pulled this country together so that when you look around today and see all fees faces coming together to say farewell to him, you know there is a lot more to do in south africa. they have come a long, long way. a lot of thanks to nelson mandela. >> as we listen to the music also, the list of speakers to follow include president obama, then followed by the president of brazil, the vice president of china, the president of india and president raul castro of cuba and the keynotes which will be delivered by the president of south africa and as we watch this genuine musical appreciation. as we watch this musical event of what nelson mandela meant to south africa. >>> talk about the list of speakers. they were talking about chance enc
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2013 6:30am EST
>> was a source of inter inspiration throughout south america. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: he stands as an example and a key reference for all of us. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: the stoic, firm, patient, enduring prisons and suffering. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: 40 enlightened strength and determination he showed in his fight. train -- at 8 >> translator: for his deep commitment to justice. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: above all for his moral and ethical superiority. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: he was able to turn the quest for truth and forgiveness into the pillars of national reconciliation and building of a new south africa. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: greatness and humanism as was the case of nelson mandela. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: this goes beyond the national border, inspired men and women. with independence and social justice. [speaking in native tongue] train change she left many lessons not only for his beloved and african continent but for all who seek freedom, social justice and world peace. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: like the south african who mourned, nelson mandela would be a chance, proudly carry african blood in our veins and celebrate the example of this great leader who belongs to the pantheon of humankind. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: bowed down before the memory of nelson mandela. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i would like perhaps michele and family members, all south africans, our deepest feelings of pain and sorrow. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: long lived nelson mandela forever. [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, president dilma rosseff from brazil. welcome all of us. we now call upon our next speaker, who is the vice president, we went out --li wan chao of china. [cheers and applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: dear members of the mandela family, leaders from around the world, ladies and gentlemen cammed dear friends. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: we have traveled from different parts of the world today to more in the passing of nelson mandela, founding president of the new south africa. and be had of li yuanchao and then in the mud the chinese government and people i wish to express deep condolences and a high tribute to this powering figure born on the african continent, whose bright smile we remember fondly. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: nelson mandela was the extraordinary funding father of the new south africa, debt needs of strenuous effort, he led the people of south africa to victory in the fight against apartheid making historic contributions to the first of a rainbow nation and the solid foundation for long-term growth of his country. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: nelson mandela was the pride of the african people. he had fought for the liberation of african nations, the big city of the average people, he never disavowed the unity of all african countries and move forward with the world. he had dedicated his entire life to the development and progress of africa. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: nelson mandela was no friend a -- an old friend of the chinese people and a household name in china, one of the founding fathers of china's all africa relations nelson mandela had committed himself to china/south africa friendship and shine out/africa cooperation with great passion. the chinese people will always cherish the memory of his important contribution to china, south africa friendship and relations. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: we are saddened by a loss of such a great friend. at the same time we are heartened qc heat will be carried forward. the south african people have made great achievements, as the major emerging countries south africa is playing a constructive role on the international stage and upholding the legitimate development of developing countries. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: made the deceased rest in peace while living move on with their lives. the best way to remember and commemorate nelson mandela is his spirit and carry forward his legacy. we believe that under the leadership of jacob zuma and the government of south africa the south african people will continue to make big fights forward along national rejuvenation and development. china stands ready to work with south africa to deepen china/south african benefits to that two countries and two people and make public contribution to the noble cause of world peace and development. >> finally i would like to say the great man has left, but nelson mandela's spirit, thank you all. [speaking in native tongue] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [speaking in native tongue] >> we welcome his excellency, the president of niger. the prime minister of lebanon. has excellent sleep, that his excellency, the prime minister of south sudan. and the prime minister and secretary general of the ruling party, from rwanda. his excellency, president of chad. and his excellency, the president of zambia. his excellency, the president of ireland. his excellency, the president of tunisia. his excellency, the president of guyana. and his excellency, the president and her royal highness, the prince in spain. honorable prime minister from jamaica. his excellency, the president of finland. his excellency, the president of senegal. his excellency, the president from malawi. his excellency, francois jhol d hollande of france. and his excellency, the president of doghana. and his excellency, the president on the stage, his excellency, the president of germany. his excellency, prime minister of ethiopia. his excellency, the president of mexico. his excellency, as you probably know, his excellency, the president of the european parliament. and his excellency, the president of beirut from the republic of slovenia. the president, his excellency, prime minister from the republic of korea. at this point, would like to call upon our neighbor, the president of namibia. >> your excellency. the republic of south africa. the government -- brothers and sisters, today we are one extended family united by the africans soil. a towering giant who gave his life to humanity because he was selfless. he believed in the worth of every human being. especially humanity. because he believed in one united south africa. he shows forgiveness over retribution, reconciliation and peace. and south africa but it took us in namibia, but he was prominent brother. for those compatriots -- some who are here with us today -- he is here. he was an inspiration for the people of namibia in our struggle for freedom. and a symbol of fundamental human rights. peace and justice, not only for the people of south africa but for humanity itself. to celebrate his life and the fulfillment of the ideals he sacrificed. to our brothers and sisters of south africa, which shared the strength in the common struggle against apartheid. let us continue to gather, the struggle for problems for our people, guided by the principles of democracy, quality and justice. we wish you strength and we thank you for sharing. the ceremonies. a unique and special gift for the world's. and never before gotten and it will live forever. i thank you. >> we continue with our program. now it is my honor and pleasure before we call the president of india, that the wait until you finish. right up there. and roberto. [speaking in native tongue] >> made the spirit of nelson mandela, long live nelson mandela. we are coming to a close. we can see that the rain is not abating. we are not going to keep everyone here for too long because you have been here for quite a while. i ask that you just be patient. we have three more speakers to speak and the president will also be grieved because he knows you have been here for so long. and there it is. let us cooperate. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> he was a leader of the movement. let us send him up with greater discipline. let us demonstrate to ourselves and all that we are disciplined. with that, i request the speakers give their input and as i said, we have three, the president of india, the president of cuba, then we are done. all in one place. let us be disciplined. i now call upon the president of india. thank you very much. >> president and the onjacob z. resident jacob zupresident jaco modern community. on behalf of the people of india, i join you in paying homage -- there is a band of their. i know that you are very enthusiastic. i want you to play your musical later when i call upon you to play. please put your instruments down now. the brass band, you will play your wonderful music in a little while. i know you play good music. please be patient with us. we only have three more speakers. we are in a celebratory mood and we want to celebrate nelson mandela's life. put the music down, let the president of india continue please. thank you. >> it is with the deepest reverence that i on behalf of the government of india, the people of india join the nation in paying homage to the president nelson mandela. for indy at the passing ia the mandela represents the departure of a great soul, sacrifice and tradition. gay an impossible goal for his people and the world. we in india, we will always be deep in laws for our people. to us nelson mandela was history. .. principles that they are following or it is no wonder that we in india feel great sentiment for the people of this great country, south africa. we stand by you. we share, we have no doubt that we are that the great inanity of our century, who taught the remaining of forgiveness and reconciliation and secured south africa, a building a truly wonderful mission. thank you, ladies and gentlemen. [choosers]] thank you, mr. president. we now will get an address from a tiny island, an island of people who liberated us. who fought for our liberation. the people of cuba. we will now receive a speech from comrade raul castro who is coming to talk to us. >> thank you, jacob zuma. for nelson mandela. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: president jacob zuma, for nelson mandela, distinguished dignitary. .. [speaking in native tongue] [ >> i can hold this, okay. sorry. alongside the struggle, nelson mandela has met his people in the battle to open the way to new south africa, a united south africa in its quest for happiness, eat quality and the well-being of children bent on overcoming, and racial segregation. >> [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: setting an example of integrity and perseverance, nelson mandela with efforts of pottery, reducing the quality and create opportunities for all. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: nelson mandela has set out an example to latin america and the caribbean which are currently moving toward unity and integration for the benefit of their people. on the basis of respect for diversity and convinced that it is only through dialogue and cooperation that the services can be resolved in a civilized relationship established between those who think differently. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: as nelson mandela's life features us, only a concerted effort of all nations will empower humanity to the anonymous challenges that today threaten its existence. [speaking in native tongue] respect >> translator: a country born in the struggle for independence and the abolition of slavery and whose children have african blood in their veins had the privilege of fighting and building the african nation. >> translator: [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: we shall never forget nelson mandela's moving homage to our moving struggle in the location of his visit to our country on july 26, 1991, he said, and i quote, the cuban people have a special place in the heart of the people of africa. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i remember his bond with fidel castro, a symbol of the fraternal relations between africans and cubans, he said, quote, nelson mandela will not go down in history for the 27 consecutive years he was incarcerated without ever renouncing his ideas. he will go down in history because he was capable of cleaning up his soul from the poison that this would have brought to bear and his generosity and wisdom which at the time of victory allowed him to lead with great talent his heroic people knowing south africa could not be built on hatred and vengeance. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: to our great colleague nelson mandela and the heroic people of south africa. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> thank you, president castro. we thank you for all the support and help that we continue to get from the people of cuba during our years of struggle and our country's continues -- continue to be joined at the hip in areas of development in a number of ways and help in many other areas. we continue to recognize heads of government who are here. his excellency, mr. abdul ahmed from bangladesh. is excellency, president kinyata from kenya is also here. the president of venezuela is also here. his excellency, the prime minister of italy is here. his excellency, president hussain from pakistan is here. his excellency, the president of australia, his excellency, prime minister andrew goldberg as well from norway is here. his excellency, the president of georgia is here and his excellency, acting president bordeaux from argentina. friends, visitors, it now gives me pleasure to request their president of the republic of south africa, president jacob zuma, come forward and address us, in paying tribute to our departed leader, nelson mandela. [cheers and applause] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] at 8 [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [she is and applause] cyril ranaphosa[speaking in native to [speaking in native tongue] >> faith in government. former heads of state and government, representatives of government,s of the international organization, in all regions of the world, traditional leaders, religious leaders, political organizations, representatives of political parties, and eminent persons, a friends of south africa all over the world's. in milan dubai, south africans, being a popular song. nelson mandela, we sing that, he is one of a kind. no one fights like him. nelson mandela, nelson mandela. [cheers and applause] this song is one of the most accurate descriptions of this icon, the founding -- democratic south africa. the old separation movement in the continent. his passing meant an unprecedented outpouring across the world. yet this administration, admiration and celebration. everyone has had a nelson mandela moment. let us begin before by thinkian all heads of state international delegations, we extend our deepest gratitude to for the message for condolences that we continue to receive. be nelson mandela family, south african people and the african continent feels stronger today because we are being completed by millions throughout the world. .. the people and their leaders in an effort to halt the forward march, ordinary forms of organizations would be rendered impossible, but the spirit of the people cannot be quenched until victory is won. the cycle became much about life. and the rest has changed. in the 1940s, the long walk to freedom, it became a volunteer in chief during the campaign in the 1950s and became the first commander-in-chief of the amc armed wing in the early 1950s. he paid dearly for his beliefs and actions through imprisonment. in 1962, quote, i was amazed by the law, not because of what i had done but because of what i stood for, because of what my conscience -- arrested and sentenced to life imprisonment during the trial in 1954 and the south african people spoke about him in her tones out of fear. the apartheid government, they would have been delivered from thinking about it. a powerful name nelson mandela lived long, it continues to inspire our people every single day from inside, it demonstrates unique leadership, negotiations with the enemy, also negotiated for the release of prisoners, follow his own relief, is relief from prison on the eleventh in nineteen 90, one of the most remarkable and moving moments in world history. the world came to a standstill watching this tall, imposing figure walking out into a world he had left behind 27 years before. the enormous emotion we felt on that day. downtrodden people who had been dehumanized in the land, we saw signs that freedom would be obtained in their time. to help us through a difficult procedure from apathy to a free democratic society. the bumpy road to a historic session, there are many times that it brought our nation back from the brink. 1992, the killing of the leader of our people in 1993, a sign of the occasion when our country had a long walk to freedom, to the heart of government. it is at this time, a sense of calm, brought us back on the road to freedom, south africa's first -- the leadership that he displayed. today, international human rights day, we celebrate the man of peace, up is the 20th anniversary, on the tenth of december in 1993. this freedom flight, the amc, resorted to arm the intransigence of the apartheid regime which responded to violence, spending and deep tension and simple demand. for south africa, the arms struggle was inevitable. this was a means to an end but not an end in its self. also evidence in world peace in the continent, people of burundi and democracy today because of the seeds of peace planted by nelson mandela. the national elections on the 20 seventh of april 1994, an unprecedented number in government, and and and persons from around of the world's standing up on our shores so this inauguration, and the free and democratic -- the whole world to pay tribute for south africa. no one like nelson mandela, he was one of a kind. the world speaks fondly of reconciliation, non-racial listen during his presidency. during this time in 1964, spend half a century fighting a situation, it did not change that policy. non racialism and reconciliation during this tenure as president of the republic, in france, speaking at the adoption of a new constitution of the republic in 1962, since 1996, all lined the society. it said, and i quote, let us give recognition by building a future place on equality and social justice. let us make national unity by recognizing with respect and joy the culture and religion of south africa, tolerance for one another to create fiscal conditions which give space to all of us to find and flourish, above all, let us rent together for homelessness, illiteracy, hunger and disease. would challenges facing the young south africa. and uniting the nation. and frustrations of the oppressed and reminding us of our common humanity. that is our standard racial families. and the minority. and high expectations and the majority. and the promise of democracy would not be met overnight. and delay one trigger. we all agreed with him. and hesitate to speak his mind when it was necessary to do so regardless of how the words may be in. some of whom have experienced this. realizing the power of sports to concord, and embrace out paprika's 1995 conditions. during the sprint of jersey at a time when it was march or july by the majority of the population. this would be a hallmark of his presidency. his visit would bring each time they face formidable opponents, promoting reconciliation, also laid the foundation their transformation as well as reconciliation. he knew that reconciliation, transformation and reconstruction. and there is literature, the new democratically elected government, addressing historical injustices created new institutions, and on principles of non-citizens. closed on the floor, removed in books. and democracy. and the legal framework of apathy and transformation of institutions led to the physical improvement of economic conditions of millions of people. that run and cries of the presidency. nelson mandela laid the foundation for our country's successful -- one of the greatest sketches. and during his retirement. and gave birth to mandela days, a global call to action, mobilizing people to spend time helping those in need. in november of 2009, united nations general assembly declared the eighteenth of july nelson mandela international they. each year on the eighteenth of july the world comes together to celebrate mandela day, representing his selfless sacrifice and betterment of others. he was one of a kind. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> friends saying nelson mandela was one of the kind we also remember he believes in collective literature and never wanted to be viewed as a messiah or a saint. he emphasized that all his achievements were derived from working with the collective from home in his own words the men and women were more capable than he was. south africa that you see today is a reflection of many others like him to sacrifice their lives for a free nation. with that, we remain truly grateful to his peers, the original kumble, [speaking in native tongue] and countless others who left an indelible mark in the history of the struggle. friends, today nelson mandela is no more. he lives behind a nation that loved him dearly. he leaves a continent that is truly proud to call him an african. he leaves the people of the world who embraced him as their own icon. most importantly, he leaves behind a deeply entrenched legacy of freedom, human rights and democracy in our country. in his honor, we commit ourselves to continue building a nation based on blood democratic values of human dignity, equality and freedom. united in our diversity, we will continue working to build a nation free of poverty, hunger, homelessness and inequality. as the african continent led by the african union, we will continue working to fulfill his desire for a better africa and more just, peaceful and equitable world. tomorrow, our people will accompany him on this last journey to the state of government, the union prison in pretoria where his body will lie in state for three days. i have the honor today to announce the union prison and the theater where he was operating as president in 1994 and where his body will lie in state, with the effects from today, call b nelson mandela amphitheater. [cheers and applause] >> this is a fitting tribute to mcmahon 2 turned it from a symbol of racism and oppression to one of peace, unity, democracy and progress. comrades and friends, we extend yet again our deepest condolences. the children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and the entire extended family. [speaking in native tongue] >> our father has run the good race. it declared in his own words in 1994, he said, quote, death is something inevitable. when a man doing his duty to his people, his country, he can rest in peace. i believe i made that effort and that is why i will sleep for eternity. [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] >> let's embrace our father and our hero. thank you very much. .. knows that the lord will take away from your head today. an infant their kids and elisha got to him and elijah, i pray that the lord has sent me to jericho. and site as the sole leave, i will not, so they came to jericho and sounded out the proper -- jericho came to eliza and said to him, know that the lord will take away, on the outside, i know it. and eliza said to him, the lord has sent me to draw -- to jordan and as the lord gives and the sole gives, and they too when john. 50 men went, and they too sauna and jordan. and rented to get there the workouts and divided. so they too went over the ground and it came to pass they went on. and they were both there and eli show went up to heaven and eliza cried my father, the chariot of israel, he saw him no more. it took all of his old clothes and branded them and took up the mention of elijah, that said from him. and took the men of elijah and fell from it and said where is the lord of eliza? and all so he elijah went over. and jericho saw him, they said the spirit of elijah on elijah and they came and followed themselves underground before him. this is the word of god. ♪ ♪
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
them to you right hire. now it's time for the last word. >>> nelson mandela told his biographer men come and go, i have come, and i will go when my time comes. nelson mandela's time came today. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. i am your servant. i don't come to you as a leader. >> nelson mandela has departed this earth at the age of 95. >> the founding president has departed. >> the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not their fears. >> na is the man the world has been waiting to see, his first public appearance in nearly three decades. >> the basic issue is the demand of one person, one vote. >> nelson mandela has become a philosophier king, setting out his vision of what he thinks the future of south africa should be. >> prison is just not a place. >> we will likely not see the likes of nelson mandela again to make decisions by love, not by hate, to strife for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> it is not the individuals that matter. i am your ser vant
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 1:00pm EST
>> announcer: this is al jazeera. ♪ >>> hello welcome to the news hour, in doha, i'm adrian finnegan with the continuing coverage of the life and death of nelson mandela. south africans remember the man who lead them out of white-only rule. >>> i'm barbara in london, remembering mandela in europe. the statesman who touched a generation. [ gunfire ] >>> in other news, france s more troops to the central african republic a day after violence left more than a hundred people dead. a cash for work scheme is winning praise for cleanup after typhoon haiyan. >>> we begin this news hour then with the dae of nelson mandela. the president of south africa addressed the country to reveal details of theno carrierringrin0 [ technical difficulties ] >> and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. in the coming days they will honor his legacy and memory as they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >> so the state funeral as you said next sunday december 15th. south africa won't have seen a state occasion like it. and with so many world leaders flying in, it is likely to be a logistical nightmare. >> yes, it is. but they have no choice but to make it work, and they have been playing for a long time. nelson mandela was 95 years old, and he became sicker and sicker, so people knew this day was coming, people were planning this, so most people would expect the government had soming kind of plan in place and the plan will work. to the average people, though, for them, i think it's just how they are going to remember nelson mandela. for the parents here with children, they say they want to bring their children here, because they want their children to remember who nelson mandela was. and for some they don't even know who nelson mandela was. the young ones don't understand what he did for this country. and by bringing their children here, they are hoping their kids will learn and spread the message of peace and reconciliation and tolerance. >> all right. let's here now from tony leon, the former leader of the opposition democratic alliance, mandela's political foe. >> i often, you know, used to think about, well, is this man an angel or a bit of a [ inaudible ]. the answer is probably a bit of both. because he -- he knew his opponents weak spot and he knew how to seduce you with amazing amount of charm and persuasion to get the position that he wanted and if you stood up to him, as i had to do sometimes, he never seemed to regard that as a particular front, and i think that the way mandela operated certainly was present in the anc, was to provide influence people that he was on the right coarse. and if you weren't persuaded that was fine as well. so i always think of him as someone who didn't know his opposition as a club or a shield, he used it to try to unite the country. at our first meeting after he became president and i was elected leader of party in may 1994. he asked me to have breakfast in cape town, and he said, you know, toni, the opposition must hold up a mirror to the government. and we might not always like what we see in it, but that is a democracy. and he was pretty true to that. if you [ inaudible ] on certain toes of his organization, he was none too happy, but i think in the main he lived up to the ideals that he set out for the >> nelson mandela leaves a lasting legacy across the africa continent. let's hear from malcolm who has been speaking to a uganda journalist. >> we are outside of uganda's sports stadium. it was built in 1997 and it was named after nelson mandela. mandela visited uganda on several occasions, the first time was in 1990, just months after he had been released from prison. this man worked as a journalist in uganda for many years. >> it was euphoric. it was every single person in the country could tell that there was something in the country that had never been there before, that was nelson mandela. >> what in your view was nelson mandela's legacy? >> that person who had any other means of survival could fight the racism in this country, spend 27 years in prison and come back and not revenge on the people that emprisoned him, that i think for me that [ inaudible ] should not happen if we follow the legacy of what nelson mandela stood for. >> about half of the current population wasn't even born when nelson mandela was in power, but his ideas, visions and legacy live on. >> nicholas is in the capitol where people also revere mandela. >> this is one of the main arteries here, and it is named after nelson mandela. this road leads to this building, the national assembly. it's more than a symbol. it's a tribute to those who look for peace and dialogue before violence and conflict. wh nelson mandela came here in 1962 for the first time. and he came to get support - support -support -- [ technical difficulties ] >> here he is revered just like everywhere else in the world. he came here and went straight to an aland where slaves were taken to the americas, and that's where we were told he stayed in one of the holding cells alone and wept. and that resinated to the people here. today here like everywhere else in the world is a day of mourning and remembrance. >>> many world leaders have been giving their reaction. here are some of those. >> when he was released from prison it gave me a sense of >> we must carry so that [ inaudible ]. >> and we are not likely to see another of his kind for a long time to come. >> he also made us understand that we can change the world. we can change the world by changing attitudes, by changing perceptions. >> translator: he was a great leader who fought with strong will to eliminate apartheid. >> participate nelson mandela lived an troeshgsd their life in a very ordinary way. >> translator: it's really a very big shock for us. i compare him to a big [ inaudible ], a great tree under which everyone takes shelter. >> nelson mandela was convinced that hatred and are venn j cannot make the world a better place. >> one man [ inaudible ] force has shown he is stronger than all armies. >> tonight one of the brightest lights of our world has gone out. [ applause ] ♪ >>> well, as we continue to remember nelson mandela, we want to hear from you. if you have any pictures of yourself with mandela, or personal memories that you would like to share, please drop us at line. we'll share your stories and many others throughout the week. ♪ >>> the dno carrierringringno c0 >>> but that could be jeopardized. al jazeera reports now. >> it's a lifeline for those living hand to mouth. government subsidized ration shops like this across the country, help the poor buy affordable basics. without this help, people like this man would be unable to feed themselves or their family. he is a laborer, and earns 81 usd a month. >> we rely on food subsidy if it is taken away, i will not be able to survive. i'm the soul wage earner, i have four children and they are all studying. it costs a lot. >> protecting the poorest in society and access to cheap food. the food security act guarantees that right for as many as 600 million people. this is the indian's government worry at the conference in indonesia, worried that a welfare program to give cheap food to 600 million people will contravene the new rules. >> can bebarter away a compromise when it comes to a fundamental right to food security. i would like to make this absolutely clear that we have not come here as petitioners to beg for a peace clause. >> reporter: four years ago when food subsidies were threatened farmers came to new delhi to event their anger. now the pressure is on india and up to 30 other nations to come into line and cut the help they give to the farming industry and poor consumers. the program could cost the government $20 billion u.s. dollars a year, and it's far above the current limit net by the wto. the talking has continued through the night to try to confirm the agreement. india is wondering what the agreement means for them and an already week global economy. >>> in the philippines the recovery effort is still plainfully slow almost a month after typhoon haiyan hit. but there is a movement to get the local economy moving again. >> reporter: there's very, very little left on the store like at tacloban, this man knows that too well. he is a fisherman, or rather he was, given that his boat now sits a couple of kilometers inland. >> translator: before i was earning about 300 pesos a day from the catch. but now i don't earn anything because what i catch is what we eat because i don't have boat. >> reporter: his story is replicated thousands of times across tacloban. so the challenge after the emergency aid phase is to get people working and let the local economy take over again. every street in tacloban is an absolute mess and they need cleaning up, which means you have ready made jobs, which is why you have up to 20,000 people lining up to take part. >> even if they are cleaning their house, we give -- we pay them. our point is that if every one of them are cleaning up tacloban, we can revive it, and then they are able to buy things. if you go to the market, you can see there are a lot of things for sale. immediately the economy has been reviveded. >> reporter: pretty much everywhere you go here, you uncover little success stories. sometimes it's just someone who owns a restaurant, a place to gather at a tough time. these are the people who won't let their city die. >> i have to look for the regular suppliers of our drinks, of our meat, vegetables, that kind of stuff. i thought to myself, maybe we could just start offering one or two of our regular menu. >> reporter: the can do attitude, perhaps the only thing that could triumph over adversity such as this. >>> all right. lots more still to come here on the news hour. we'll have reaction from havana to the death of nelson mandela. and world cup debutantes because nia prepare for a difficult match. the details in around 20 minutes. >>> hello again, adrian finnegan here in doha. our top stories. ♪ >> south africans have been celebrating the life of nelson mandela, and tributes are being paid word wide, the 95-year-old icon died in his home on thursday. he'll be laid to rest in a p private ceremony on december 15th. leaders from 40 african nations are meeting in paris to discuss military intervention. more now on the death of nelson mandela. we have a former campaign manager for the south african leader. he joins us live from new york. thanks for being with us. having worked so closely with nelson mandela i can understand today must be a particularly emotional one for you. what memories of him are foremost in your mind right now? >> i mean right now i'm thinking about the election period because that was when i spent the most amount of time with him. and he was an incredible man. we would be out campaigning and his security would be trying to keep him away from the hordes of people and he would break every security rule in the book and make sure he could touch and speak to as many as he could, particularly the children. and in the last four months of the campaign, he probably spoke directly to more than 2 million people across the country. the former president said he found mandela's lack of bitterness astonishing. what are we to make of that lack of bitterness? and what are you able to tell us about the relationship between the two men, declerk and mandela? >> i think the lack of bitterness and mandela's focus on reconciliation are well documented. he was the kind of leader that was ten steps ahead of everyone else. he had the foresight to put behind the past and rebuild the country. but there was a wonderful moment in the election campaign. i think mandela deep down had a deep dislike for de[ inaudible ] but understand he needed him as a partner. we encouraged him to be negative and attack declark, but in the middle of the interview he attacked him quite vigorously. and in the last minute of the interview, he says both of us are leaders of this country, we're going to have to work together. and he put his hand physically out, and declark had no choice but to take his hand. so i think it was sort of a bitter-sweet relationship. >> without him and his attributes, would the country do you think have descended into civil war? is this >> absolutely it would have. i think it happened sort of a year and a bit before the elections when a very senior and prom meant leader was murdered and if it wasn't for mandela calling for calm that was the time the country was ready to explode. and i think his ability to get people to calm down and get them to be focused on the future was an incredibly contribution, without which i think the country could have easily gone off of the rails. and we miss that quality in south africa today, but he did what he needed to ensure a successful transition. >> thank you very much. >>> we continue to get reactions from around the world. let's hear from daniel who is in the cuban capitol havana, one of the places nelson mandela headed for after his release from prison. >> that's right, and i think the news of his death has a big impact here. president castro spoke expressing his sympathy with mandela's family, talking about the great ties there have been between the two countries. after castro came to power, he expressed unity with nelson mandela and supported the anti-apartheid campaign with cuba sending troops fighting against the apartheid troops -- the troops sent from the apartheid south africa. and nelson mandela after his release from prison, thanked fidel castro for that support, saying it was fundamental to weakening the regime. he came to visit fizzle castro soon afterwards. and i think there was also a very personal bond between the two apparent when you look at the old video of the two men together. there seemed to be a mutual respect expressed. very strongly felt here in cuba. flags at half mast and official day of mourning to mark his death. >> daniel thanks indeed. >>> loads of social media reaction to the death of nelson mandela. for all of that, let's join "the stream" in washington, d.c. >> hello, we have been covering nelson mandela's death using traditional media, and there is so much going on in social media as well. mandela's passing as become one of the most discussed topics in twitter history. each of the orange dots represents a mention of mandela happening in real time. so if you are tweeting his name right now your tweet will be sented on this map. i'm going to bring in the producer of "the stream." >> right. this is an incredibly global scale. you showed the map of it happening in real time. what i'm going to pull up on my screen here is the trending hashtags from right before the announcement of his passing to about four hours later. now this starts at about 1900 gnt. this is a map of what people were tweeting. it starts off with no hashtag, but over the course of four hours the dominant hashtag explodes. one of the biggest was madeva, referring to nelson mandela's tribe name. >> the kids all have a picture of nelson mandela, and that's in india. and so many other countries are looking and memorializing nelson mandela. are there themes? >> i'm glad you mentioned india. we talked about how brood of an impact he had. what i'm pulling up now is one of the hashtags we saw in spanish. elsewhere in arabic, of course . . . and we even have one here in french, we lost a universal hero yesterday. in addition to that, there are pictures. >> of course. >> because online is known for that. >> right. >> here is one i'm showing out of london. >> let me take you on a journey. we're going to start in south africa in johannesberg. and this shows you some of the tweets she hasn't touched upon. in johannesberg that's the home city of nelson mandela. and then to the uk, this is wooster. that is an essential part of the uk, and into new york, and again, people are tweeting and memorializing nelson mandela there. so it's amazing how a black south african and his life is resinating around the world. we're getting a sense of some critique of how people are memorializing nelson mandela from the united states.o cf1 o >> right. mr. don twitter writes in . . . elsewhere prince tweets in . . . so we need to remember that also people are saying. >> there is one more place i want to take you to see where the trending hashtags are and the instagrams as well. have a look at this. ♪ >> what was basically done in the last couple of minutes is have been curecurerating for you. and my final go-to place is the al jazeera blog spot. live blogging from all of the news coverage that we're doing here. that's a look at the social media impact of the death of nelson mandela. >>> the death of nelson mandela has touched communities all around the world. in the uk ordinary people are remembering the impact he had on their lives. >> we just saw a picture from outside south africa house on twitter, and that's because many of the anti-apartheid cers fled to london, and it was an issue at the heart of the political awakening of a generation. >> while hundreds have been gathering outside south africa house here in london, site of so many protests in the '70s and '80s. lawrence lee has more. >> reporter: left wingers used to be held to abuse for holding protests. now it's a shrine. people arriving to talk eagerly about what nelson mandela meant to them. this man produced what was clearly a treasured souvenir, his head just peaks from the background during nelson mandela's visit in the 1990s. >> he taught us as much about ourselves as much as how we should treat other people. but that time -- i always say this is the sort of greatest moment of my working life was that day. >> because you saw mandela. >> yeah. it is. i have never this ever since. >> for people born after the 1990s, it is difficult to explain what mandela meant. it is precisely because the iniquity of apartheid was proso easy to understand, but mandela's generation helped whole groups of people understand what it was like. and people got judged on what their attitude was towards south africa and the anc. mandela help millions and millions of time set a moral campus about what they thought about the world. ♪ >> and because apartheid was so easy to understand rebel against anthems like this one were sung across all universities for years and years. would they choose to put the money in a bank with links to the south africa governments? would they support mu musicians who played music there. >> margaret thatcher used to describe mandela as a terrorist. most people would say nowadays that that puts her on the wrong side of history, and those who formed the anti-apartheid movement so many years ago are the ones being congratulated now. >> our former headquarters in london, it was the anti-apartheid movement that [ inaudible ] congress. >> some people say the struggle was supposed by so many in britain, because of white post colonial guilt. maybe that's true, but perhaps a lesson for the future as well as a story from that past. >>> let's bring youment some other news from europe now. at least seven people have been killed by hurricane-force winds and tidal surges. thousands of homes have been left without power, and flights, rail, and ferry services have been canceled. in eastern england thousands of homes were evacuated. >> reporter: it's one of the fiercest storms to have hit europe in years. it blasted its way towards the mainland. people were warned to stay in doors and avoid the worst of the weather. especially at risk were the large freight ships sailing through this trade route. as the hurricane made its way across the uk, lifeboat crews rescued people from their homes. devastation inside isn't it? >> low lying areas were at risk of tidal surges. there were fears that flood defenses would not contain the held up. >> there is that combination of the investment in infrastructure, and then giving people warnings ahead of time. evacuationed coordinated by the police and local authorities. that team work has made all of the difference. ar part of the coast hasis escaped the worst of the surge, but it's not completely out of trouble yet. there is a surge expected again on friday night, and it could cause some limited damage in the area. this was the worst surge the eastern coast had experienced in 60 years. such incidence are rare in this region, but it's low enough to make many living here consider this home. >>> ukraine's president has arrived in russia for talks with vladimir putin. the pair have been discussing how to lay the foundations of a new strategic partnership. but once again people are on the streets of kiev. let's cross live to kiev and speak to our correspondent, tim friend. tim the people demonstrating there want the ukraine to have closer ties with europe rather than russia, so they are not going to see this meeting too kindly, are they? >> no, they are not. they are aiming for a million people out on the streets this weekend on sunday, the biggest ever crowd to have gathered here in independence square. as you say they want closer ties with the european union. they see that as their savior, because frankly, the economy here is in a terrible mess. but the ukrainian president has towards moscow for help, and this new meeting, this further meeting with president putin, there have been several over the last month or so, is highly controversial. can russia afford to bail out ukraine? that's the real question people are asking here. and of course it has been played out in ukraine, but it's an international row as well. some of the western european leaders have been out here, meeting the demonstrators, offering them support insofar as its peaceful, and of course, russia sees that as people making trouble in their own very, very controversial, and will, perhaps, lend the protesters here even more anger as they go into this weekend of protests. >> there are a lot of issues at play, aren't there, tim, for example from the former prime minister, who the eu think is facing charges because of politic political reasons. we have heard for more delays in the trial, haven't we? yes. she didn't turn up in court today. she has back problems and her health is an issue. and one of the stipulations with the european union was for her release to have medical treatment outside of ukraine, and she is never far from controversy here in kiev, and the current president sees her as an arch enemy of course, if she had been released, that might have been seen as a sign of weakness, and so she very much is at the center, still of this debate. >> tim friend live for us in kiev. tim thank you. the world cup. here is farah. >> thank you so much. the groups for the 2014 world cup in brazil have been drawn. our reporter has been following the draw in brazil. what has been the initial reaction to who brazil have drawn? >> well, the brazilians seam pretty happy as you might imagine. they are going to open against croatia in their home of sal palo, and as mentioned mexico, which is a team that always poses a certain threat but has certainly struggled to get into this world cup, and then cameroon, ranked only 59th in the world, but still a lot of experience for the cameroon team. the brazilians are feeling pretty good about this first draw. if they get past that first round, and that's certainly what nose brazilians are expecting, things could get much more difficult very fast. it could get very difficult, very quick for the brazilians. >> and people have been traveling all over the country for group games. are the fans worried that that will effect how they play? >> well, for the brazilians, not really. they are going to be in sal palo, that's only a 45-minute flight from their home base. and so they are not too worried about the travel. they kind of know what to expect. i think the big travel issues will be for some of the other teams. especially england that has to open up from an over two-hour flight. but for a lot of the other teams they certainly are worried about it. brazil is a country almost exactly the size of the al united states. >>> all right. let's take a look at group b. columbia, greece, ivory coast and japan make up group c. group d is looking like one of the tightest. uruguay, england, and italy. switzerland, ecuador and honduras are in group e. iran and nigeria are other teams in group f. also in group g are ghana and the united states, and group h includes belgium, algeria, russia and south korea. let's go to seioga now, and what is the reaction from because nia's group? the >> well, in the first place there wasn't much speculation about which group would be good to get, and which group would be bad to get, because the excitement for being there was so huge, that whatever group you get would be kind of good enough. so if you get a weaker position you get more chances to going through. if you get stronger position, it could more difficult. argentina is lead by the greatest football player of our time. >> all right. thank you so much for now let's hear from former england international mark. let's start with england. they are in a pretty tough group, aren't they? this >> it was a bit of a -- moment when the draw came out. we know all about the south american sides. and then we have got italy to notoriously good at this kind of competition. let's hope they have a slow start when we play them in the first game. >> and spain versus netherlands, a repeat of the last final. is the spain team as strong as they once? >> well, you have two really top, top coaches. i think it could be tied this year. i think you look at the players that will be playing for spain, all going to champions league, all long seasons, then they have the travel climate to play in. i think for spain i would expect them to get to the knockout stages, but i think this could be a world cup for far too many. and group g who is any stand out there? >> well, g for germany. they always get their teams to perform. the consistency, the scoring goals. they have their all-time leading goal scorer playing for them, and it's a german's side that is packed with players, so that says it all, i think. >> and mark i want to know what the secret to success is. >> not to lose your first game. if you come away without losing in in the first game then you have the on if ied dense to build on. if you lose your first game you through all of your onions into one pot. you need to go into the second game with something on the table. >> okay. thank you so much for joining us. >>> there's a dedicated section of the draw on our website, check out aljazeera.com/sports. >> thanks. more news straight ahead here on al jazeera. tÑ >>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm steph steph. here are the stories we're following for you. outside his home in south africa. a spontaneous tribute to nelson mandela, how he changed that country and beyond. a step in the right direction for the u.s. economy, a new report reveals the job picture is rienthing and unmroement is falling. a severe wind and ice storm is moving east. hundreds of thousands are without power, and travel problems are building. ♪
MSNBC
Dec 10, 2013 2:00am PST
>> thank you. thank you. long lived the spirit of nelson mandela. long live the spirit of nelson mandela. madiba mandela. viva! thank you very much. to the president, and the pretty president -- >>> we welcome you back to our live continuing coverage of this memorial for nelson mandela. reached the noon hour here. 5:00 a.m. east coast time in the united states on a very t unpleasant day weatherwise. heavy rain, lots of it, increasing winds. most of the dignitaries you will see are, a, behind bullet-proof glass, b, a layer of glass separates them from the crowd behind them, but importantly, they are also covered from the rain, though. in fairness, some of it a falling close to sideways. in the v.i.p. section, as the formerer leader of south africa apparently e joys a piece of gum, you'll see people from all over the world, and the patchwork of politics is very much a part of this day. the official ceremony is getting under way, even though we don't yet i have in attendance, for example, all of the u.s. presidents, all of the official invited guests. we can report traffic is fairly well bottled up. there's a lot of pedestrian traffic coming to the stadium as one of the big goals of today was to allowes ordinary people come and be a part of this. it was very important. security has been very important. accommodations, finding hotel rooms for these huge delegations coming from close to 100 different countries. charlane hunter doll is here with me watching. >> the former president there, aging, but still carrying on. again, winnie mandela, who wa been grieving, i'm told, endlessly. >> lester holt's inside the stadium. lester, this has the feel of an official beginning, i'm guessing? >> yeah. i think this is the official beginning, and note you're going to see t empty seats down front in the rain. but the stadium is quickly filling up. brian, there's huge significance of the location of the stadium. it's essentially the edge of soweto. a blackk township. a lasting -- these townships, set upso for black, kind of a lasting reemlast ing reminder of apartheid, yet that street right behind you, you can see black people and white peopletr walking together. something you wouldn't have seen out of the days of apartheid. in fact, the stadium was put here, the largest in africa, the 2010 world cup was here. again, a huge statement to how far this country has come, and it is almost easy to forget what apartheid must have looked like, readily talk about it, and they view this as a teachable moment to the rest of. the world and certainly to their children. thete generations coming up behd them, that they want them to know thisth history and what nelson mandela stood for and how they're able to live their lives today. many were bused here, came on train, many waiting at 2:00 for the gates to open and to be a part of this, to bask in the recognition of the world, that all the world is watching this and all the world is paying respects to nelson mandela and perhaps all the world has learned some of the lessons of reconciliation. >> lester holt inside the stadium. we're now told president obama's motorcade is on its way from his hotel to the arena. charlayne hunter dahl, once americans got to meet and know nelson mandela i know this is true in your case, the common denominator, often, was the struggler in the united states versus what wasin going on here which was, of course, bylaw as harsh as it gets, as suppressive as it gets, but nelson mandela at some pointas learned your ow personal history, which i hope you don't mind me saying involves you being y one of the first two african-american students att the university of georgia, 1961. it was a big deal and a big story at the time. >> well, you know, these relationships areim intertwined the civil rights movement and the, movement to free south africa. you know, they're parallel histories. many objective, freedom and equality. many don't know this because they associatete martin luther king primarily wir the civil rights movement, but when mandela was in prison, he went in '61-62, martin luther king spoke and described south african s racism as the worst i the world and he says even denying the blacks of basic right of non-violent protest. of course, everybody is mandela to gandhi and martin luther king, although neither of them was in favor of violence, but nelson mandela went to violence not to take over the country, but to get the white minority regime to listen to the demands of black people, but even as late, early in '64, martin luther king was calling for nelson mandela's release. in 1965, he spoke in london, and called for internal sanctions. he echoed that in the '80s and, of course you know, the free south african movement in which president obama spoke of being a part of as a young student was very much a part of the ultimate number of things that brought a man to apartheid in south africa. i was u here in '85, and as you said, it was a gruesome, gruesome period, and i went to a hilltop so that i could overlook the prison where they said nelson mandela had a garden that he used to tend, and i was so hoping, if i couldn't see him, i could see the garden, but, of course, i was followed by state security people an d had to leae in a hurry. >> well, there you are. pictures of you, the young woman, sitting down with nelson mandela. >> that was at the council on foreign relations when he made his first visit to new york. >> we're going to listen in here. this is cyril ramaposa number two man in the anc, has gone on to be a successful businessman here in south africa. so we'll join the program and jump in here to describe events as we. -- as we find out they ae happening. >> -- succeed if we reach out to each other. this is the man that we have come to say farewell to. a man who has built our nation. in many ways, we are here today to tell madiba that his long walk is over, that he can finally rest, that he can enjoy the view of our beautiful country, of south africa. a view he discovered when he began walking the hills of his birthplace. his long walk is over, but ours is only beginning, and with t t that, as we walk down memory lane, i would like us now to do what he would have wanted us to do. that is, to open this memorial service with an interfaith opening prayer. i would like to call upon chief rabbi warren, the hindu faith, for the muslim faith and archbishop of the christian faith to come and give us opening prayers on an interfaith basis. please, go ahead, chief rabbi. >> god and king who is full of compassion, god of the spirits of all flesh, in whose hands are the souls of the living and the dead, receive, we besiege you, in your great loving kindness the soul of nelson mandela who has beenen gathered unto his people. remember him for the righteousness which he has done. remember, o lord, how he exemplified the finest quality of your servant joseph, about whose great leadership generosity of spirit and powers of forgiveness we read in your hebrewew bible. joseph, the son of jacob, the son ofhe isaac, the son of abraham, was thrown into a pit with snakes and scorpions by his brothers whoho were filled with hatred and jealousy toward him and sold into slavery and skyexd from his home and father for 22 years many of which did a terrible injustice was spent in jail. joseph emerged from jail to become a leader and to a mighty nation. and when united with his brother, had an opportunity to exact vengeance and justice, and yet joseph the righteous transcendedd his personal pain and need for retribution by forgiving his t brothers so tha his family would not be torn apart f and destroyed forever. so, too, o lord, your servant nelson mandela like the biblical joseph rose up from jail to become president of a mighty nation. he, too, transcended his personal pain and years of suffering to forgive and to embrace his brothers and sisters who inflicted so much pain on hims and so many millions of others in order that our diverse south african family would not be torn apart by hatred and division. madiba brought to life the ancient words of joseph when he said to his brothers in genesis chapter 50, verse 19 -- fear not, for am i in place of god? although you intended harm, god redirected for good. in order to accomplish as is clear this day that the people be kept alive, so now fear not, i will t sustain you and your young ones, and so he comforted and spoke to their heart. nelson mandela spoke to our hearts. he brought us comfort, and through his mighty power of forgiveness, he sustained us and liberated our country from the pits of prejudice and injustice, unleashing the awesome generosity of spirit of millions of south africans. let his reward be with him and his recompense before him. shelter hise soul in the shadow of your wings. make known to him the parts of life in your presence is fullness of joy at your right hand liveske forever more. bestow upon him the abounding happiness that he's treasured up for the righteous. o god, who heals the broken hearted and binds up their wounds, grant your consolation toea the mourners, strengthen a support them in the day of their grief and sorrow and remember themem and their families for a long and good life. wipe away the tears of all south africans, and indeed the world. bless the people of this country, a nation of heroes, who came together to transcend the pain of the past in order to build a great nation on earth, and inspire our hearts to continue to walk in the path of nelson mandela, to look up to his majestic legacy as the bible says in the book of isaiah -- [ speaking in foreign language ] like one whom his mother comforts, so will i kmpt you, says the lord, and in jerusalem shall you be comforted. your sun should never sit, nor the moon wane for the lord god shall be your everlasting life and the days of your mourning shall be ended, and let us say, amen.r >> let us bow our heads and pray. ♪ o [ speaking in foreign languag ] language ]. >> o lord, you are the giver of physical vigor and spiritual force. your order is carried out by all objects and enlightened persons. your grace is immortality, your disfavor is death. to you all blissful divinity we offer our humble worship. for certain is the death of the born, and certain is the birth of the dead. then let's not grieve for what is inevertable. the end and the beginnings are unknown. we see only the intervening probations. that is why there is no need to grieve.he o supreme lord, lead us from untruth to truth, like our father nelson mandela. lead us from darkness to light, like our father nelson mandela and lead us from mortality like our father nelson mandela. may he rest in peace. amen. >> i begin with the opening chapters of the holy koran. [ speaking in foreign language ] all praises due to the almighty, lord of the world, who is unequal and unmatched in every one of his attributes. [ speaking in foreign language ] the ba neff sit, the merciful, the master of the day of judgment. [ speaking in foreign language ] o, almighty lord, you alone do we worship. you alone do we seek assistance from.. we extend our condolence to the mandela family and to the nation during this time of sadness for the passing away of madiba, a global icon of freedom in recent times. we place our endebtedness to madiba for his self-less efforts in salvaging the nation and leading it to the path of peace, reconciliation and harmony. and laying the foundationn of a free and prosperous south africa. almighty allah, o, our lord, our supreme lord, we besiege you that future leaders of this great country and leaders of the entire world y and people of th country and people of the world would stand up for the ideals and vision our madiba stood for. as madiba never lost an opportunity to reconcile people. we pray to you, o, almighty lord, let us strive towards peace, harmony, reconciliation on the basis of human dignity. as he made everyone feel important whenever he met them, we ask of you, o, almighty lord, let us acknowledge each other in our places of work and our places of residence. as he stood up to injustice and illegal wars, let us do likewise, even if it is waged by the powerful. as he stood up for the oppressed people of the world, we pray to you, almighty allah, to help us sustain that resolve and realize we preserve our freedomel by helping others towards freedom. as youed are merciful and as th prophet muhammad -- [ speaking in foreign language ] -- have mercy and kindness to people in this world, the almigh almighty's, kindness toward you. we ask of you, almighty, to plant inwe the hearts of every human being the seed of kindness, and as madiba lived an example showing us his spirit of self-sacrifice, we ask of you, almighty lord, grant us the grace of resisting corruption and temptation, and, finally, on this prayer we ask for almighty allah, let us dedicate ourself to the good ideals he stove to in his life. amen. >> [ speaking in foreign language ]. >> creator, lord of life and love, you hold the whole universe in your hands, and yet you also have your hand on all of our heads. you know the face of the nations and the hopes and fears of each individual. on this day of madiba's memorial service, we pray for peace of the world, for peace without, for peace within. jesus christ, prince of peace, may your shalom touch every place of conflict, division, brokenness or fear. may it fill our communities, familiesne and lives from the horrors turmoil of nations in conflict, to fractured relationships and violence in too many home, bring your reconciling love. lord, we pray for south africa in particular on this memorial day. help us to draw and address of our past, and to build on a firm foundation that by your grace madiba laid for us.ir give us courage to hold fast, to heed values, to follow the example of his practices, and to share them with the world. we lift our hearts with gratitude for your loving care that you have now called madiba home to his eternal rest where pain and suffering are no more. we commend his soul to your keeping, and we commend his family to your loving embrace, and we say to madiba, go forth revolutionary and loving soul on your journey out of this world in the name of god who created you suffered with you and liberated you, go home, madiba. you have self-lessly done all that is good, noble and honorable for god's people. we will continue where you have left off, the lord be our helper. we now turn to you, lord, it is our darkness, sadness pain and death in tears and mourning, we believe you will console us, that you will give us the strength to hold in our hearts and minds and the courage to enact in ourng lives the values madiba fought and stood for. we turn to you, lord, and entrust madiba's soul to eternl rest and loving arms as he rejoins the madiba clan, to all the faithful departed, we pray particularly for his closest and de dearest for his children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren and all his relatives, may you surround them with your loving arms, your embrace and comfort at this dark time of mourning, at this perfect time when you have called him to rest and perfect end, accept his soul and number him with the a company of the redeemed in heaven. console and comfort his family, console and comfort south africa, africa and the world. may his long walk to freedom be enjoyed andd realized in our tie by all. may he rest in peace and rise in glory. amen. nelson mandela nelson mandela nelson mandela [ singing in foreign language ] nelson mandela nelson mandela nelson mandela [ singing in foreign language ] ♪ [ singing in foreign language ] >> lester holt, this is coming after some of the organized prayer,alities musical interlude. >> and we'll soon be hearing from a friend and the family of nelson mandela here. you see that picture right there captures so much. that people of every color who have come to represent will be called a new south africa here. a true tribute to mandela, as you look across this crowd here that has withstood a steady light to moderate rain all morning long. we've also been watching, of course, brian, the collection of dignitaries and we can't really overstate the complexity of the operation of getting the celebrity, the politician, the world leaders in here safely. the south africans said they've been studying the plan for quite some time and working with their counterparts in the u.s. and other b countries to get everyo herere safely. we were on that issue of security -- we were able to get in today without screening. the crowd, many of them, were bused in. screened at another point, but when they came in, we all everybody just sort of pour in to the stadium. that may be a reflection on the mood. this is aom time of joy, a timef celebration. as you know, the dignitaries well protected behind their bullet-proof glass on the stage. at one point during one of the prayers,s, the crowd just above me, on the tier above me, broke out in spontaneous song, and you see a lot of that here. t almost -- many celebrations going on within this larger memorial. brian? >> lester, you're so right to point out, you know, viewers in 2013 see nothing unusual about the shots of the crowd. it looks like a crowd. it is revolutionary and remarkable when viewed through the prism of the former system of apartheid. and was just not possible back in the south africa where blacks were to leave the streets at 9:00 p.m. inth populated parts the city and brought back to the townships. this is andrew, an inmate along with nelson mandela, and he will start our series of remembrances. >> nelson mandela. [ inaudible ]. >> let me just -- let me just jump in here. this is what we feared, because of the weather. this is rain fade in the tv business, and it means that waves are rain are interfering with the ability i of a satelli dish tot push the signal up to space and get it back down to you. so if you lose audio, if you see the picture digitize briefly, that's what we're dealing with, and it's just because of this rough weather we're having here, here today. lester holt can still broadcast from inside, but it's this main camera position through south african tell installation we're having a problem with. we will try to stay with it. >> it is -- a technical marvel how quickly all of this was put together, brian. i mean, the truth is, and i think most people understand that in these situations, quietly and in a sensitive way, preparations have been under way for quite some time for the death of nelson mandela, but, of course,, things, you know, many things are d put into action he in these last severalma days, including accrediting the massive contingent of press from all around the world, wiring the stadium, coordinating all the satellite technology, and weather has been an issue here. we had issues earlier in the week with the steady rain, but i think it look it's like you're getting a clearer picture now. so we'll let you go back now to hear them speak. >> lester, th
Bloomberg
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
>> nelson mandela as died today. it has just been announced. nelson mandela, who spent 27 years in prison. he was the first black elected president of stojakovic in 1994. let's learn more about his life. >> a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> from prisoner to president. nelson mandela's 1990 release from jail signaled the end of south africa's racist policy of apartheid. he would go on to become the untry's first true democratically elected leader. >> i, nelson mandela do here swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. >> born to a chief of a small village, mandela was one of 13 children and the first member of his family to attend school. in the 1930's he began opposing authority and the authorities that made colored south africans second-class citizens. as white south africa became more aggressive, so did he. as the head of the armed wing of the african national congress, mandela led violent sabbatini town hall attacks and was arrested and tried in 1962. he would spend 27 years in jail, but he was never forgotten. eventually international and internal pressure led the president to announce apartheid would be dismantled and mandela would walk free. but rather than secret bution, mandela reached out to his former oppressors and tried to heal a divided nation. >> in 1993 he and declercq shared the nobel peace prize. >> we appreciated the contribution they have made toward the development of this country. >> in 1994 he voted for the first time with millions of his fellow black south africans. he became a statesman, an international icon. for south africa, he was a symbol of the country it wanted to be despite struggles with poverty, racism and aids. feel any hatred, bitterness, feel any idea for revenge or recrimination. >> many will remember this. mandela celebrating south africa's place on the world stage, hosting the world cup. >> a simple tribute from a child sums up his place in south africans' hearts. it reads thank you for our dignity. >> nelson mandela, dead at the age of 95. our chief washington correspondent peter cook is on khalil now with some -- on capital hill with reaction. he was similar in many cases to george washington. he served one term. he was elected in 1994 and did not choose to run again. >> that's right. and obviously his impact on south africa much more prodigious than that one term in office. again, the impact he had not just on south africa, but on other nations as well, the global impact, a nobel peace prize winner. he had a great impact here on politics even in the united states. someone who of course is a big focal of the anti-apartheid movement and the whole call for sanctions here in the united states while he was imprisoned. we are starting to get early reactions from members of congress, some of whom have met with nelson mandela in the past. we are waiting word from the white house. president obama is sure to have something to say about this in the next bit. most of the comments we are seeing already from congress, praising nelson mandela, the life he lived and what he meant not only to south africa, but to the world as a whole. i expect we are going to get a lot more of those comments in the next bit as people take stock of this man's life. he had been sick for sometime. we spoke in the last hour about the fact that president obama was in africa when there was a concern that maybe nelson mandela's health was failing him then and perhaps the president might visit. that didn't happen at the time, and now we get word that at age 95, nelson mandela has passed on. i expect to hear a significant amount of reaction from the united states to this news. >> we have gotten news that president obama will be making a statement at about 20 minutes past the hour. in that report you spoke about mandela, of nelson and the lack of rancor he had toward past enemies. that has not meant peaceful times though? >> no. but you can imagine what it would be like had nelson mandela not reached out that way after he left prison in 1990. it has been documented in films. a new film out documenting nelson mandela and the decisions he made, the action he he took and the message he delivered at that time. i will take myself back to my college days and a class i took happened to have a particular focus on south africa when i was in college. we had a visitor in class, and it was someone who had served on robin island with nelson mandela. they had been sell mates together or on the same cell block. he told a powerful story about the impact nelson mandela had on him and the guards in the prison. he was still in prison at the time, and this person talked about how the guards at robin island understand stood what sort of man mandela was, respected him, listened to him, were eddie educated by him. that was a powerful message no a young college student about this person who went on to become president of stojakovic. >> any recollection of affect that mandela has had on american politics? >> i think the president will speak to that in just a short time. the question that the first african-american president certainly watched what happened with nelson mandela in stojakovic. it had had.tory it has had an affect on politics here, the anti-apartheid movement, to pass sanctions here in congress, the debate that took place here in the united states over constructive engagement. >> also the withdrawal of u.s. investment dollars to companies that did business with the apartheid regime? >> absolutely. there were some companies facing some very tough decisions at that time. and we have a lot of discussion about sanctions ever since. that is going to be part of nelson mandela's history. the legacy not just in south africa, but in this country as well. >> as far as u.s. politics go, when nelson mandela would come and speak with u.s. representatives, did you find there was anything that changed as a result of his meetings? >> my sense is the few times where i had been covering it, the question was how many people could get in a room to get their picture taken with the man. that was the kind of impact he had, and people from both parties respected what he did nobel omplished, the peace prize. they wanted to be associated with him and wanted to learn from him as well. you will find no shortage of praise for nelson mandela's life and legacy coming from aisles. >> peter cook, our chief washington correspondent. once again, president obama will be addressing the nation about the death of president nelson mandela. 20 minutes past the hour. more next on "taking stock." >> breaking news from bloomberg. this is "taking stock" on bloomberg. i am pimm fox. nelson mandela, former president of south africa has died at the age of 95. nelson mandela was the leader of his country. he became president in 1994. joining us now via telephone from johannesburg is bloomberg wilde. l reporter franz what is the move there? >> we can say very little because it is the middle of the night. midnight.t gone i have just driven through johannesburg and there is really nobody out and about. zuma was say is that very somber when he appeared on tv just a few moments ago. everyone is incredibly sad. this is a moment that south africans have been preparing for, for a long time. lmost the last 12 months there has been an almost daily expectation they may come. >> you have been reporting from south africa for four years. when you look at those four years, what role has mandela played in people's image of their country? >> mandela is still and will be for some wild, possibly forever, the looming figure in politics. there has been a lot of trepidation about what will appen when he does pass away simply because his role has been so important. i have just actually arrived at his house, and the area is blocked off by police with flashing lights. coming e a few citizens to the house on foot presumably to see what is going on, possibly to pay their respects already. mandela, since i have been here, has not been 100% in terms of being present. but everyone has still always referred to him and looked to him as kind of the guiding light of south african politics. >> has there been any controversy surrounding mandela recently as well as his home are and potential funeral? >> there has some controversy surrounding his family, and there have been fights within rights to egarding a company that he set up for the benefit of his family. fighting always been within his family regarding where he should be buried. so that has somewhat overshadowed his legacy in the past. i think in the greater scheme of things, nobody will look back and remember those. what people will remember is the man himself. >> can you describe a little bit more of the scene at mandela's house and whether you now what the next steps are? >> i am afraid i am not able to get any closer. i am about to walk in, and i will be able to describe more then. is -- can say to far clearly tomorrow is going to be a day of mourning, whether official or not. preparations for a state funeral of the highest order will be made immediately, i am , and i'm sure in the morning south africans in their masses will go to their places of worship or will come to this house and pay their respects to someone. many south africans have a very personal love for him even if they have never met him themselves. >> tell us about the neighborhood, tell us about the location where you are, if you can give us any comparative so people can understand what it is like to be there in johannesburg? >> sure. he comes from sovereign wetto, the township, which has historically always been very poor. in s the biggest town johannesburg. that has kind of always been home. he lives in an up market suburb in johannesburg. he lives in a fairly quiet treet here, very large properties, big houses, leafy trees everywhere. since the end of apartheid, he has had a property here. >> what has been the relationship of his image to the a.n.c., the african national congress. >> as before, he is definitely the biggest name, the biggest figure to come out of the a.n.c. he was the one who in the 40's formed the a.n.c. youth league. he then radicalized the a.n.c. and convinced the a.n.c. to pursue a program of sabotage against the apartheid government. he has always been the person everyone looks to. in his later years, he has faded. he has not had the presence to lead the organization anymore, but he has always been the point of reference. he has always been the one anyone would refer to if they the moral high ground, or if they wanted to talk about the direction of the country. >> now, is there a divide we need to understand when we think about south africa that still exists economically as well as educationally and socially? >> there has been a huge divide in south africa. south africa remains a very unequal society. white south africans on average earn six times more than the average black south africans. there is a huge racial component to all of this. psychologically there are huge racial divisions. economically, a lot of the economic assets remain in white hands. recently in the last few years, that has increasingly become a big talking point in a lot of political circles. there are a lot of poor black south africans who remain unemployed, who may not feel they have benefited from the end of apartheid. >> we are bringing in ian bremer, the founder of the euro asian group. he is on the phone. what role did nelson mandela play on the world stage? >> it was unique. you look around the world today, and absent of the kind leaders and al statesmen that mandela represented. if people like gorbachev, yu and others in singapore. but he did not just capture the imagination of the country and the continent, but of the entire world in thinking about prospects of hope. there are people who have things like that on all sides of the political spectrum. but none really walked and talked the way that mandela did. his legacy in south africa will be unmatched of that of anyone we can think about. >> we are awaiting president obama. he is set to give a statement on the death of nelson mandela from the white house. what impacts has nelson mandela had on u.s. president politics? >> two things. first of all, i did want to make a point, which in south africa, there is actually going to be a lot of impact here. he a.n.c. has elections coming up, and they have had a hard time of it. the economy has had a difficult time. the a.n.c. has never gotten since 2% of the vote mandela was in charge of the country. they were set to under perform, and now they are not. now the vote turn out will be great, and it will be very solidly pro a.n.c. the legacy of mandela is really going to matter there. for the united states, in recent years mandela has had the kind of impact that martin luther king had. -- unifying union figure that gets beyond race. some of the best moments that you see in american statesmanship reflects the kind of rhetoric and ideals that mandela actually lived by. but when you look at congress today, when you look at what happened to obama in the knife years since he was initially elected, i think we are very r, sadly, from mandela's legacy in the united states. i think when you look at the global stage and you ask there that is the kind of statesman that mandela really represented to the world, and you scratch your head. we are just not in that enviroent today. we don't have anyone coming to mind that would fit those shoes. they are very big shoes indeed. > yen, one of the fame he is images is of nelson mandela attending the soccer world when it came to stojakovic. what role did that play? >> he was very frail at the time. there was a big question of whether or not he would be able to make it at all. there was south africa appearing on the global stage in the same way that when bengal hosted the olympics, marking the coming of age of china as a real international actor of global capacity. it was so fitting that mandela was able to see that through for his country. i wasn't there, but i of course watched it on tv, as we all did, and you can't tell that it electrifying moment, bringing south africans as a nation together, and also an xpress of joy and harm -- arm hone globally that we experienced on the football pitch, the olympics in ways we very rarely do in any other aspects of society today. >> i want to break in, yeen. let's listen to president obama speaking from the white house on nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed his tatement from the dock saying, "i have fallout against white domination, and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and to achief. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. today he has gone home, and we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and beings y good human will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president emboddened the promise that huge beings and countries can change for the per. -- for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him set an example that all humanity should aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or our own personal lives. and the fact that he did it all with grace, and good humor, and an ability to acknowledge his own imperfections only makes the man that much more rrkable. as he ones said, i am not a saint unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did shah involved an issue, or a policy or politics, was a protest against apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they are guided by their hopes and not by their fears. like so many around the globe, i could not fully imagine my life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him . to michelle and -- to his family, michelle and i extend our deepest sympathy and gratitude for sharing this extraordinary man with us. his life's work meant long days away from those who loved him most. i only hope that the time spent with him these last few weeks brought peace and comfort to his family. to the people of south africa, we draw strength from the example of renewal, and reconciliation and resilience that you made real. a free south africa at peace with itself. that is an example to the worlt and that is madev archer's legacy to the nation he loved. we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the example that he set, to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. to never discount the difference that one person can make. to strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. for now let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe torts justice. may god bless his memory and keep him in peace. >> president obama speaking at the white house on the death of nelson mandela, the former president of south africa, dead at the age of 95. the president speaking about the road from prisoner to president and the peaceful transfer of power in south africa. here to tell us more, i want to joining john walcott, us from washington, d.c. tell us more about nelson mandela. you have interviewed him and spoken with him? >> i have, and it was a privilege. as the president said, it was a privilege for all of the thousands of people who met him. one of the most remarkable people i have ever met. i never had a chance to meet ghandi and others, but he is absolutely in that league. at a time our politicians here in the united states seem to ave trouble reaches across the aisle, this man reached across a chasm that seems almost unimaginable and brought the two sides that as a reporter in the 1980's i did not think was possible. >> can you describe your meeting? where was it, how long was it, and what was it like to be in the same room? >> it was in the 1990's in a visit he made here to washington. hour as i out an recall. there was a small group of us there. this was a man who simply took control of the room in the way that few others do because he had an inner peace about him, a sense of mission, that you very arely see in this world. and how he maintained that through all of his years of imprisonment was remarkable. i remember thinking how on earth can this man still act and believe this way after all of the things the injustices that were done to him? it was almost unimaginable. he really stood out as almost no one else i have ever had the privilege to meet has done, discussing in the most peaceful, reasonable terms, how to heal this breach between black, colored and white in south africa at a time when the whites were prepared for what they called a total onslaught. if apartheid died, they figured they all be slaughtered. instead they found nelson mandela. >> john, the president spoke about his first political activities related to protests ainst apartheid and also recalling the day that nelson mandela was set free from robin island after 27 years as a prisoner. that was in 1990. what can you tell us about his time in prison? did reporters ask him about that? >> reporters did ask him about it, and his answers were as if he had spent some time at his grandmother's house. he simply accepted what had happened to him, felt it had strengthened his purpose of mission. the remarkable there was there was no bitterness or anger, which would have been entirely justified. there was none that. there was simply a sense that what had been done to him had been done to hundreds and thousands of other are south africans. many of thome had been killed. and his mission in life was to put that behind him and his country. the degree to which he succeeded in doing that is remarkable, though as my colleague said earlier, enormous problems continue to playing that country looking ahead. but when you look backward, it is absolutely remarkable that experience, f that 27 years on robin island, with a sense of hope and purpose rather than bitterness. >> john walcott, as someone who follows the back and forth in politics, in listening to jameer nelson, did he speak like a politician, or did he have a different kind of voice? >> no. he had a completely unique voice. the two people that came to mind most thinking about him ere ghandi and david betgurian, people for whom their mission was in part moral or even religious. there was a merger of morality nd politics and mission that really you see very, very often. there was no cynicism, no manipulation. what you saw was what you got. you asked him a question, and you got a straight answer. sometimes a self-deprecating one. he had a sense of humor as the president mentioned. didn't seem to take himself terribly seriously, which is something we don't always see in politicians. this was a man with a purpose that dominated everything about him and was larger than even he was, and he was pretty large. >> john walcott, the president spoke about nelson mandela as a representative of the idea that one person can make a difference. did you find that that also enfused your conversation with him? >> there is no question. he did what -- as i said before, there were a lot of people who covered it much more closely than i did, thought was absolutely impossible, thought the end of apartheid would come in blood. and the fact that it did not was largely the work of nelson mandela. it was always the work of prime minister burch ota, his white counterpart. but without nelson mandela, that would have never happened. when a giant leaves the earth, there is no one who can fill his shoes. >> john walcott, stay with us a moment. bloomberg news reporting from washington, d.c. i want to bring in peter cook, our chief washington correspondent. you have some reactions from the house ma majority and minority leaders? >> i do speed. nancy pelosi. i wanted to read from the democratic leader of the house. he ultimate tribute to the triumph of hope. to his family, friends and loves once, so many mourn his loss at this sad time. house speaker john boener with a glowing tribute to nelson mandela. he was an unrelenting voice for democracy and his long walk to freedom showed an enduring faith in god and dignity. his ability to fight the apartheid system will inspire future generations. he came here as president and spoke to a joint session of congress in 1990, someone many members of congress spent time with when they visited to south africa. hey all wanted to be in this man's presence and wanted to carry some of the grace that he exuded. >> my thanks to peter cook and john wall court in our washington, d.c. bureau. we have more coverage of nelson mandela, dead at the age of 95. that is next. >> this is "taking stock" on bloomberg. i am pimm fox. we are following the death of nelson mandela, who has died at the age of 95. we bring in tom carver. he covered the collapse of south african apartheid regime for the bbc. he is also the author of the book "where the hell have you been," the story of the prisoner of war, the son of bernard montgomery. so a career story for tom carver. can you tell us a story about what it was like to cover the apartheid regime in south africa? >> yeah. thanks for having me. it was an amazing experience, obviously, as a journalist to cover that transition. as several have said, there was nothing inevitable about how it came you out. it may well after descended to civil war. as a member of the bbc, i spent a lot of time covering civil wars in africa. i do think, as president obama said, that mandela's personal force of character did make a very significant difference in preventing that country going to civil war. i think one of the things that people forget now about it, which was just so extraordinary at the time was the immense pressure the man was under. i mean he had pressure from the international community to get this right. he also had pressure from his own party because there were many in the a.n.c. who were real hot heads who just wanted an armed struggle, who didn't want to negotiate with the whites. he had pressure from other parties. you remember the zulu leader. he was achieving at the bit. then there were the whites emselves, which were split down the middle between the moderates of declercq and ralph mayer, and the extremists of the a.w.b. he was juggling all these factions, and the fact that he managed to navigate his way through to an incredible outcome of an election, a very peaceful election, and then the transition to black majority rule without the whites really going up in arms, and also without the whites leaving the country, was an stob issuing achievement by him. >> tom carver, based on your experience of covering events in south africa and constituent to that, do you get the sense that nelson mandela might have viewed himself as a prisoner of war when he was on robin island? >> i think he did. i think he saw it as a type of war, yes. and we have to remember that at the very beginning he did support the armed struggle. he then renounced it. but he did believe in the idea in the a.n.c. was locked combat in its determination to achieve what it saw as justice and the right of one man-one vote. there were many different ways in which you could achieve that. and i think there is no question that the whites saw him as a prisoner of war in the sense they saw him as a titleist, and they used that word often against a lot of the a. thmplet c. leadership, and that is why he was locked up for -- the a.n.c. leadership, and that is why he was locked up for so many years without a proper trial on the most extreme island prison you could imagine. >> he was spoken of as a source of inspiration. could you describe a little bit about those 27 years and what that meant to mandela being able to seek reconciliation when he became president? >> well, the obvious thing to say, but it bears saying, is that many other men, most other men, would have crumbled under that condition, would have given up after 27 years of imprisonment and really would not have been able to function very effectively after they came out of prison. the fact that he went on to lead a government, lead a country, to negotiate a solution, is an incredible inspiration to anyone who thinks that just being a prisoner for your beliefs is enough. the other thing i would say, and i can tell you a little vignette, i think he was an inspiration in his humanity. when i went to interview him, i remember on one occasion he remembered that my producer's father was sick, and that was thing, i think. he didn't see my producer very often. she was a young south african girl. i remember him saying how is your father doing? that kind of amazing ability to mix that sort of personal connection, but with also an amazingly savvy political acumen. he was no push-over. he was able to, as i say, navigate these various tides in south african politics, and i think it was that mixture of humanity, personal charm and amazing political astuteness that was his greatness. >> he was also a well well-trained lawyer. how did he bring that to bear? >> probably like it helped incoln in the civil war. the fact that he could see both sides of the argument i think was very helpful, and i think that is where his lawyer's training came in. i think the the fact that he could zillion arguments clearly and be able to prosecutor a case in an articulate way, all these things came partly out of his lawyer's training, and i think it also gave him kind of a discipline of mind. because a lot of his comrades were not lawyers, were not trained in that way. then as this whole struggle went on, they tended to get more and more extreme and wanted to reach for the gun or some more extreme solution. and the fact that he was a lawyer, he was prepared to keep plodding along as a lawyer to prosecutor this case and move it along. he had that sort of mentality. >> thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. tom carver. many people taking to twitter in order to express their sadness over the passing of nelson mandela. russell simmons, the artist, said this -- more next on "taking stock." there are is "taking stock" on bloomberg. i am pimm fox. of course we have been following the breaking news that former president of south africa, nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. condolences and remembrances pouring in from political leaders all over the world. president obama speaking earlier from the white house. w. bush esident george saying today that president mandela was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our team. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace, and our world is better off because of his example. he will be missed, but his contributions will live on forever. joining us now on the telephone from are washington, former u.s. ambassador to south africa, don gibbs. he was ambassador to south africa from 2009 until earlier this year. ambassador gibbs, thanks very much for spending time with us. what can you describe as the relationship between nelson andela and the united states diplomatically? >> diplomatically and personally i think he has been an inspiration to all of us. i think he brought out the best in everyone who came into contact with him. i had the immense honor to be able to get to know him a little bit toward the end of his incredibly inspiring life. you can't help but be moved when you are in his presence. i think we should all take away from his incredible life that we can rise above any differences that we might have and come together to solve problems that face us all. >> ambassador gibbs, can you describe when you first met nelson mandela? >> actually the first time i t him when when haven't gore came into south africa, and we went in to have a conversation with mr. mandela. it was a true honor to watch both incredible minds exchanging and talking about both the past and the present. it was a very inspiring moment. you could see in that moment incredible wisdom and at the same time the incredible charm, his smile and laugh that inspired people around the world. >> ambassador gibbs, when you spent time as ambassador to south africa, can you describe how powerful nelson mandela's legend and legacy were were when it came to talking with members of the south african government? >> i think everyone in south africa, from those who knew him personally to those whose lives had been shaped by the legacy he left were so inspired by the example he set. it's a challenge for all of us, and i think the lesson i hope people will take away from his life is that we all can rise above our differences. i think south africa is still working to live up to the incredible example that he set. i think all of us around the world need to live up to that example in a time whether we are divided by political party, race or religion. nelson mandela offers us the lesson that we can step above that no matter how much pain has been caused in the past. we can rise above that and do better. s last great wish was to build a children's hospital in south africa. it just captured who he was. he wanted to give back to the community, and i hope people will honor him by contributing to that hospital, the nelson mandela children's fund u.s.a..org. >> ambassador gibbs, many u.s. ay emery's around -- embassy's around the world employ local workers. how did yours philly about mandela? >> they all called him tata. he is the father of the nation, their personal father. one of my staff told me that nelson mandela stayed in prison for 27 years for me. i can survive anything for 27 years to give back to him. he is the spirit that guided the nation and set it off on to the grand journey that it has. but he also smartly stepped down from power, realized it was not to be about him, but he wanted to build a nation that would survive past him. that is why i think south africa will continue to grow and prosper even without him and continue to be inspired by his example. >> i want to thank you very much for joining us, former ambassador to south africa, don gips, joining us from washington, d.c. former president of south africa, nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. this is "taking stock" on bloomberg. >> live from pier three in san francisco, welcome to the late edition of "bloomberg west," where we look at the technology and media companies shaping our world. i'm emily chang. let's get to the rundown. nelson mandel died at the age of 95 and tributes
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Dec 10, 2013 1:40am PST
freedom. my father also fought for spiritual freedom, to free yourself virtually. he talked about that it takes courage to have forgiveness. forgiveness is a difficult thing. i don't think it was easy. i don't think he woke up and said, "i forgive those who incarcerate me and everything." i think he knew if he didn't forgive, he would be forever imprisoned himself spiritually. and if you're not free here, you cannot be free definitely here. and so for me, the lesson is to have -- the lesson we can take away from his life is to have the courage to forgive other people. your own husband, if you are married, your own children, your own neighbors, your own community, people -- if we have the courage to forgive as human beings, there will be no wars that we see around us. there will be no crime. no violence, there would be no conflict. for me, that's the greatest gift that dada has given to the world. because he also says none of us when we're born are born hating another. we are taught to hate, and if you can teach a human being to hate, you can also teach a human being to love. to embrace, to forgive. and for me, this is the greatest lesson. >> listening to that, dr. dyson, we talk about nelson mandela, the politician, nelson mandela the moral leader. also a man of impeccable psychological insight and emotional intelligence. >> incredible. the kind of arc of his moral intelligence is rather incredible. it's rooted in practical principles but shows what motivates people. how their psychies can be damaged, but also uplifted. in that sense you've got to be a major motivator and inspirer and understand what moves your opponent, what moves your enemy, what moves your ally, and foster the alliances and allegiances necessary to make the nation stronger. i think in that sense he was a remarkable human being. >> and we said, dr. frasier, so much of that gained in prison, so much insight gained in those times in prison, were there any moments -- forgive me if you don't know the answer, but were there any moments when he feared or got close to the breaking point? >> that i don't know. but i can imagine as a human being one would. in 27 years, not just in jail, not just in the cell, but in hard labor. we forget, i think, often that he was out there breaking rocks, breaking lines. i mean, it was very difficult when you go to, as i had the opportunity several times to go to robben island, and you look at the pit where they were kept, and they were, you know, there was so many indignities where they had to go to the restroom in a little hole essentially close to where they would rest just to get shade from the day. so it was really hard labor. and you know, it was horrific, frankly. the cell -- it it was the best accommodation compared to the worst that they had to do. >> byron pitts, talking about the work, breaking up the line every day. we've seen the stories, that the dust created by the line so fine that it clogged up the prisoners' ear deduct. here of a man who because of the work he was doing was not able to cry. >> we talked this week to two men who were in prison with mandela on robben island. they both made the point that they never saw nelson mandela lose it, break down. but there were moment that they mentioned when nelson mandela was told that his son -- [ inaudible ] >> he asked permission to go to the funeral and was denied. so his cellmate tells the story of how mandela went to a meeting, came out, and normally would immediately tell his colleagues what was said to him. for this time for some reason he didn't. he walked away. he walked quietly to his cell and sat there. eventually walked over, suspecting something was wrong, he said, "madiba, what is wrong?" he said, "my son has died, and i cannot leave to be with him." they said they were taken by that. this was a moment where he didn't lose it, they said, but it was the one time all those years, those 28 years on robben island, that the burden of his life was heavy at that moment. in talking about sacrifice for his family, there's a wonderful quote from mandela where he says, "to be the father of a nation is a great honor. but to be the father of family is a great joy. but it was a joy i had far too little of." >> a joy denied to him for so long. in his final days he was surrounded by family. i want to go to the interview with his daughter where she talks about the last moments with her father. >> i think from last week, friday, until thursday, it was a wonderful time. if we can say the process of death is wonderful. but dada had a wonderful time because we were there, and when the doctors told us i think there's the morning -- they had warned us before signs. when they told us in the morning that there was nothing that they could do, and said to me, call everybody that's here, that want to see him and say bye-bye, it was the most wonderful day for us because the grandchildren were there, we were there, the professional doctors. and actually i think when they saw him slipping away, those doctors dedicated their time. they were running shifts through our shifts 24 hours being like they were soldier guiding this -- i don't know how to understand this. it was soldiers guiding the spirit. yes, my father comes from royalty. without them knowing they were taking our rituals and culture, they were there in silence. when we as family would come in, they would excuse themselves, and just a few would be there to give us the time koob honto be y dad's bed. even for the grandchildren, it was a wonderful moment. we tried to explain that people were outside singing, putting cards and flowers. i do believe he heard. even this last week, i don't know what was seen with the doctors, he hadn't opened his eye eyes. >> we see winnie mandela giving hugs -- president mandela's wife -- finding love late. the president of mozambique who was killed, dr. frasier. this was a real match and a woman who married two presidents. >> absolutely. and some would say that in fact the president of mozambique and nelson mandela competed over her. very early in their -- their youthful days. so i guess -- >> before he went -- >> yeah. exactly. so that's the story that's told in south africa. but she's a woman of tremendous substance. she was in fact the minister of education in mozambique. she became head of the commission of the u.n. on women and children in conflict, and she even today is a member of the elders that goes in and helps to mediate conflict around the world. she's a woman of tremendous substance, a diplomate in her own right. in the last few years she stayed closer to home because her husband was failing in his health. i'm hopeful that she will get back on the world stage and, you know, take that, the lessons of nelson mandela of her own experience, life, to help mediate conflicts globally. >> it's important to notice that two powerful black women, bound together for their love of this great man, themselves were able to be kind and gracious and hospitalable to each other and not vish -- hospitable to each other and not viciously opposed to each other. it's an uncommon moment given reality tv. >> even though that was a bitter goes between nelson mandela and winnie at first, he did find a way to forgive her, too, later in life. there's a wonderful story told by his daughter where she comes in to greet the president, winnie stays and he says, "what are you doing? bring her inside." >> it's beautiful. if all of the lessons of your politics can't be applied to your personal life, the political is useless because democracy should foster the ability of people in their own spaces to have common dignity and grace, as well. >> we're seeing mahmoud abbas, head of the palestinian authority, come in now. a man also close to mandela's heart. >> it was. he always talked about the palestinians. i remember he chastised president bush in 2001 saying that when president bush went to the arab world, he disappointed many because he didn't meet with arafat. of course, president bush wasn't going to do that. he came back and made his arguments about the conditions for moving forward in the middle east. but the same president mandela often talked to president clinton about the palestinian cause, as well. but in those meetings, he was always very clear that he was not anti-israel. you know, he was not anti-jewish. but he just felt that the condition of the palestinians needed to be improved, needed to have, you know, a world focus. i also would say that nelson mandela was very loyal. so those movement, those leaders who supported the anc in the darkest days when the united states and u.k. and others in the west who were not supportive, never forgot them. cuba, libya, the palestinians were all allies during those dark days. and he stayed true to them. >> had a long personal relationship with hillary clinton, as well. they first met in 1992. democratic convention. we see him there with queen elizabeth. probably one of the only people in the world who would pick up the phone and say, "hi, elizabeth, how you doing?" would not call her queen. i want to go to the stadium. terry mower ar moran, set the s. >> reporter: there's no question this is a grand, global event. we do have some boos, as expected, with some of the leaders coming in. it's a grand event and a personal one, as well. there's no question that the people here, you see it now, about half full. about 40,000 people or so who are here. we came in on the train this morning with many, many people, very festive situation here. [ booing ] >> reporter: see who they're booing. so many people said, "i had to be here after what this man did for me in my life." not "i admired him," not "i voted for him," not "i supported him," but "he changed my life. i wouldn't have the opportunity that i have today. i wouldn't have the sense of pride and equality i have today if it were not for what this man gave to me, sacrificed for me." we hear that all the time here. and out around the countryside. and not just from black people. i spoke with an afrikaner farmer who had been the victim of an attack, a lash of attacks, violent crime on the rise in this country. this man had been shot in the back, three assailants, all black. i wanted to get his take on nelson mandela and the coming era. when i mentioned mandela, this big dairy farmer, afrikaner man, teared up and started crying. he said, "nelson mandela changed my life. i was raised to hate mandela," he said. "but then i changed. i realized it was we who were in prison, and he had freed us." >> he believed that africa would only succeed if afrikaners truly felt part of the society. >> reporter: no question about it. they that remained a challenge. you do feel a spiritual kinship with the country. both diverse nations. we come from all over the planet as americans. people from europe come -- their heritage. all over africa. we are diverse in our racial lines, religious lines, tribal lines, racial lines, and the question is can we make it work, the same question that they faced here. there is question about the revolutionary anc, can they become a truly governing party of a multi- racial nation. the other day, i had the chance to meet with 20 young south africans, all black except one, who were 18 to 25. i asked them, raise your hand, how many of you think the government of this country, as you look ahead to plan your life and career, how many of you think the government of this country is on your side and how many of you think they're out for themselves. almost every single one said they think the current government is out for themselves. that's the challenge now going forward after the mandela era. ♪ >> dr. frasier, you know, we saw there the man who's one of the leaders of this program, the former secretary general of the anc, become a wealthy man the last several years. one of the people we see there who could grow into it was -- >> interestingly, he was a labor leader, a strong star to the anc, and the choice of president mandela to succeed him. he actually wanted the businessman, he continues to have very strong ties with the labor movement. part of the group that governs with the anc. so i think cyril can become the next president of south africa. >> you mentioned the clash between mandela and tumbecki over aids. there was an advocate for protection and investment in health care and other drugs. mbecki slow to come to that. >> the nelson mandela administration focused on aids before the 6664 campaign was focused on hiv and aids. mbecki felt as if he was treatitreat i -- as though south africa was more promiscuous and wanted to treat it as morality rather than poverty. i think in some ways his pride got in the way of his response to this challenge. he was uncomfortable talking about sex. he was uncomfortable talking about what needed to be done in terms of practicing to prevent it. >> and a hurdle more mandela, as well, dr. dyson. >> sure. but the remarkable thing was his constant revolution. in the autobiography of "malcolm x," he says in a poignant phrase, "they won't let me turn the corner," speaking of his own followers, "they want to trap me where i am." nelson mandela confronted this tire willy, deliberately chose to think outside the box. the circumstance forced him to. certain thing forced him into a different position. the reality is that he was open-minded. and i think mutombo, people don't realize that he was one of the few with his father that manned didn't have the most charitable of relationships shall we say. i think the tension between them but also passion and science on one hand. you could be resistive to the west but could perpetuate legacies and stereotypes within your own tribe. ♪ >> the national anthem of south africa. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ cheers ] >> the national anthem of south africa sung at the memorial service for nelson mandela at the smb stadium in johannesburg. the eyes of the world on that stadium this morning as so many come together to celebrate nelson mandela. as we approach 5:00 a.m. on the east. the ceremony getting underway, tremendous rain. the former secretary general of the african national congress, close ally of nelson mandela, opening the program right now. >> deputy president, former president -- [ cheers ] >> former president mbecki -- >> he is greeting the world leader. as we said, so many leaders, more than 100 world leaders there in south africa today. we've seen them streaming in all morning including, of course, four american presidents, president obama on air force one earlier today. traveling throughout monday, 17-hour flight, coming off air force one with the first lady. there is laura bush and former president george w. bush. secretary of state clinton joining them on air force one, as well, for the long flight. as we said earlier, they reconfigured a little bit. secretary clinton taking over the chief of staff's cabinet. the president has his own apartment up front. presidents jimmy carter and former president clinton getting there on their own this morning. they will all be there today to celebrate nelson mandela. shortly we will be hearing from president obama as we see the mandela family right there. that is nelson mandela's grandson who is now seen as the read of the family, seeing tribal responsibilities. the family gathered outside of noond's home in johannesburg. and they are coming together to celebrate nelson mandela today. this memorial service will go on for several hours here in south africa, and then his body will be taken to pretoria where he will lie in state for three days before the funeral on sunday in his homeland. let's go back. >> a dignified and fitting memorial service in honor of our father, nelson mandela. >> winnie mandela there, former wife of nelson mandela. and his current wife, his second wife there, as well. third wife, excuse me. >> we applaud you and thank you for that. on behalf of the president, i welcome all of you who have travelled from all corners of the world and extend warm words of wisdom from friends all over the world, and let us give nelson mandela's friends as well as the friends of south africa, from all over the world, a round of south african warm welcome and say thank you for coming. [ cheering and applause ] >> i also welcome those in south africa and those around the world who cannot come but are watching the proceedings on television. we have more than 100 country represented here today easily representing millions arounded world who are bidding farewell to nelson mandela. we say thank you for that. i apologize for the rain. we were not able to stop the rain, but this is how nelson mandela would have wanted to be sent off. these are blessings in our african tradition. when it rains when you are buried, it mean that your god is welcoming you, and the gates of heaven are most probably open, as well. [ cheers ] >> today we reflect on our collective memories of nelson mandela, father of our nation and founding father of our democracy. this occasion should make all of us pause today in respect of the life of nelson mandela. today's memorial -- >> dr. dyson, we're talking about the african blessing, mentioned earlier, as well. we'll be hearing later from a methodist minister. but nelson mandela even though a great moral area, not a particularly religious man. >> yeah, to his credit. religious confrontation that was brought about, he's like the present pope, an amazingly spiritual figure. nelson mandela is not a religious guy, but the moral temperature that he radiated was of a deeply spiritual character. spiritual means, look, i recognize that i'm a citizen on this planet with other people, i have to share space, and i have to share community and have to share love. and i have to share struggle. in that sense he forged the bonds more perfectly and perhaps more efficient ly than some religions due. even if it wasn't raining, perhaps it's global colored people time that represent the african and african-american and black global traditions for the sense of spirit to guide the proceeding there, the -- not even the death of this man with k interrupt that deepening tradition. >> byron pitt, talk more about the tradition. is that joy being. by everyone in the -- is that joy being felt by everyone in the stadium today? >> reporter: absolutely, george. people are smiling. one guy said, "look, if it rains i'm here, if it hails, i'm here. if there's a hurricane, i'll still be here." about the rain, in african culture, there's a belief that if it's raining on the day of someone's funeral, it is a sign that they lived a blessed life. many people hoping, george, it will rain even harder than it's raining now. something that you can't see, but in many ways, you guys have a better seat than people here. there's no huge jumbotron. people in the cheap seats -- [ inaudible ] people milling around. in the hallways, we talked about freedom in south africa. you also see a great deal of free enterprise. during apartheid, blacks were not allowed to own their own business. now they take great pride in owning their own business. people are selling shirts. at his ranch, there are women making food in the rain. cooking chickens, steaks. the line is long to get food. it smells good. >> i bet it's going to be a long day. the programs, filled by the leaders who will want to pay tribute to nelson mandela today. and terry moran, you're also in the stadium. i know so many went through hardship to get there. many also choosing to stay home because of the security roadblocks and rain. it is very difficult to get there today. >> reporter: it is difficult. they had shut down a lot of the street and instructed people that the basic way to get here was by train, as we did, just around dawn. people flowing on to the train, or by bus, or you could walk. and so a steady, drenching, soaking rain that appeared to be a challenge for a lot of people. once again, people were making the effort, came with the spirit of joy that you sensed in this place. people are here because they needed to be. nothing of going to stop them, not the security hassles, rain, nothing. it is filling up, although there are a lot of empty seats, this is a vast place. 94,000 capacity. there's more than 50,000 people here. that's a pretty good turnout for a funeral. >> as you were saying, even 40,000, a number right now, pretty tremendous. >> yeah. that's amazing. i mean, you know you're a great man when people are disappointed that only 40,000 showed up at your funeral, although they continue to stream in. and it's remarkable that the funeral itself is an act of state, so to speak, that unifies people. not only within south africa, but 100 leader from around the world. even in death, nelson mandela is forging connections and drawing a line. >> we're seeing that ecumenical spirit there on the podium. the rabbi now offering a blessing, as well. >> the soul of mandela gathered for his people. remember the righteousness that was done. remember how he exemplified the finest qualities of your servant choices, about whose great leadership, generosity of spirit, and powers of forgive not we read in your hebrew bible. joseph, the son of jacob, the son of isaac, the son of abraham -- >> the bishop of south africa there. as we listen to the prayers, how did it become the multicultural country that nelson mandela wanted? >> it's multicultural by natural in the demographics. it's not the nonracial. it's from the point of view of the equality of all citizens. and that really has to do very much with an economic divide that continues to persist. as well as the element that create that economic divide. townships are divided bay houses. there are educational discrepancies between the community. i think that there's still more work, significant work to do to make it nonracial in the sense of equal opportunity for all. that was also mary robinson, next to archbishop tutu. and those two are part of the elders. >> pain on him and so many millions of others in order that our diverse south african family would not be -- >> a reminder from the rabbi of the pain inflicted on nelson mandela, as dr. frasier was talking about, earlier. those years in prison. he survived. in some ways he thrived. his spirit thrived. very tough on his body. >> oh, my god. yeah. the endurance that he had -- and he was a world-class athlete in the sense of the kind of rigor that he endured and put himself through. my lord, to have to endure that physical labor and the punishment, untold punishment, reprisal of the guards there. they eventually, of course, grew to appreciate and respect mandela, but initially for those years to endure the hardship and physical labor crew had a horrible effect on the body. sort of like when you see black men from a certain generation who couldn't stop to use the bathroom because they were traveling from north to south and their bladders were messed up. imagine that 50-fold to what happened to those men's bodies. yet because of his extraordinary discipline, here's a man who in spite of that lived to 95 years old. >> we remember that. despite the punishment inflicted by the jailers, came out of prison and one of the first act he had was to forgive them and invite them to his inauguration as president. >> reporter: george, that's right. he forgave them by the end. but from day one, nelson mandela demanded that they respect him. his first day on robben island, as he and his colleagues walked in, they tell the story that a number of the guards yelled a derogatory word for blacks in south africa. equivalent to the "n" word in the united states. mandela in chains stopped, turns to the guard and said, "no. no. that's not when we are." and told the men, "do not respond to that word. that's not who we are." one of the men turned and said, "madiba, do you know where we are?" he said, "i do. but we must teach them who we are." and it continues. in prison early on, blacks, coloreds, indians were allowed to wear long pants. blacks had to wear short, to take away their dignity, treat them as they were boys. in his first weeks in prison, mandela went to the warden and said, "we want long pants." he said, "no, i'm the warden." mandela said, "i'm a lawyer, we want long pant." eventually they got long pants. it took six years, though, george, to get the prison to allow the black prisoners to have that. >> fascinating story, byron. thank you. president carter arrived. he traveled separately. we see him there. dr. frasier, of course, president carter in office as the anti-apartheid movement took hold here in the united states. and diverted so much of his post presidency i to the problems plaguing. >> particularly he's been very good on the tsetse fly that causes river blindness. and also on democratic elections. he's been the carter center that he founded has been forceful in terms of fielding monitors and observers to make sure that these elections are going well. >> and the president you worked for, president george w. bush, traveled there with president clinton. one of his enduring successes, that commitment he made to fight aids around the world through the campaign. bipartisan support. is really making a difference across the continent. >> it is indeed. it has turned around the aids pandemic. it used to be an absolute death sentence. now because of the introduction of anti-rhett viral druetro vi- viral drugs, people are living for a long time. kocondoleezza rice used to see child who lives with a parent for very long in their life was more visible than one who lost a parent. and the president of nigeria committed $100 million to the global fund within four months of his presidency. >> we saw the pictures of nelson mandela with president clinton. let's talk about that. quite a remarkable relationship there, as well. they first met, i believe, at the 1992 democratic convention after nelson mandela, elected president in 1994, gets his first state dinner at the white house with president clinton and he became quite a comfort to president clinton in his darkest days of impeachment. they went back to robben island. we see them there as well as the president said the other day, this became a true friendship. >> it was an extraordinary friendship. he stood by him during his darkest hours -- >> scolded congress over him. >> sure did. he turned and looked at him and supported him and gave his life. that's the sense earlier about his loyalty. as they say? tennessee, "dance with the ones that brungu." he understood loyalty because it's helpful time of distress. you don't need loyalty when he things are fine. you need loyalty when he thing are difficult. >> it's funny when you say that. i was talking to president clinton about the loyalty. president mandela would often tease him or the other way around, president clinton would tease president mandela about his loyalty to fidel castro. and he would stand by his friends, whatever their political persuasion. they shared political principles, as well. terry, anything to say on that? terry moran, are you still with us, more on the relationship -- [ inaudible ] >> reporter: i am. there's no question that clinton and mandela share a gift of friendship. and i think that nelson mandela recognized in him an ability that he had in american politics and politics around the world to transcend differences, it seemed in his art, in his person. he was a natural cross cultural, cross racial friend to many, many people. people saw that, he is still an enormously popular person around the world. the most popular former president, no question about it. people sense in bill clinton that knack for connecting crass divisions. we're in an age of globalization, the greatest challenge in our lives and children's lives is are we going to be able to cross the boundaries and be friends and cooperate and make the world a better place. clinton, whatever his policy records, seems to many people -- and i think to nelson mandela, as well, as a guy who in himself naturally crosses the lines, cheerfully. and they formed a very close friendship. >> close relationship. we saw the pictures at the state dinner earlier with secretary of state clinton who went to south africa several times, even brought chelsea clinton. you were talking about mary robinson, as well, dr. frash. how did nelson mandela's equal right for all extend to equal right for women? >> i never saw a difference. >> i never saw him differentiate, his greatest tribute. he took everybody their own terms, on their own merit, and i think that he, you know, embraced all. so i actually never saw him treat women or men in any different way. >> did you see the tension in the relationship in we talked about with president bush the differences over the war in iraq. he also was persistent in pressing both president clinton and president bush. he was constantly reminding american presidents they had to do more for africa. >> yes. it's something. when we were talking about the special relationship between mandela and clinton, i remember being this when president mandela was trying to get president clinton to come to the peace talks on burundi. he was a mediator. he wanted president clinton to come. the national security adviser, sandy berger, didn't think it rose to a priority for the preside president, it came to negotiations. he was very much opposed to it. clinton couldn't resist mandela. mandela asked, clinton was going to do. it sure enough, three months, four months later, clinton was there standing next to president mandela overseeing the talks. >> tremendously persuasive man. >> yeah. i think they were two bird of the same feather. you know, there was -- i don't know who said it, said that the difference between obama and clinton, that clinton is the dog. 99 people in the room, one doesn't like you, the dog is going to go, "why don't you like me?" forget the 99 who love you. whereas the cat goes, "i'm good. you laike me, you don't. i'm all right." >> let's talk about the relationship between president obama and nelson mandela. we've seen that pretty iconic photo. then-senator obama meeting nelson mandela when he came to washington. and you see them there. mandela frail. president obama leaning down to greet him. as a sitting president, he wrote the forward to nelson mandela's book. he considered it a great honor to be asked to write the forward to the book. you mentioned the joshua generation. president obama considered part of the joshua generation here in the united states. he was fired by the example of nelson mandela. even though they probably personally have great differences. >> yeah. no doubt. i think that the inspiration of an icon is extraordinary. obama taps into the spirit, the global recognition of this man's greatness. it's an irvisitable force. in terms of policy, ironically enough -- irresistible force. in terms of policy, ironically enough, he may have had more in common with george than president obama, who was chastised -- in reference to leadership and corruption, but a distancing operation that some critics in america have detected in his relationship to african-americans. so it's not just a local black thing, it's a global black thing. and there's been a tense relationship between president obama in that sense. while he embraces nelson mandela as an iconic figure, the on-the-ground politics would suggest a great deal of tension there, and that the approach of nelson mandela was far more courageous in reaching out to those who had been despised and to embrace them even as he challenges them than the tough love approach of barack obama. >> and you can feel, jonathan carl, our chief white house correspondent in washington, that the example of nelson mandela humbled president obama. he always bristles when people compare the two as the first elected black presidents of the countries because as he said so many times, he cannot match the kind of sacrifices that nelson mandela made for his country. >> that's exactly right, george. and he wrote in that forward to mandela's book that it was mandela who awakened him to the outside world. as we said, it was the first political speech that nelson mandela gave as a young college student in california, he was inspired by mandela. it was an anti-apartheid protest. but when mandela died and the president came out to give his statement in the briefing room, he said that he was one of the many millions who had been inspired by nelson mandela to get involved and try in some way to make the world a better place. always resisting the comparison but making it clear that it was mandela in many ways that made it possible for us to have a president obama because it was mandela who inspired obama to get involved in politics in the first place. >> in the remarks that he gave, the first remarks that he gave, he likened -- echoed president lincoln when he said now that nelson mandela belongs it the ages, the final words at lincoln's bedside, as well. what more do we know about what the president might be saying today? i know that he worked on a speech on that long flight to south africa overnight. >> this was something he had been working on for some time given, of course, that they haeb prepa -- they had been preparing for this day. mandela appeared in very bad condition and near death when obama visited africa over the summer. this was not a speech the president started, we're told. he was preparing to come over for this trip. i expect we're going to hear about mandela's -- mandela's inspiration for the world. i think a little personal from president obama. i have to say, hearing the president when he came out in the briefing room after we learned that mandela had died, was some of the most heartfelt, inspirational words we had heard from the president in some time. obviously he's been going through a rough patch politically here at home, this was obama in a very personal way, in a way that we hadn't heard in some time. >> jonathan karl mentioned the speech the president gave at oxidental college. dr. dyson, so many american of that generation, of our generation, this was in some ways the post vietnam era. this became an issue that sparked activist. >> exactly right. it was people's introduction into the world of politics. and college campuses were aflame. you know, before this was the "me" generation, of the narcissism that was, you know, taking hold in the '70s, as we heard it it. obama and others of our generation said, no, we will not give in to or capitulate to the stereotype that we're different, we're all about ourselves. and this issue provided the perfect entree into dealing with politics and also to rallying for a cause that was not simply local but global and international. >> time of joy and celebration. south africa, let's listen. ♪ [ cheers ] ♪ [ speaking in native language ] >> and as we hear the response in that stadium right now -- madiba. >> what you hear in the stadium, and as we've heard it all morning and we hear it in the churches across south africa is the most astonishing choral music i've heard. that particular song, as we heard on playgrounds, we heard elsewhere, isaa they sing o-- i they sing his name and praise him. there is no one like him. he is our father. you hear the stage the most remarkable thing. people taking up harmony points, even counter points on their own. this magnificent choral singing that comes out of the culture of south africa is one of the great, great cultural monument here in this song to nelson mandela. highway loved -- he loved it. this was a revolution movement, a revolution in song. and it continues to be a nation that sings its joy and morals. >> at the podium -- having trouble with the transmission there. at the podium right now, the political activist with nelson mandela in robben island. [ inaudible ] >> he was sentenced to prison in robben island. he was released after negotiations between the african national congress and the government. [ cheers ] >> go ahead, terry. >> reporter: i just wanted to let you know that the crowd is following this with incredible attention at the same time as byron pointed out in the upper deck which is sheltered from the rain as they're preparing meals and living today -- they have come here for the duration, to celebrate this man. and to listen to what their leaders and the world leaders have to say. this is a moment to take ownership. they're grading these guys, no question about it. you can sense the response that each of these speaker get as they come to the podium and as they leave. so it's a soccer stadium, a moment of celebration for the life of nelson mandela. and it's a political moment, too, for the people of south africa. >> let's try again to listen to the former prisoner with nelson mandela on robben island. [ cheers ] >> i'm overjoyed by the outpouring of love and adulat n adulation. madiba, you are looking down w now, and we know, and there is no doubt as men and women unite and celebrate his life and legacy. [ inaudible ] >> rain causing an awful lot of problems, dr. dyson. of course one thing spoken to is the tremendous solidarity between nelson mandela and his -- those people who share themselves with him -- >> he could have played it high, he could have been the prima donna, he could have been the diva, no. he insisted that his fate be the fate of the group and that the group's fate be his so that they could enjoy together whatever sacrifices would bring them, and in do together whatever penalty would be imposed. it's an extraordinary mark of nelson mandela's, again, sense of loyally that he would stick with these -- loyalty that he would stick with these men. >> because of that leadership, no real question once he was released from prison that he would become the leader of the nation. >> no question at all. i think that the anc had effectively mobilized around his image as the leader of the movement, as the moral leader. so the global "free mandela" campaign was not by chance. it was an orchestrated political act. so he was indeed the designated leader of the party when he came out. >> do you know at what moment is became so clear? >> i think winnie mandela had quite a lot to do with it. i think people underestimate the role that winnie mandela played in keeping mandela's name out there, keeping him in the forefront of the movement. remember, she also was banned. as his wife was seen as such. the head of already the anc youth league, he was the head of the armed wing. he had taken a leadership position in the party very early, from the '40s even, and through the '60s to tell his imprisonment. he could have easily been forgotten. >> the free nelson mandela movement also had part in our popular culture. >> it absolutely did. postcards, banners, people carried along the placards, but i want to reinforce the point that similar to nelson mandela, who was living but in prison, when dr. king died, he was not any more one of the ten most admired americans. many universities didn't want to have him lecture. no american book company really wanted to publish one of his books. he couldn't even get on the board of trustee of his own college until two years before he died. sure, morta martyrdom swept awa allegations. but loretta scott king ensured that he would have a national holiday and memorialization. i think the same with winnie mandela, that she did extraordinary work. there's been a gender attack on her that i think has been subversive and unfortunate. yes, there are things about her that we can be extremely critical. but to appreciate the extraordinary work she had to do, her suffering in prison, of brutalized and stood up in a very powerful way to make sure that nelson mandela, the image and the icon, would carry the work of their movement forward. >> so many sacrifices by winnie mandela, as well, byron pitts in the stadium right now. how are they reacting to the speakers so far? >> reporter: i think people are paying attention. the audio is difficult. talking about winnie mandela, in the streets of south africa, the people who adore her and the people who despise her because of the issues you sdwruftsed. she clearly -- discussed. she clearly was part of nelson mandela's success. she kept the movement alive. this is a woman -- consider this. she's 60 years younger. when they married, she was 21 years old. when mandela brought her to her first anc meeting, she was a social worker. a lot of older women in the movement balked and said, "why bring her? she's too pretty to be a freedom fighter." she grew into the role. this woman spent 461 days in pris prison. she and mandela were married four years before he went to prison. in those four years they were only together for about 15 months. the rest of the time he was in detention. he was -- oftentimes -- oftentimes people who speak of soweto speak of where he lived. in a way this is winnie mandela's, the life she gave south africa. >> it's a great point because i think people have tended to erase her from the picture because of her complications. this is what happens when you live outside -- when you live longer than whatever use your image is put to. so winnie mandela h
CBS
Dec 8, 2013 8:30am PST
>> schieffer: today on "face the nation," the world remembers nelson mandela. thousands are turning out in his country as south africa holds a national day of prayer to honor the man they call mondiva the father of modern south africa. we'll talk to friends and followers of the former president who died last week at the age of 95. that and the other news of the day on "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning again, the storm that left parts of the south and midwest in an icy deep freeze is now moved east, it's expected to hit virginia and mid atlantic states today then move up the east coast towards boston and new york. we begin this morning in south africa where debra begins our coverage of the day of national prayer for nelson mandela. >> good morning, bob. well this being a multi-faced country we saw many church services around the country today part of the national day of prayer and reflection nor nelson mandela. in the very famous regina muda during the anti-apartheid struggle a large service there this morning, the guiding light of this country. also prayer service at a m
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 12:00pm EST
people are remembers nelson mandela. there is mourning. but also celebration for the life of a man who changed a nation and became a global icon by sheer force of character. there will be public remembrances for the next week and a half culminating in a state funeral. nick reports from johannesberg. >> reporter: for south africans today is for mourning. madeba as he was known widely was the father of this country. >> somehow we believe that [ inaudible ] but we'll have to accept the humble request of [ inaudible ] to come together and mourn. >> reporter: he might have been sick for a long time, but people here are still shocked. they have lost a revolutionary leader. >> even though one knew that this day would come because of his age, there still is a huge sense of loss, a deep sense of emptiness. >> reporter: in a black village about 30 miles from here where he and his wife lived young and old, white and black remembered his generation of spirit. >> i'm just glad he did all he did for us, and hopefully we continue the legacy as the youth and the remaining africans. >>> president o
CBS
Dec 10, 2013 4:00am PST
africans the anger born of 1,000 stripes, 1,000 indignities, 1,000 unremembered moments to fight the system that imprisoned my people, he said. but like other early giants, the sisulus and the tambos, madiba disciplined his anger and challenged his desire to fight in the organization and platform and strategy for action so men and women could stand up for their god-given dignity. moreover, he accepted the consequences of his actions, knowing that standing up to powerful interests and injustice carries a price. i have fought against wlhite domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the idea of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and equal opportunity. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and achieve but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. mandela taught us the power of action but he also taught us the power of ideas, the importance of reason and argument, the need to study not only those who you agree with but also those who you don't agree with. he understood that ideas cannot be contained by prison walls or extinguished by a sniper's bullet. he turned his trial into an indictment of apartheid because of his eloquence and passion and his training as an advocate. he used decades of prison to sharpen his arguments but also to spread his thirst for knowledge to others in the movement. he learned the language and the customs of his oppress sorors s that he might better convey how their own freedom depended upon him. mandela demonstrated that action, that ideas are not enough, no matter how right they must also be chiseled in the law and institution. he was practical, testing his beliefs against the harsh surface of circumstance and history, encore principles, he was unyielding, which is why he could rebuff offers of unconditional relief, reminding the apartheid regime that prisoners cannot enter into contracts. as he showed in painstaking negotiations, the transfer of power and draft through law, he was not afraid to compromise for the sake of a larger goal. because he was not only a leader of a movement but a skillful politician, the constitution that emerged was worthy of this multi-racial democracy, true to his vision of laws that protect minority as well as majority rights and the precious freedom of every south african. finally, mandela understood the ties that bind the human spirit. there is a word in south africa, ubuntu. a word that captures his greatest gifts, his recognition that we are all bound together in a way that is invisible to humanity, that there is a oneness to humanity, that we achieve ourselves by sharing ourselves with others and caring for those around us. we can never know how much of this sense was innate in him or how much was shaped in a dark and solitary cell. but we remember the gestures, large and small, introducing a jailor as an honored guest in his inauguration, taking a pitch in a uniform, turning his family's heartbreak into a call to confront hiv/aids that reveal the depth of his empathy and understanding. he not only embodied ubuntu, he taught millions to find the truth within themselves. it took a man like madiba to free not just prisoner but the jailor as well. to show that you must trust others so that they may trust you. teach that reconciliation is not a matter of ignoring a cruel past but a means of confronting it with inclusion and generosity and proof. he changed laws but he also changed hearts. for the people of south africa. for those he inspired around the globe, madiba's passing is rightly a time of mourning and a time to celebrate a heroic life. i believe it will also prompt in each of us a time for self-reflection, with honesty, regardless of our station or our circumstance. we must ask, how well have i applied his lessons in my own life. that is the question i ask myself as a man and as a president. we know that like south africa, the united states had to overcome centuries of racial subrogation as was true here. it took sacrifice. the sacrifices of countless people known and unknown, to see the dawn of a new day. michelle and i are beneficiaries of that struggle. in america and in south africa and in countries all around the globe, we can not allow our progress to cloud the fact that our being able to come back and to forgive. and to reconcile and to build a nation. the evolution took place in him. >> we want to go to mark phillips who is about five miles away from this stadium where there is a huge overflow crowd of people that want to take part in this day. mark, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah. well, i'm in another stadium about five miles from the main one where the service is will be held. the whole intent here through this whole week of commemoration is one of making the celebration of nelson mandela's life accessible to people. it is a difficult place to get around the township surroundings of johannesburg. communications are not terribly well established. in order to accommodate people, this is a stadium called orlando, one of the big soccer teams plays here. people have come through this rain. what they say is, they could have stayed at home and watched it on tv or gone to their local cafe. they wanted to come out to be together. this is very much a week where the connection between nelson mandela, even though he has been out of public life for so long, even though he has been so frail and in decline for at least a year now. he still maintained direct connection to the people and they maintained a very close affection for him. so this is very much a question for them of coming out and expressing collectively the kind of feeling that you feel all over this country. this is the great leader of this country and one of the great leaders of the past century in the world. but you are struck at how personally people feel toward him. people will tell you, i owe everything to him. my kid is in university because of what he did. that kind of thing. people stop you on the ,,,, a picture of f.w. clark, the man that nelson mandela negotiated with to bring the end to apartheid watching as they worked hard and negotiated hard to bring an end to apartheid and the release of nelson mandela. >> reporter: that is very true. it's what you hear here. nelson mandela is not just a hero to black south africans which make up the vast majority of the country, he is a hero to everybody here, including the white south africans, the former white regime was a very brave one. they were forced into it by economic sanctions and other kinds of pressures and the moral rectitude of the battle that was being fault. his greatest gift he was being remembered for was not just long walk to freedom, the long fight for liberation but the reconciliation he saw afterwards, bringing everybody into the fold, saying this was and is a country for everybody. the inequality economically and socially is much less than it used to be. a lot of brave people coming together here on this very historic day. >> mark phillips, we thank you. as you point out and everyone knows, he has been out of public view for a very long time but he was still considered the moral compass of this country. everybody knew that nelson mandela, even though we knew he was frail and fragile, everyone thought of him as the moral compass. out of this sadness comes opportunity. what will the people of south africa do with this. can you talk about that, john? >> reporter: can you roux he pete that? >> i was talking about nelson mandela being the moral compass of the country even though he has been out of view for some time. people still knew he was somehow still in charge and in control. >> reporter: he is the moral compass and precisely the fact that he has been out of the public eye, out of politics. he may be like the moral conscious of this country for many years to come. specially it is already right now this unexpected memorial service. the camera pans on to the current president. when his name is mentioned, clearly, what they are booing is looking at where he stands relative to the moral compass that nelson mandela fought for for the country. they think that he is wavering from that course. you are seeing it in action right now at mandela's funeral. you are seeing that the moral compass is in action live. >> john, this is charlie rose. there was also, as you have pointed out, nelson mandela's understanding that they had to surprise people when he made the commitment he did to the rugby team famously saying, we have to do this, because we have to surprise them and show them who we are. >> reporter: this element of surprise is a big thing. i think that we are having a massive surprise right here at this very minute in the way this funeral is a massive political event. you mentioned that the famous rugby final. there is no one on the political horizon in south africa and certainly not president zuma, who is capable of turning people around, of transforming the mood of the country the way they were able to with that extraordinary mastery of political leadership and persuasion that he has. it is really, really fascinating. mandela's moral weight moving very heavily over this event and the current government. >> john, you point out his moral weight. you see the people there in a celebration, dancing for nelson, i see many toy-toy moves. nelson mandela would do that. you couldn't help but smile when you saw him doing that little chicken wing movement with his arms. many times in africa, people laugh and sing and dance through their sadness and their sorrow. these are people celebrating nelson mandela's life. if you didn't know this was a funeral, he would not know this was a funeral. they are in a stadium. a lot of cheering. people are very happy on this particular day to give what they call the old man a long good-bye. we are in the process of a ten-day funeral service for nelson mandela. >> you always hope at a time like this, that this will somehow cause a recognition of the possibilities of south africa that nelson mandela dreamed of. >> people will tell you there is still work to do in south africa. everyone knows there is still work to do. we will see it remains to be seen what will happen after the death of nelson mandela in this country. bill whittaker is inside the stadium. i know the weather is very dreary. a friend says, that's why we have umbrellas, nobody seems to mind this very drizzly weather there today. hello, bill whittaker. >> the president is making his way under the umbrella as he makes hi way. >> reporter: you see president obama making his way to the stage now. it is one of the highlights, if not the highlight, of this day. people have been waiting to hear president obama's speech. as he said earlier, when he came in, the crowd went wild cheering. now, the moment has come. he is greeting all of the other dignitaries, ban ki-moon. obama has said that nelson mandela was one of his heroes. i think it is fair to say that president obama is a hero to many of the south africans. they see in him something like some of what nelson mandela was like. a nation as large and powerful as the united states is. they see that in president obama. >> president obama is shaking many of these world leaders and dignitaries and shaking the hand of raul castro and others. >> on sunday, when we were at the kennedy center, i saw some who wrote the biography, mandela's way. and you can watch streaming video of mandela's memorial service on cbs news.com. that's the cbs news for this tuesday, i'm ann marie green. have a great day. arrived and president zuma, president of the country, was booed. that's a very interesting dynamic. >> this is a famous gospel song, and i'm frank mallicoat time is 4-- here >>> good morning everyone, it's tuesday, december 10th. i'm michelle griego. >> hi everyone, i'm frank mallicoat. nearly 4:30 on your tuesday and lout the door and -- out with door with a little traffic and weather. let's get it going. >> we're back in the deep freeze again this morning. it has been day after day of very cold temperatures down to 26 in concord right now. 24 in napa. and 24 degrees in santa vow s. the good news -- rosa. the good news is the cold snap will soon come to anened. >> thank god for seat warmers. >>> everything is good coming into san francisco. but we're getting word of a new accident on the opposite end. southbound 101 near eastbound 80. all the details on that coming up. >> thank you liz. >>> well happening right now, tens ofthousands of people and several world leaders including president obama honoring nelson mandela in south africa. you're looking at live pictures from the world cup soccer stadium in sew wee toe. the people who braved the weather danced and sang in the rain today. during the speech, president obama urged to world to act on mandela's legacy. >> around the world today, men and women are still in prison
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 12:35am PST
lady to hold oh-oh-oh ♪ ♪ it's a southern summer that sun's shinin' down like daddy's silver dollar ♪ ♪ gotta hop on the old dirt road to the days of gold oh-oh-oh ♪ ♪ a little bit of you little bit of me what you wanna do what's it gonna be ♪ ♪ we can get wild we can live free or you can shake it for me baby like a tambourine ♪ ♪ a slice of watermelon and you spit the seed sweat on your back stickin' to the seat ♪ ♪ we can sneak off to beat the heat i'll be buzzin on you honey like a bumble bee ♪ ♪ yeah it's a southern summer whiskey's in the air dogs on the burner ♪ ♪ beer's ice cold got ta pretty little lady to hold oh-oh-oh ♪ ♪ it's a southern summer that sun's shinin' down like daddy's silver dollar ♪ ♪ gotta hop on the old dirt road to the days of gold ♪ ♪ ♪ thought it was safe to go outside but i guess i was wrong ♪ ♪ thought i could take a little ride just to see what was going on ♪ ♪ >>> tonight on a special edition of "nightline." nelson mandela. freedom fighter, leader, a symbol of racial equality. the man who changed his country and the world has died at age 95. tonight, we're live on the ground in south africa. from his long walk to freedom -- >> tonight we have only one guest, nelson mandela. >> -- "nightline" was there. >> to spend so many years at the prime of your life is a tragedy. >> how a young boxer fought his way through nearly 30 years in prison to become his country's first democratic elected president. >> he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> to his magnetic sense of humor, mandela was loved by everyone. from world leaders to celebrities. when he visited the u.s., areeth that franklin sang to him. tonight she's with us sharing her special memories only on "nightline." >> this special edition of "nightline," nelson mandela, a man who changed the [s[man] no one told her,right?a. [son]hi! [mom screams] >>> this is a special edition of "nightline." nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. i'm dan abrahams. nelson mandela's face is one of the most recognizable in the world. and tonight in south africa this symbol of racial equality died at the age of 95. from boxer to advocate, prisoner to peace prize winner, it seemed mandela was always fighting for a cause greater than himself. as reactions pour in from around the globe it's clear that his legacy as a champion of human rights, equality and freedom will be forever etched in our minds and in history. from world leaders like president obama. >> like so many around the globe, i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live, i will do what i can to learn from him. >> to celebrities and mostly ordinary citizens of the world, an outpouring of love and mourning. abc's alex marquardt is live for us in johannesburg. alex? >> good evening, dan. a new day has dawned here in south africa. there's a profound sense of loss and mourning that has swept the entire country. what's really remarkable are celebrations like this one right outside mandela's home that we've seen spring up around the country. south africans marking the passing of this great man by celebrating his life. when the news broke tonight of mandela's death, south africans of all stripes flocked to mandela's home. young, old, white, black. ♪ they danced. they sang old songs of struggle from the apartheid era. >> i think we should celebrate what he has achieved and what he has given us. i wouldn't be free without him. >> reporter: but some who showed up to pay their respects were overcome with grief. >> i'm disappointed. i'm sad. but at the same time, i think he's had his part in life and he did it very well. >> reporter: these scenes swept across the country, growing into the wee hours of the morning after president jacob zuma broke the news to the nation and to the world. >> he's now at peace. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> reporter: trents to the man affectionately known as tata madiba immediately poured in. including from f.w. declerk, the last president of white supremacist south africa. "your spirit and example will always be there to guide us to the vision of a better and more just south africa." now ten days of national mourning will start, during which mandela will lie in state in the capital pretoria so south africans can say final good-byes before he's carried back to his ancestral village for burial. dan? >> thanks, alex. when nelson mandela walked out of prison in 1990, after nearly 30 years it represented much more than his personal freedom. it meant that he and all of those who fought so hard for him and his cause had finally won a major battle. but the broader fight was far from over. "nightline's" founding anchor ted koppel was there to speak with him soon after he was released. >> this is abc news "nightline," reporting from south africa, ted koppel. >> tonight we have only one guest, nelson mandela. most people would look at the last 27 years of your life and say to themselves, what a waste. what about you? >> that is true. to spend 27 years at the prime of your life is a tragedy. and i regret those years that i have wasted in prison. but there are very positive aspects too. because i had the opportunity to think about problems and to reflect on my mistakes. >> amazing. and over the years, mandela's special history with "nightline" continued. here's abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran on the man who helped change so much. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: it was a long walk nelson mandela took, a walk that lasted nearly a century, a walk to freedom and human dignity. a walk he ended up taking the whole world on along with him. >> on behalf of our rainbow nation, i welcome you all. >> reporter: nelson mandela towered over them. a moral and political leader of surpassing strength, implacable determination, and profound decency. >> i am a product of africa. and the long-cherished dream of a rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of our children may play in the sun. >> reporter: mandela was born in 1918 into the royal family of the tembu people, but he grew up under apartheid, the vicious system of racial segregation and oppression by which the white minority ruled south africa. it's hard today to imagine the pure evil of that system. abject poverty for blacks and severe restrictions on travel, education and employment. whites enjoyed all of the power and riches in this rich country. mandela's trouble name meant troublemaker, so perhaps it was his destiny. he quickly rose to prominence as a lawyer, founding the country's first black law firm, and leading agitator for change. especially after the terrible sharpville massacre in 1960 when he and the african national congress took up armed struggle. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government who is on this savage path against unarmed and defenseless people. >> reporter: mandela was a born leader. so in 1964 the apartheid government tried him for treason and sought the dead penalty. his opening statement to the court electrified the country. >> i have cherished the ideals of a democratic and free society. it is an idea for which i hope to live for and to see realized. but my lord, if it needs be, it is an idea for which i am prepared to die. >> reporter: mandela was sentenced to life imprisonment and sent to the notorious robben island prison. he was not heard from for nearly 30 years. he was just prisoner number 46664. the years passed in prison. mandela became a myth, a global symbol for the fight against apartheid. ♪ and then in 1990, the south african government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison on february 11, 1990, the world rejoiced. after his release, there was miraculously it seemed, no trace of bitterness for what he'd endured. but his resolve was unbroken. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: he worked with his former enemy, prime minister declerk, to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and declerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993, and then the following year, this. the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration, attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again have the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: mandela served only one five-year term, handing the reins to his vice president. the years had taken their toll. mandela and his wife winnie divorced in 1996 after a four-year separation. after leaving office, mandela took on the role of elder world statesman, fighting injustice not only in south africa but also in the rest of the world. he married his third wife and long-time companion grassa michelle on his 80th birthday and content at last made an effort to retreat from public life. >> don't call me. i'll call you. >> reporter: his public appearances became increasingly rare, each one of them a reason to celebrate. he was all smiles when his great grandchildren sang to him on his 92nd birthday. ♪ happy birthday to you when he closed his eyes for the last time, nelson mandela was surrounded by his family and by the affection and admiration of the world. he has truly fought the good fight, walked that long walk. a journey unfinished towards justice, peace, and love. and on that journey, which is after all the course of human history, we all follow in nelson mandela's footsteps. >> terry moran, thank you for that inspiring report. >>> next, what happened when mandela came to america? and we talk to the queen of soul who sang for him then. ♪ like the enticing aroma and distinctive taste of nespresso. elegant capsules meet masterfully crafted machines, and one touch creates the perfect coffee, cappuccino, and latte. ♪ tempt all your senses with one extraordinary coffee. 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[ male announcer ] discover the world of nespresso ...are the hands that do good things for the whole community: the environment, seniors, kids, and animals. that's why we created the share the love event. by the end of this year, the total donated by subaru could reach 35 million dollars. you get a great deal on a new subaru. we'll donate 250 dollars to a choice of charities that benefit your community. it feels good to be a helping hand. >>> nelson mandela fought a long battle for racial equality for his fellow south african countrym countrymen. but the impact of that effort was felt well beyond those borders, especially here in the united states. you met mr. mandela on his first visit to the united states. >> that's right. it was 23 years ago in boston. long before he chatted with a young reporter, this historic figure moved a nation. >> nelson mandela. >> reporter: for many who heard nelson mandela speak, it wasn't so much his orator skills -- >> nothing will stop our date with destiny. >> reporter: but the aura of a story that inspired. a story so familiar and intertwined with america's past and still so very painful. >> racism will not survive. >> reporter: it was just four months after he was set free from prison in 1990 that nelson mandel what set foot in america for the first time. an eight-city tour starting in new york. it was magical. it was as if malcolm or martin were still alive and the nets had won the world series, all in new york, all in one day. former new york mayor david dinkins was instrumental in making new york mandela's first stop in america. >> in my mind, mandela was ten feet tall. what nelson mandela was able to achieve demonstrated what in fact can occur. >> reporter: one american who like mandela knows the high price of equality, congressman john lewis. >> if nelson mandela can do it we can do it. >> reporter: tonight the movie about mandela's life "long walk to freedom" premiered in london. those who attended didn't know mandela had died until after. >> extremely sad and tragic news. >> reporter: the anti-apartheid protests of the '80s captivated a new generation on college campuses and communities. ♪ >> reporter: amidst the demonstrations demanding divestment in south africa here, the ongoing violence there in townships like soweta, it took the story of one man who help america better understand the struggle of one nation. mandela reminded the world reconciliation was more powerful than revenge. forgiveness is a gift to be given. >> i said didn't you hate the people when they let you go? he said, briefly i did. but when i was walking out of my compound for the last time i said to myself, they've had you 27 years. if you hate them when you get through that door, they will still have you. >> if you can proceed through life with just a portion of nelson mandela's humility, you will be a huge success. >> reporter: the audacity of mandela's rise also inspired a young politician from illinois. barack obama met nelson mandela when he was just a junior senator here in 2005. and years later his wife had the chance to tell mandela what he meant to her and the president. >> you cannot imagine how important your legacy is to who i am, to who my husband is. i just said, thank you, thank you, thank you. >> reporter: so back during his first visit there was little wonder why, watching a 71-year-old man dance could please so many. it was the walk that preceded it. when i met mr. mandela there was time for one question. mr. mandela, i asked, what is the one thing in life you know for sure? with that elegant smile he answered, good and evil are constantly at war. good men must choose. with defiance and dignity in equal measure. nelson mandela chose and america loved him for it. >> this was at 4:00 in the morning. >> that's right. >> thanks very much. appreciate it. we'll be right back. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. and this park is the inside of your body. see the special psyllium fiber in metamucil actually gels to trap some carbs to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. metamucil. 3 amazing benefits in 1 super fiber. 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[ cellphone beeps ] this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. ♪ >> people around the world remembering nelson mandela tonight including the queen of soul, aretha franklin. in 1990 she shared the stage with mandela at detroit's tigers stadium at a rally to celebrate his release from prison. i spoke with her tonight. ♪ mr. mandela >> it was tremendous. it was tremendous. there was a lot of excitement. electricity in the air. and he was truly one of the great, great heroes of our time. >> when we were in prison, we appreciated and obviously listened to the sound of detroit. motor town. >> his spirit and his ideals and his heart and soul could not be imprisoned. ♪ >> and you performed on mandel what day in 2009. if you were going to perform a tribute song to him now, do you know what it would be? >> "respect." no question about it. "respect." ♪ what you are baby i got ♪ what you need do you know i got it ♪ >> no question about it. nelson mandela is already one of the most quoted men on the planet. his words helped bring an end to apartheid and still inspire those fighting injustice today. >> we are here because you took the humane decision that you could not ignore. the inhumanity represented by the apartheid system. we have never doubted in our minds, even during the blackest hour, that eventually we would win. >> even as we celebrate, let us remind ourselves that our work is far from finished. where there is poverty and sickness, including ai,
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
>>> i cherish the idea. so help me god. >> remembering nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid activist and south african former president dies at 95. this morning he's being remembered as an icon of human rights. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. captioning funded by cbs >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for friday, december 6th, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this morning nelson mandela is being remembered for his resolve and ability to forgive, traits that helped peacefully end the brutal segregationist policy in his native south africa. south africa's first black president died yesterday at the age of 95 following a long illness. he was surrounded by his family. mandela's fight against apartheid made him an inspiration to millions, including president obama. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> when mandela died, crowds gathered throughout south africa to mourn his death a
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm PST
>> hello again, welcome to our special cover annual of the death of nelson mandela. >> welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. >> it is morning now in south africa. crowds have gathered outside the former president's home in johannesburg, he died peacefully on thursday, he was 95. >> mandela is known for freeing south africa and delivering it into the hands of democracy. president jacob zuma broke the news of his death. >> our thoughts are with the millions of people across the world who embraced mandela as their own and who saw his cause as their cause. this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. >> well, millions of people around the world are joining south africans in mourning the death of nelson mandela. let go live now to johannesburg. robyn curnow who has covered nelson mandela's career extensively. i guess the fact that he hasn't been president for 14 years him he has so many people out in the stheet streets. he remains in their hearts on this day. >> reporter: absolutely. you know, nelson mandela's life mirrored south africa's struggle for political freedom and i think that's why people feel so personally checked to him as well a deeply grateful for the role he played in freeing this nation and i think there is such a lesson to be learned from his leadership, because when you think about it, suffering and the kind of sacrifices nelson mandela made can embitter a person but, instead, with this man, it ennobled him. [ music playing ] nelson mandela's struggle for freedom defined his life. he was born in the remote hills of south africa's easton cape. he was given a name which means trouble maker. he was only given the name nelson by a school teacher later on. after moving to johannesburg and studying law, as a boxer, he became adepth at pecking fights and sparking fights with authorities which had increased against the black population. it was then mandela became the crucial struggle to launch american national congress's when. he was mill and the and a fire brand, defiantly burning his passbook, a dreaded document the authorities used to control the move him of south africa's black population. >> the africans require want a franchise on the basis of one man one vote. they want political independence. >> reporter: that simple demand and the efforts mandela took to fight for democracy eventually saw him and others tried for treason and sabotaged by the apartheid government, acts punishable by death. they were banished to robben island, one of the most brutal and isolated prisons. another political prisoner remembers the first time he saw mandela in a prison yard. >> i could see from the way he walked and from his conduct that here was a man already stamping his authority on prison regime. >> reporter: mandela was released 27 years later. >> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. your commitment and your discipline has released me to stand before you today. >> and his lack of bitterness towards the apartheid authorities helped him to lead one of the most remarkable political ran sixes of the 20th century, mandela, the trained lawyer and lifelong rebel outmaneuvered the apartheid leaders and he steered south africa's peaceful transition to democracy. he won a nobel peace prize together with his former enemy f.w. de klerk. >> and to deport myself for the wealthy of the republic and all its people. >> reporter: then he became south africa's first black president in 1994. >> so help me god. >> what marks mandela's career as president more, almost more than anything else, this is after five years, he stepped down. there have been very few presidents in africa who have given up willingly. >> don't call me. i'll call you [ music playing ] >> reporter: his time and years were busy for fundraising for charities close to his heart. he celebrated his 90th birthday with much fanfare and told cnn in a rare interview that looking back, he wouldn't do anything differently. >> i only regret it because the things that have triggered me were things that pleased my soul. >> now those who loved and respected him look to his legacy. >> and if we want to learn from him, then that life is not made up of straight victories, it is made up of mistakes, zigzags, stumbling, picking yourself up and dusting off the dirt. walking again forward. >> that is what mandela is. >> good-bye. >> reporter: now, a low, dark grey cloud is hanging over johannesburg this morning as people woke up to the news that nelson mandela had died overnight. there is a somber, grey feeling in this town and this country today, but i think many south africans also quietly pragmatic also thankful that he has been released from his suffering. south africans know that he hasn't been well and that he has been been in discomfort and they have been very worried that he has been in suffering, that he has been suffering, just remember, he has been on a ventilator for more than six months. he was on dialysis for kidney failure. we know he was receiving a lot of drugs and, you know, he was also, he was just not there anymore for much of in year and i think that pained those very close to him, it pained this nation knowing that he has gently over the years slipped away. so there is a collective sigh of relief i think that he has been released from pain, released from suffering, but a deep, deep thankfulness and sadness that he is gone because this is a nation that looks at itself as a nation no longer having that hajj, that visionary, that profits of mandela in their midst. >> robin, that grape, somber move will continue ten days of national mourning. so what can we expect of the next few days? >> well, it's going to be interesting how this plays out. just remember, the government, the authorities, the family here have kept details of his illness as you know over these months, very, very close to their chests. there have certainly been no official planning released. so what we know, what cnn has gathered you know has been a culmination of speaking to many people and sources and what we understand is that over the next ten days, nelson mandela's body will be accompanied most of the time by a group of tiebal elders who have come up here from his home village and they will be accompanying him ob this final journey. they are going to be at the morgue there to a military hospital in pretoria. we understand there is a traditional ceremony called the closing of the eyes in which the tribal leaders talk to the spirits of mandela and to his ancestors, paving the way essentially into the after world and they have been explaining to him every time he's moved to a different location. now, there will be various locations where the body will be moved over the next few days, he will be embombed, probably on monday or tuesday. we look at him. people will be able to pay their respects to him at a memorial service, a public mostly anc memorial service at the local soccer stadium here in johannesburg where the football world cup final was held. some heads of states, perhaps barak obama will attend that. then we will see three days of lying in state. 2340u what will be symbol ec about that is that he will lie in state at the steps of the union building in nearly the same place where he took his oath of office to become the first democratically elected president. once that process is over on day nine essentially of this program, he will be flown by military aircraft along with the elders vip political figures and his family, which is large, they'll be flown down to his hometown and then the military, the state will effectively hand over his body, his coffin, his casket to the family at the get as of the homeinstead, i think from what we understand there will be a shift from moving the south african flag to putting a blanket over his casket, which will symbolize him coming home to his ancestral land. then there will be atate funeral in the ground of his ancestral home in the hills where he walked and played as a young child. so there really is a sense of a full circle of life here going back to those rural roots. >> so many.iant moments to come. thank you so much, such good work. such a long day four. we appreciate it. thank you. >>> and president barak obama paid his respects tog during a televised event. he credits mr. mandela with his first political action company against apartheid. this is some of what mr. obama had to say. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to forward the dpl that he set to make decisions guided not by hate but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make to strive for a further worthy of his sacrifice. >> well, one of nelson mandela's biggest supporters was archbishop desmond tutu. he presided over a church service in capetown to remember his friend a short time ago. these pictures coming into us about 30 minutes ago and people listening to mr. tutu's every word about his friend. archbishop tutu also released a statement saying, we quote, over the past 24 hour years madiba taught us how to come together and to believe in ourselves and each other. he was a unifier from the moment he walked out of prison. we are relieved that his suffering is over, but our relief is drowned by our grief. may he rest in peace and rise in glory. >> the memorials, the ceremonies are just beginning. so, too, will be the celebrations when people remember what a great bhan hefrls, all hills achievements he has done, so much more than anybody else, really, when you think about his life and impact on the world. there is so much to play out in the coming days. >> so many people who were younger who maybe missed if nelson mandela moments will get to learn about this great man, a whole new generation will, perhaps. >> absolutely. we have much more ahead on the legacy of nelson mandela. >> our special cover annual continues right after a quick break. . >> they have been sitting outside nelson mandela homes in johannesburg. the crowds have gathered there. there is some singing. there is some dancing. it is still fairly subdued as this nation learns that the man that they love so much has now died. >> and we welcome you back to our continuing death of nelson mandela. >> the former south african president died peacefully at home on thursday after an extended illness, he was 95-years-old. >> well, the united nations's security council held a moment of silence on the announcement of mandela's death. >> leaders from around the world have been paying tribute to nelson mandela. this is what britain's prime minister david cameron had to say a little earlier. >> tonight, one of the brightest lights of our world has gone out. nelson mandela was not just a hero of our time, but a hero of all time. the first president of a free south africa, a man who suffered so much for freedom and justice. and a man who through his dignitary and through his triumph inspired millions. the strongest impression of all when you met him was of his extraordinary compassion and generosity and forgiveness. tonight, families across britain will mourn with his family and everyone in south africa. your greatest son has moved millions and i believe that his inspiration for the future will be every bit as powerful as the extraordinary things that he achieved in his remarkable life. thank you. >> general colin powell was the first african-american to serve as if joint chiefs of staff and secretary of state. powell about the impact nelson mandela had on his life. >> i was able to spend time with him and so many things said about nelson mandela, my memories will always go back to his inauguration. in 19 no94, i will never forget came up on stage to become the new president of the new south africa. he was preceded be i the four generals. you see things through the filter of your experience, as a general, i couldn't help to note these four generals came up on the stage ahead of him as a guard of honor. they were showing him they accepted him as a freely elected president. then he looked down to the jailers who were in the front row and reminded everybody that my regime, my new leadership of this country is about reconciliation. it's about democracy. it's about taking care of the people. it's about improving the economy and that living in the past but looking forward to the future, he was a remarkable man. >> general powell, who where do you think as somebody who met him and followed him so closely from your leadership of this country, where do you think he got the emotional strength to set this example? obviously, it would be i think psychologically impossible to completely forgive the people who oppressed you for having done that or having denied you spending time with your children, cost you a marriage imprisoned you for 27 years. but he did so, so nakedly, publicly, having his jailers there at his inauguration. how is he able to do that? >> i think he came from the depth of the soul, the depth of his heart and the depth of his love for his country and the depth of his love for his people and he made it clear from the very start that he was determined to bring an end to apartheid. he would do it peacefully. he would try to use the laws. if that didn't work, he was repaired to resort to violence and he did. but when the violence was getting out of control and it was obvious then that the white leadership was getting ready to reach out to him, he didn't compromise his principles. he insisted on tend of apartheid and a new way of life in south africa. so he believed and he sacrificed for his belief and he never strayed from his purpose. we all seen leaders like that, who have a clear vision, a clear purpose and who have moral courage and fiscal courage to do whatever is fwhes to succeed and that's what he did. that's what makes him an dpl to us. that's inspiration for the entire world. >> tell us if you would as somebody who had met him so many times, if have you any personal stories to share to lel let us in, so many of us know him only from television or his books or his speeches be you you actually had occasion to know him. >> i knew him. i had dinner with him. i had conversations with him. what always struck me was his humbleness. i mean, he was a humble, gentle, warm person, even though he was a fighter on the political stage as well as on the military stage, but he was a man of deep conviction about what was right and he approached every he met as a fellow named dooerngs equal to him. and that's what i remember. and he had a warm smile, we would sit. we would talk. he would say, how are you? i'm very well, thank you. and he was so gracious. a gracious man. you very seldom can find that combination of virtues and values and principles all in one person. it was all there in one man we all came to love and know mandiba, nelson mandela. >> how about that? >> a fighter but warm and gentle former secretary of state collin powell there. >> stay with us. we will continue to look at the life and legacy of nelson mandela. >> including his love of sports and how he used it to help unite south africa. that's still ahead. . >> welcome back. nelson mandela made an appearance at soccer stadium in johannesburg him he missed the opening ceremony you might recall a great granddaughter had been killed in a car crash just hours before. but the nearly 85,000 spectators final between spain and the netherlands were all delighted to see the former south african president. it was to be his last major public appearance. we haven't talked enough about the nelson mandela smile. my goodness. >> and the laugh. >> yeah. >> and the dancing. >> yes. >> that, too. yes. we'll see that as well. >> that's what i will always remember. >> nelson mandela once famously said sport has the power to change the world. he was a keen boxer and runner in his younger days. as president he used the 199 a 5 rugby world cup to bring all the issues of south africa. nelson mandela leaves a lasting impression on the world of sport. >> this is your country. 7 minutes. 7 minutes. defense, defense, defense. this is it. this is our destiny. >> ought only did the 1959 rugby world cup produce the nations host title. it was once used as a springbird by then president nelson mandela to try to develop a united post south africa. mandela appreciated the impact sports was capable of and a premier home event held in his homeland was just the vehicle he needed. in 2009, a hollywood production of "invictus" was presented by clint eastwood to inspire change by rugby. >> this is a story about a man who went his own way even though a lot of people advised him against it and were objected to his getting involved with using a sport to kind of bring about reunification and it worked. it workled. it's a wonderful moment in south african history. >> reporter: the movie stars matt damon who plays francois piinaar. freeman believes since that 1995 tournament the nation has gone from strength to strength. >> i think what they learned on that day was that together they could do anything. if they pull together there was nothing they couldn't do. the entire country so happy having pulled that off because mandela resorted everyone to pull for the team to be one country, one nation, one team, one nation, one team, one nation. so i think that's what they walked away from that whole experience with, we did it. >> reporter: south african golf ledgered gary player is regarded as the finest in history. he has nothing but respect for the mandela legacy. >> rugby was strictly a white man's sport. in the world cup when nelson mandela came into that statement wearing a springbok jersey, he united everything everyone. i'm honored to say our springbok team, it wouldn't surprise me to see ten or 12 on the team. in the schools it's now being played. how do you work out what a man like president mandela has been done? he has been so powerful with love. love conquers the world. >> reporter: the 1995 rugby world cup is remembered so much more than a tournament. it was a defining moment, inspired by mandela who in his own special and unique way insured victory for his country on and off the field of play. >> yeah. >> that rugby world cup was so amazing and then to see it in the movie with matt damon and morgan freeman. >> nailed it. >> absolutely. a goose bump moment. >> through the sport, you get to see for so many words describing nelson mandela, he's a joyful person. you could see is that when he was engaged in sports. >> and with children, too. >> absolutely. >> you say, what did you have for breakfast today? little things like that. >> i think bill clinton once told a story how he would ask about chelsea when he seen bill and hillary. he had advice or thoughtful things about child rearing and family as well. too much to say. we won't get it all in in ten days of coverage. we will look at the impact of nelson mandela. >> we will have another report. robyn curnow from johannesburg and reaction from around the world. please stay with us. you are watching cnn. . >> welcome back to a special cnn news room. there are few people who changed the world. >> ah, yes, but nelson mandela did. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. the president and iconic champion of civil rights died thursday age 95 after years of illness. he was at his home in johannesburg surrounded by family. south african president jacob zuma said our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. mandela's hospital has been moved. this is the scene right outside mandela's home there in johannesburg in the out market neighborhood. you can see right now people are laying flowers and to bring tribute to the man widely seen as the father of modern south africa. he was president for five years. he stepped down, has not been president for 14 years but remains very much in the heart of so many people there. this news came later than night south african time and so right now as this country wakes up, 34 minutes past 8:00, many people are learning nelson mandela is at rest. >> and, of course, mandela accomplished so many great things. he was the father of a nation. he led south africa through its battle against oppression and on to democracy and it kept him away from home. he also stayed very close to his family as we've mentioned our robyn curnow has covered nelson mandela since 1996 and she joins us now, once again, live from johanns burg did talk to him ability his family. he had a lot of family to keep up with as well? >> reporter: absolutely. and i think nelson mandela would acknowledge it and his family will acknowledge it that he had a complicated family life, three marriages, lots of children and grandchildren and also said sometimes they don't get on so well. i mean, this has been perhaps, if you were to call his life some of it failures or mistakes, i think he would have acknowledged that the impact of his choices, of his political decisions had very, very far reaching deep rooted impacts on his family on his private life. and i think those are still felt very much today, you know, when jacob zuma said late last night in south africa that south africa had lost a father. this nation claimed nelson mandela as their father. but i think it's at times like this you have to stop and remember that family who essentially lost him over and over and over again and they've lost a father today and i think that it will take a while for them to be able to process to be able to look at this time and say, you know, he was ours but mostly, he was everybody else else's. ♪ happy birthday to you. >> nelson mandela had a large family who gathered each year to sing at happy birthday. in return he sometimes offered advice. some of it useful, some of it not. speaking to cnn in mandela's house during his 94th birthday celebrations. >> it had been raining, he was looking outside, i'm on my phone, he says, you know mbuso when i was young, i used to run outside naked in the rain. i think you should do that now. i started laughing. i started laughing. >> what a piece of advice. >> mandela was not only irref rant, rule mus. >> i am a yankee. >> reporter: and a life long rebel. he also taught his children about humility, in an interview in 2010. >> i remember one of my first trips was into the states when he was president. he was mobbed, as usual, by the people. one of the woman came up, shelves quite emotional and he was very quiet in the car and he said overnight, he was so very quiet, very enextive. he said, dashlgs did you see how emotional that woman was? he says, i wonder why. >> reporter: winnie mandela was a small child when her dad was sent to prison on robben island. she only saw him again when she was a teenager t. original drafts he wrote his children in prison are archived in the mandela foundation. >> this is written to my darlings, his two young daughters. >> yes. >> and i loved the line here where he complements her for cooking rice and many other things and the most poignant thing in 1969, i'm looking forward to the day when i'll be able to enjoy all that she cooks. >> yes, a long way to go still. yeah. >> reporter: he wrote those letters in this cell with the strain of worrying about his family growing up without him is evident in his prison diaries transdescribed in 2008, mandela recorded his dreams, a psych logical record of the dread, the anxiety he fell. >> imagine falling into a ditch, dreamt returning home late at night almost at dawn. embraced sickly zami as he enters the back door of our orlando home. she is about 2 years and swallowed a aizor blade which she vomits out. nearly three decades locked away from loved ones, taught him to bury those fears, said his granddaughter in 2012. >> he keeps his emotions very well guarded. understandably so. because for more than two decades, it's something that he could master and, yeah, and he keeps those close to his chest. >> reporter: inside his home during his 94th birthday celebrations, his other granddaughters rearranged family photographs, reminders that when he eventually did come home, 27 years later, nelson mandela found his family still there waiting for him i think what's going to be difficult for his family over the next ten days is to find that private time, that time for themself to say good bye. this is such a public passing with such a public man with such a community farewell planned over the next ten days. for them the struggle is going to be finding that spa is space say good-bye and to be able to to just think this through. i think for them they sometimes get angry at all the media intrusion and they say, he's ours, he's ours. you know, you media, you public, you shouldn't interfere in this particularly over these last three months when he was so sick. there was a dope sense of resentment people were prying into his private life and their grief as they watched him slowly deteriorate. so i think, you know, there will be and i think a call for sank sank vr sank south average africans to give them some space. >> people will recall the struggle in the hospital they publicly expressed over that that you talk about. we certainly hope many of them were with him when he passed on. robyn curnow in johannesburg, we thank you. well, the man likely to be remembered as a great statesmen of all time had humble beginn g beginnings. ivan watson looks back at where it all began for nelson mandela. [ music playing ] >> reporter: these beautiful hills hide poverty and oppression. it was here that until nel was born into the clan in 1918. soon after his father was stripped of his chieftan championship and they moved to another veg. mandela like the overwhelming majority of black south africans spent a childhood desperately poor and with little or no opportunity for advance. . it was the experience of dispossession and poverty her that fuelled nelson mandela's life long desire to oppose white supremacy and bring freedom to his people. he went to school in a hunt with the remains are still visible. his real like was trouble maker in his home language. but in the classroom the teacher gave him a white man's name nelson. he would also be known by the traditional clan man mandiba. he was one of the lucky few to get a formal education. it was also among these hills the young man experienced african democracy first hand. he listened to council chiefs and elders debating issues for hours until they reached consensus on an issue. the traditional leader says this vital lesson influenced mandela years later as president when he helped shape south africa's modern democracy and reconciled blacks and whites. >> he has struggled both with the african and the balancing act that has been worked upon through mandela's leadership to insure that it ends in a peaceful and free country. >> reporter: in his 20s, mandela left rural life for johannesburg where he studied law and soon rose to political prominence but he was always proud of his heritage and he appeared in court wearing traditional robes at the trial in 1964. it was a healing moment when his father's chieftanship was returned to the family in 2007 and handed to mandela's grandson mandola. he says family and planned history is pivotal to his grntd father's identity. >> we would like to tell the story of the mandela royal family within the greater nation and how it has existed over the many centuries and how it has played its role from one generation to another. it is those tradition and customs that seem to be the person that he became. >> reporter: when he retired from public life, mandela returned to live a quiet life in kunu. he celebrated his 91st birthday here, illness returned him to johannesburg to be better closer to better medical care. despite the end of his long and historic life, the enduring legacy of his african culture and customs lives on. ivan watson, cnn. >> mr. mandela went on to become an international icon and a moral role model for government figures around the world. as australia's foreign minister was one of the first international officials to meet with the south african leader after his release from prison. he joins us online. thank you for speaking with us. you were there after those days he walked free. we all know essentially nelson mandela could have started a civil war, if you like, with the raise of a first, but yet he didn't, so what's your recollection of those days once he was set free? >> well, it was immediately obvious to those who met him that the central driving force behind him was this absence of bitterness towards the south africana jailers with the previously 27 years and that was something that struck me immediately as the key to managing a successful transition if he could communicate that to the white minority and get them out of the mindset that he was a communist terrorist to be feared or despised. those first set of impressions he created, first international people he met the first time he was seen widely domestically is crucial. the first impressions were extraordinarily accurate. what is interesting about mandela, there is something about the man, his decency, his compassion, his capacity for forgiveness which just was luminous and i was just struck by it. i was entrenched by it. i never met anyone more aggressive in my entire life. >> did you expect him to be so gracious and so forgiving when he walked from robben island. >> i don't think he had the speed. my concern was that, you know, all the expectations i had had couldn't possibly be realized in practice and i as a student protester of my generation how could this man be as iconic as we hoped he would be. but he was. that was the point. then we obtained from his background and the tribal village and listening to elders in that process of reconciliation. i don't know where it came from it was absolutely crucial and it was down into indicated effectively. the most transient spoorns i had was at the rugby stadium in south africa about three mobth later. it was in full flight. i was sitting with mandela, the scene of the latest sentiment enfuelment. the crowd, 55,000 watched, hardly a black face inside. rugby was a white man's sport, chanting mendel la, mandela. i just was aspiring. he made one realize the extent to which he had captured the hearts and the mind, he had overcome that fear, that hatred, anxiety. >> you spent a lot of time in the rough and tumble of australian politics, actually years ago now. if you look at politics today, it's pretty much a zero sum game not only in australia but many parts of the world him on this day now that nelson mandela has died, the man that set so many example for so many of us. what do you think politicians can learn from his legacy? >> you know, making real progress in serving the real problems of humanity and our countries isn't achieved by running politics. it's achieved through intelligence. it is achieved through grace. it is achieved through humanity. the media of the kind you guys are contributing to, it's very, very hard to do, to get people to stand back and think what are the bake issues? in all societies, there is a better standard of politics. if mandela's life and death can remind us of what those angels are and how important they are for avoiding the bloodshed that would have been inevitable in south africa then his life has been plagued with living indeed. >> someone called him once the president of the republic of morality. garrett evans, join us on the line from combus campus. thank you so much for sharing your memories and insights. >> very nice comments from him. as we hear from all of these people and their reflections. we see the pictures of nelson mandela. i cannot decide which was the best when he walked out of prison or raised his hand? >> the dancing is still. world cup dancing. >> when we return, we will hear from south africa's last apartheid president. >> f.w. de klerk and the nobel peace prides with nelson mandela. we talk to de klerk when we return. . hmm. mm-hmm. [ engine revs ] sisulu. s. >> it is coming up to 9:00 in the morning in south africa. welcome to our special edition of cnn newsroom, the world is mourning the death of nelson mandela. >> the former south african president and nobel prize laureat fell ill. he was 95, he proved he was strong in his youth, strong in middle age and a fighter to the end. >> he was ill for almost a year. the man who nelson mandela shares that '90-'93 nobel prize, he was the president of south africa in 1890. >> that is when he made the fateful decision to free the most political prisoner. de klerk spoke on phone. >> christian, it's a sad day, a sad moment. it is good to hear your voice again. >> thank you, sir. please tell me and tell the world what you feel at this moment beyond the sadness and what you can say about the man who became your partner and you became his under extremely difficult circumstances to transform your country? >> first, i would like to say that i fully associate myself with the dignified and feeling statement which the president has made. every word of what he said is true and he touched my heart. his biggest nelson mandela biggest legacy was his commitment to reconciliation was his remarkable lack of bitterness and the way in which he did not only talk about reconciliation, but he made reconciliation happen in south africa. he was a remarkable man and south africa not withstanding political differences stand united today in mourning this great special man. >> mr. de klerk, what did, walk me back to when you summoned him from the word prison when you first met him, why did you do that? what was going on then? and what did you think of him when he came into your presence the first time? >> it was that first meeting that we had was intended and i think the same intention just to get the feel of each other because it was already clear then there would be negotiation. it was already clear it would be remiss. no dates were fixed. no specific announcements were made. but he has been talking even in the time of my predecessor through four important role players within the government and the national party. having talks about talks, discussing the possibility of negotiation. we are talking about the real issues, which would be negotiated about later on but exploring the probability of negotiation and both of us after that first meeting wrote in our perspective auto biographies that we would report back to our constituencies, i think i can do business with this man. there was an immediate i would say a spark between the two of us and not withstanding the many stats we have later, i always respected him and i always liked him as a person. he was a magnanimous person. he was a compassionate pen. he was not only a man of vision, not only a night leader. but he was also a very human, human man. >> in the end you both won a nobel peace prides for that work for bringing democracy to south africa. there you were the white president of a minority regime and this towering moral figure came into your presence. what did you feel when you first saw him? what did he look like? >> ah, he, i was, i studied a lot about him. i was briefed by those who were speaking to him while he was still in brinprison, but he impressed me, he was taller than i expected. he was ramrod straight. he looked one in the eye very directly. he was a good listener. i could to immediately see that he had an analytical approach to discussions, which i liked very much. i was very much impressed with him at that first meeting. >> p.w. de klerk. with more on the life of the nelson mandela, go to cnn.com/mandela. you can find photo galleries, a quote gallery and much more. >> much more incredible live and the special coverage of the death of nelson mandela continues right here on cnn. >> we will have much more on his life and legacy ahead. stay with us. . 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Dec 6, 2013 4:00am EST
>>> this morning, the world wakes to the news that a joint of human and civil rights is gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force, reve revered, forever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people. and to millions around the world. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world wakes to news of a giant of human and civil rights gone. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for forever changing history. >> she spent nearly three decades in prison, becoming the first black president in south africa. father figure to millions around the globe. >> people around the world are remembering nelson mandela, a symbol of forbearance, peace and dignity. we have pictures from south africa, where people have been celebrating the former leader's life, by chancing through the streets overnight. >> alex marquardt is there, where they're trying to come to grips with the death of an icon. >> reporter: there's a profound sense of loss and mourning that's swept the entire country. celebrations like this one, right outside mandela's home, we've seen spring up around the country. south africans marking the passing of this great man by celebrating his life. it was just before midnight that south african president jacob zuma announced to the nation and to the world, that nelson mandela had died. >> this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost its greatest son. >> reporter: tributes quickly poured in from around the world, including from president barack obama. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> reporter: that love, shown in the massive crowds that quickly gathered outside mandela's home and around the country. singing and dancing, joyfully celebrating the life of a man who gave so many hope and freedom. >> i think we should celebrate what he has achieved and what he's given us. i wouldn't be here. i wouldn't be free, as i say, if it wasn't for him. >> reporter: south africa's first black president was surrounded by much of his family when he passed away. now, ten days of national mourning will start, during which mandela will lie in state in the capital, pretoria, so south africans can say their final good-byes, before he's taken back to his ancestral village for burial. >>> here at home, the u.s. paying its highest respects. >> president obama has given the order to fly u.s. flags at half-staff, saying n ining mand longer belongs to us. >>> and people are reacting to the news of mandela's death. >> tahman bradley has the latest from washington. >> reporter: americans are paying their respects from indiana to harlem, new york, to brooklyn. >> he was still very strong. >> reporter: in washington, people gathered at mandela's statue outside the south african embassy. >> for me, it's a sense of my boys can have the opportunity to do a lot more things. >> reporter: president obama, attending a hanukkah reception last night at the white house, remembered mandela as a champion of human rights. >> a moral giant who embodied the dignity and the courage and hope. and sought to bring about justice, not only in south africa, but i think inspire millions around the world. >> reporter: those millions, moved by mandela's long walk to freedom. imprisoned for 27 years. he became a global symbol of the fight against apartheid. from his tiny cell, mandela rallied millions against racism and injustice. in 1990, the south african government, under heavy pressure at home and around the world, released mandela, and began dismantling apartheid. >> never again shall we be. the spirit, the oppression. >> reporter: south africa will hold a memorial service in a 90,000-seat stadium. president obama plans to attend. >> president obama said he was inspired by nelson mandela. what impact did he have on the president's life? >> reporter: huge impact. he met nelson mandela only once in 2005, when the president was a u.s. senator. but he studied nelson mandela's writings and works. he said the first political action was to attend an anti-apartheid rally. the president toured mandela's cell on robin island after he took office. and mrs. obama, michelle obama, along with her daughters, sasha and malia, they visited mandela, reading a book with him. and also talking with him. obviously, mandela, south africa's first black president, a huge inspiration to the u.s.'s first black president and his family. >> tahman bradley, live in washington for us this morning. >>> you heard tahman reference that memorial service that will be held in a football stadium. it's part of a logistical nightmare south african officials are facing. >> it's likely that most of the living u.s. presidents will travel to south africa. dozens of other dignitaries will attend. the event is being likened to organizing a world cup, plus a coronation and inauguration at the same time. >> bill clinton was in power when nellman mandela took power. we will remember him as a man of uncommon grace and compassion. >> reporter: mandela's two youngest daughters were in london at the time of his death, attending a premiere about the film of his life. >> they left immediately. but they asked the film be played to the end. the audience was told that mandela had died when the credits rolled. prince william was one of those watching the film. >> sad and tragic news. we're reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. >> british actor, idris allbaugh said, we have lost one of the greatest beings to have ever walk this earth. >>> another big story we're watching closely. a severe blast of cold air. dangerous temperatures are gripping much of the country. we'll show you where it's heading next. along with the ice and snow. >>> and mourning madiba. much more, including the jail guard, with a remarkable story about helping the imprisoned leader. >>> welcome back. a deep freeze is threatening the safety of nearly 200 million people across much of america this morning. >> the area especially hard-hit stretches from texas to the great lakes. the brutal conditions, bone-chilling temperatures and heavy accumulations of ice and snow. oklahoma under a state of emergency. one of many southern-central states crippled by treacherous conditions. that area can expect up to six inches of snow, with temperatures colder than alaska. industrial-sized power generators are in place. the best advice, stay indoors. stay off the roads. >>> and parts of texas through arkansas and tennessee, will be under ice storm warnings throughout the day. stores across the region are running out of supplies. and the expected half-inch or more of ice will bring dangerous driving conditions and widespread power outages. accuweather meteorologist jim dickey is tracking all of it for us. >> staying frigid across the northern plains, the midwest into the rockies. many spots well down below zero. minus 4 in minneapolis. minus 12 in denver. minus 15 into pierre. as that cold filters off to the south and's, an area of ice and snow continues. an ice storm continues across arkansas into west kentucky, west tennessee, moving into the ohio valley and northeast. john and diana, back to you. >> jim, thank you. >>> if you're flying, a list of possible airport delays is long. dallas, memphis, atlanta, charlotte, d.c., philadelphia, new york, boston, houston and new orleans. >>> in other news, florida state quarterback jameis winston will not face sexual assault charges. there's too many gaps in the accuser's story. winston's a leading heisman trophy candidate. he will lead the seminoles in tomorrow's acc title game. >>> here's a landing attempt you have to see to believe. this is an emirates airlines jet trying to land in fierce wind. the captain tried to land twice. he had to fly to london and land there. the wild ride had one passenger tweeting out, quote, never flying again. >> you look at that video. and that captain made the right choice. that nose is going another direction from the runway. >> coming in sideways. >>> when we come back, remembering nelson mandela. reactions pouring in from celebrities about his passing. our special coverage, nellmson mandela, a man who changed the world, continues. at university of phoenix we know the value of your education is where it can take you. 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[ laughter ] >> nelson mandela showing his humorous side almost ten years ago when he bowed out of public life. >> the public never got enough of him. and this morning, crowds gathering outside of mandela's home in johannesburg. the former south african president died at 95 years old. he is being remembered for his fight against apartheid. a sacrifice that influenced millions, including president obama. >> today, he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will ever share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> it will be nearly two weeks of mourning in south africa. and nelson mandela will lie in state in pretoria until he is buried in his ancestral village. >>> robin roberts got to meet him three years ago. >> she described her experience to diane sawyer on "world news." >> when i broke to graca machel, i asked what is her husband's legacy going to be? and she said, a visionary leader. and it is the quality, the quality of leadership. >> robin went on to say that mandela wanted to right the wrongs and give each one of us the feeling that we could do the same thing, too. >> mandela showed the world the meaning of true forgiveness. by the time he walked out of prison, he had formed an unlikely bond with one of his jailers. abc's david muir explains. >> reporter: cristo brand peers out over the water, to the former prison on robin island, where he first reported for duty at 18. >> they informed us we're going to meet the biggest criminals in the history of south africa. >> reporter: nelson mandela was nearly 60. forced to sleep on the floor. the young jailer's family was afrikaner, the party that supported apartheid. but when the young jailer met mandela, he met an elder who would treat the young white man with respect. and the jailer would slowly offer the same in return. cristo brand told us of one of winnie mandela's visits. >> just leave the child. >> reporter: no children allowed. not even his precious new grand baby. while she waited in a holding area, that jailer had secretly brought the baby to mandela. >> there were just tears coming out of his eyes. >> reporter: and no one ever knew? >> no one knew. >> reporter: all of the isolating years on robin island, the prison guard said there was one view of the country nelson mandela loved. that was the top of table mountain here in capetown behind me. that mandela would look to this view, wondering if he'd ever be free. but mandela was always preparing for that day. he asked the jailer to teach him africans, the language of the whites in power. there were essays and the red pen that corrected them. on the day mandela was released, his speech was delivered in africans. mandela famously said, if you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. if you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. >> that's what he did. that's what he strived for. that's what he loved for. that's what he fighted for while he was in prison, to have people live in peace. >> reporter: the jailer, who became a trusted friend, now remembering nelson mandela. >> incredible story there. he touched so many lives. talk show titan oprah winfrey weighing in on mandela's passing. >> winfrey, who credits mandela as the inspiration for her school in south africa, said being in his fence was like sitting with grace and majesty at the same time. and she added, one of the great honors of my life was to be invited to nelson mandela's home, spend private time and get to know him. he was everything you heard and more. humble and unscathed by bitterness. >> that is completely understandable. mandela once said sports has the power to change the world. >> the 1995 rugby world cup in south africa, mandela donned the home team's jersey, which for generations had been linked to white south africa. it was a moment of national reconciliation. >> tiger woods, among the major sports stars weighing in on his death. woods and his father met mandela in 1998. >> he had an impact on my life and my father. and that time frame in which -- when he came out, could have -- the country could have fallen apart. it could have gone a lot of different ways. and he led it to where it's at now. and the world's going to miss him. >> mandela kept a low profile while south africa hosted soccer's 2010 world cup. his memorable appearance came before the final in johannesburg, when he was driven around the field among a thunderous ovation. it would be mandela's last public appearance. >> that smile is so charming. >>> up next, the first lady on her one and only meeting with mandela. >> and how this event is playing out in social media, unlike any other before it. ♪ [ male announcer ] even well-planned holidays can wind up at the corner of "stockings are stuffed" and "quick -- duck!" luckily, walgreens is always nearby, so it's easy to get in and out for extra stocking stuffers... or anything else you might suddenly need. stop by walgreens anytime for hershey's kisses chocolates, gift cards, and more. plus get up to 20 dollars in jingle cash on next week's purchase of 30 dollars or more. here at the corner of happy and healthy. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. 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[announcer] start using intuit quickbooks for free at quickbooks-dot-com. ♪ >>> i told him, you cannot imagine how important your legacy is to who i am, to who my husband is. and i just said, thank you. thank you. thank you. >> first lady michelle obama expressing the thoughts of so many when it comes to nelson mandela. >> many well-known others, of course, taking to social media to have their say about him. abc's jim avila reports. >> reporter: nelson mandela made history in grainy black and white. but his death was fully covered by modern social media, approaching 4 million tweets in the first two hours after his death was announced. former president bill clinton posting this picture. a hand shake and the words, i will never forget my friend, madi madiba. and on facebook, president george w. bush, president mandela was one of the forces for freedom and equality of our time. he bore his burdens with dignity and grace. and our world is better off because of his example. it's the type of worldwide experience that draws young and old, black and white, to share feelings. charlize theron. my thoughts and love go out to the mandela family. rest in peace, madiba. you will be missed. but your impact on this world will last forever. spike lee posted this picture with a simple message. and then, there's this one from nasa. intergalactic reaction from the space shuttle, posting a picture of mandela's beloved south africa. and the crowds continue to gather in front of mandela's home, perhaps the day's most poignant message from his own twitter account. death is something inevitable. when a man has done what he considers to be his duty to his people and his country, he can rest in peace. a virtual memorial on social media. electronic good-byes for the man who brought the world together. jim avila, abc news, new york. >>> well, those electronics good-byes are exploding across social media. newspapers, eulogizing the civil rights icon. >> some of this morning's notable headlines. britain's "daily mail." death of a colossus. "new york times" calling him fighter, prisoner, president and symbol. south africa's "cape times" 1918-2013. and "the daily news," farewell, dear friend. ♪ or getting a better seat? ♪ or let's say there's an accident. if you have esurance, you can use their mobile app to start a claim... upload a few photos... and get your money fast. maybe that doesn't make you a control freak. more like a control enthusiast. esurance. insurance for the modern world. now backed by allstate. click or call. esurance. insurance for the modern world. what does that first spoonful taste likok. honey bunches of oats. ching! mmmm! mmmm! mmmm! wow! it's the oats. honey. yeah. honey bunches of oats. this is a great cereal. for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] aveeno® with soy helps reduce the look of brown spots in 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. aveeno®. naturally beautiful results. ta-da! aveeno®. whoa. showtime. agh! there's me! there's me! there's me! boom. ohhhh! ♪ >>> checking our top stories, now reactions to the death of nelson mandela are pouring in from around the globe. the former south african president died yesterday. he was 95 years old. >>> president obama planning to lead the dell gration to south africa for a state funeral. >>> and today, we get an important reading on the health of the u.s. economy, as the government releases the monthly jobs report. one survey found private companies added 215,000 jobs last month, beating expectations. >> looking at today's weather. rainy in the northeast. icy from the great lakes into texas. below zero in the northern plains. it will be even normally toasty. l.a. will stay in the 50s. >>> finally this morning, a parting tribute to nelson mandela. >> the leader, the pioneer and one of the world's most influential icons remembered this morning across the globe from people of all walks of life. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands. >> it was tremendous. it was just tremendous. there was a lot of excitement. the electricity in the air. and he was truly one of the great, great heroes of our time. >> i just want to say, it's extremely sad and tragic news. we're reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. >> he showed us, with the clerk and the african in a how to build a nation. still has so much to go. but much further ahead than it was after apartheid. >> after all of the years he spent in prison, you could see it didn't break him. >> he comes back and is president. >> he inspired me to be a better person. i'm sure he's in a better place. >> there's never been a greater man with a greater mind or heart in history. >> he took a lot of lessons that martin luther king had and mahatma gandhi. and he used them to free the south african people. >> i believe that his inspiration for the future will be every bit as powerful as the extraordinary things that he achieved in his remarkable life. ♪ >> this is the moment for people's sorrow. our nation has lost its greatest son. >> nelson mandela, finally at peace. >>> that's what's making news in america this morning. p. >> stay with us for "good morning america." have a great day. ♪ >> living up to a legacy. the world celebrating and remembering thely of nelson mandela this morning. we will take a look ahead at how they're carrying on his torch. >> >> investigators are on the scene of an alexandria hotel that had to be evacuated overnight. good morning, washington, i'm jummy olabanji. >> i'm autria godfrey. happy to have you along with us this friday morning. stepping outside this morning honestly felt like a rainy summer day. >> exactly. it was amazing, jacqui. >> unbelievable.
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
>>> welcome to a special edition of "early today wroish "the world reacting to the loss of a global icon as news spread of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this friday morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars. yet, his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> in other news this day, much of the u.s. bracing for a major winter storm with snow, ice, and plunging temperatures. "early today" starts right now. 45 4556>>> good morning to you. i'm richard lui. he is known for changing the world. people around the globe mourning the loss of nelson mandela. from a small prison cell he empowered a nation. his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom gave him the respect of the world. >> his journey to president embody the promise that human beings ask countries can change for the better. >> we should have the same type of spirit and caring of the people and as a nation. >> we go to roba from johannesburg. this is not unexpected given mr. mandela's house. we might ask now how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: richard, news of nelson mandela's death was announced just before midnight. so inevitably still today many of south africans are still learning the news that the father of this nation passed away during the evening. here his suburban home in johannesburg many hundreds of people have come. the mood here is not somber at all, though. there have been very few people here in tears. people have come to celebrate his life and the lives that they've been able to achieve and to live as a result of his sacrifice. people here also wondering precisely what happens next, and we're awaiting details in the next few hours about a lying in state and about nelson mandela's burial, which once diplomats are saying that the plan resembled the biggest state funeral for any former leader south of winston churchill. >> thank you. rohi for us in south africa. now to nbc's brian williams with a look at mandela's incredible life and unwavering spirit. >> to deny any person human rights is the challenge of very humanity. >> reporter: nelson mandela called his life a long walk to freedom, a struggle to end south africa's racist system of aparthe apartheid. as a young lawyer and activist he initially advocated peaceful resistance. >> police fired point-blank into the crowd. >> reporter: south african police killed scores of anti-apartheid demonstrators. for nelson mandela, it was a turning point. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose rely is the savage attack on unarmed, defenseless people. >> reporter: the anc was banned. he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962 mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for decades the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast, facing sanctions, boycotts, and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. ♪ >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. hey, mandela >> the release of nelson mandela. >> reporter: in 1989 south africa's hardline president p.w.bota resigned, replaced by f.w. clark who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban on the anc was lifted, and on february 11th, 1990 nelson mandela walked to freedom. >> nelson mandela, free at last and back among his people. >> i thank you all in the name of peace. >> reporter: 27 years in prison had not weakened mandela's resolve. >> as long as the government has not -- >> reporter: but he also urged restraint, even forgiveness telling blacks to "throw their guns into the sea" and reassuring anxious whites. >> we want them to feel safe. >> reporter: mandela's courage and sacrifice were recognized around the world. in america he was welcomed as a hero. mandela and declerk were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history, nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is the day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president-elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it will take one year, two years, even as much as five years. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell. this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with a congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see america swear in its own first black president, and he was paid a visit many south africa by first lady michelle obama who brought along her daughters. nelson mandela's south africa embraced a multi-racial future and re-entered the family of nations. he leaves a legacy of freedom and proof that one life can make a difference. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> reporter: brian williams, nbc news, new york. >> we will have more on mandela's death in just a moment, but, first, some other stories developing this friday. you are watching many americans experiencing a massive weren't storm blasting its way across much of the country. take a look at oklahoma. a number of accidents there have been reported due to the recent snow accumulation. temperatures in missouri dipping so low that roads became sheets of ice, leaving drivers just like that, sliding all over the streets. nbc's meteorologist bill karens has more on that for us. we've got that, and we also have what's happening in the west. >> there's a new storm coming. we have bitterly cold temperatures, northern rockies. winter just, boom, just all of a sudden slapping everyone in the face. look at this map. pink shows the winter storm warnings. we have some in northern california and oregon. we have winter storm warnings from dallas, texas, into areas of ohio. ice storm warnings in arkansas and tennessee. dangerous wind chills in it is northern plains. i saw one in the negative 20 to negative 30 range. we've heard about 1,200 flights cancel from the dallas area to little rock to memphis. that's where the worst of the ice is. especially northern arkansas and tennessee. northern arkansas, those people could be without power for a week. imagine that. as far as the west goes, you can barely see it riding down the coast lien. right now it's right off the washington coast, and it's got plenty of cold air to work with. 48 hour snowfall forecast. not so much around portland, but once you get south around eugene, higher totals around the hills and mountains there. around bedford, snow in some of the lower elevations, and look at the forecast for tahoe going up i-80. going to be very difficult this evening into tomorrow morning. as much as 12 to 18 inches of snow. that's not going to be in the sacramento area, but just north of there, those places will g changing over to snow red bluff, california xshgs sacramento, cold rain for you. >> it is cold. it's been cold. yesterday was very cold even around san francisco, napa, and this morning is no different. >> if are you trying to get away for the weekend, bring the sleeping bags. you could get stuck on the road. >> thank you, bill karens. much more on the words and life of nelson mandela. he fought tirelessly for the rights and liberty of all south africans. famously saying "our march to freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way." >>> now for others stories making news this morning. vice president biden wrapping up his visit to china on thursday. he raised the issue of the treatment of u.s. journalists in the country. nearly two dozen journalists from different u.s. publications are in daenk of not having their visas renewed by year's end. biden argued newspaper should be able to report the truth without fear of consequences. during an msnbc exclusive interview chris matthews asked president obama who would be a better president, joe biden or hillary clinton? here's his answer. >> both hillary and joe would make outstanding presidents and possess the qualities that are needed to be outstanding presidents. >>> police have arrested an 18-year-old for allegedly stealing a part from the porsche involved in the crash that killed paul walker. the suspect even posted photos of the roof panel you see here on-line bragging about that grab. >>> the navy announced a successful larchlg of a drone from a submerged submarine on thursday. the unmanned aircraft was -- it flew for several hours while transmitting live video. with that, we'll be right back. >>> the death of nelson mandela is being felt all around the world. joining me now for more on his life and leg as where i is u.s. congresswoman barbara lee of california joining us on the phone right now. representative lee, good morning to you. >> good morning, richard. >> thanks for stopping by. when you pushed for congress yam sanctions against south africa in 1986, did you think it would result in the mandela metamorphasis that we saw, he becoming what he did? >> i think that first it took a while for congressman -- i worked for him for 11 years, and he was a great statesman who knew that introducing the sanctions bill over and over and over again, i think about 12 times, that sooner or later -- president reagan vetoed it, and the congress overroad it. sooner or later the united states would be on the right side of history in terms of sanctions. >> right side of history, and then after that the falling of apartheid. >> the falling of apartheid, and the election -- well, first of all, the release of president mandela after the negotiations and then him being elected president of south africa, and i think what president mandela showed us was that there's an awesome possibility of the human spirit. first of all, he was never broken. most people who have been through what he has gone through would be bitter. they would be angry. president mandela was a freedom fighter, and he was one who worked and fought all of his life based on the principal that he was going to end or lead the end of apartheid south africa along with the people. >> and a representative, an icon of human rights, and part of that women's rights. by some measurements in south africa, it is more advanced than the united states. what did he mean, president mandela -- what did he mean for women's rights? >> president mandela showed the rest of south africa and the rest of the world that women are truly equal. women are equal partners in everything in life, and also, he had a vision for the world where everyone would be free to be who they want to be and who they should be, and also, i have to remind us that president mandela was one of the very first to come out to address h.i.v. and aids. his son died of aids, and very few african leaders would take that on. very few leaders in our own country. president mandela took on the issue with bold vision. he was always fighting for justice for women and for the freedom of the south african people and really more global peace and security. >> okay. thank you so much, representative barbara lee for stopping by this morning from california. appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. >> we'll be right back. >>> cold morning in the west. look at the temperatures. this, obviously, is glaring. minus 20 in wyoming. 27 in sacramento. 28 in vegas this morning. this isn't even factoring any breeze in out there which makes the temperatures feel even lower with the wind chill, and with the storm coming down the coast, the recipe for a little mini-snowstorm. northern california later today and then the mountains of the central and northern sierra and eventually some of the mountains there and the hills in northern arizona and even southern portions of utah too. again, be careful traveling. a little rain too in big cities, but not a lot. >> that weather in los angeles, they're breaking out the parka and the big uggs right now i think. >> they wear the uggs when it's 80. >> this is true, but it's exceptionally cold is what you are making the point. did you watch that game, by the way? >> i did not. >> battle of two teams, lackluster records. in sports we're watching that for you. nfl last night. we've got some records that were set. jaguars win their first home game in more than a year and now hold the longest winning streak in the afc, while houston reaches a team record 11th loss in a row. another dubious record for that team. 177 yards in penalties in that one game. yeah, you can bet this one, the jaguars won it 27-20. >>> sports stars also reacting to the passing of nelson mandela. portugal's soccer star christiano ronaldo thanking mandela for his legacy and example. brazil's pelee tweeted a photo of him kissing mandela's head saying he was one of the most influential people in his life. of course, we'll probably hear from more sports stars from around the world as time goes on. >>> to entertainment now. a manned written lyric sheet for bruce springsteen's 1975 hit "born to run" selling at auction for $197,000 on thursday. sotheby's did not reveal the identity of that buyer. prince william and duchess kate were attending the royal premier of mandela long walk to freedom when they were informed of the death of nelson mandela. william offered his condolences. >> i just want to say of the extremely sad and tragic news, which reminds us what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson man demma was, and my thoughts and prayers with him and his family right now. >> of course, the special relationship that nelson mandela had with queen elizabeth calling each other by first names. very uncommon for the queen to have that. >> the outpouring is incredible. >> absolutely. >> i'm richard lui, and this is "early today." we hope it's just your first stop of the day right here on nbc. >>> leading the news around the world. nation mourns. south africa has lost its greatest son as madiva dies at 85. sfwlimplts south africa's apartheid as fighter, pioneer, president, and symbol. "no one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. people must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite." the washington post, a nation's healer is dead. the prisoner who became president. south african leader was symbol of moral force. in "time magazine" protester, peace maker, nelson mandela 1918 to 2013. >>> south africa's former president was a man of powerful actions and words. here is he in his own words before the u.s. congress in 1990. >> let us keep our arms linked together so that we form a solid against racism. >>> this morning, u.s. and world leaders are reacting to the news of his death. >> he was a moral force the likes of which have not been seen. >> nobody has ever matched the incredible inspiration and humanity of melson mandela. >>> former president bill clinton released a statement, in part, saying, "mandela proved that there is freedom in forgiving and a big heart is better than a closed mind, and that life's real victories must be shared." former secretary of state hillary clinton tweeted this, saying, "nelson mandela was a champion for justice and human dignity with unmatched grace. i'll remember him as madiba, truly an uncompromising soul. >>> house of speaker john boehner says "he passes this world as champion of peace." david cameron tweeted, "a great light has gone out in the world. nelson man dell extra was a hero of our time." on the "today" show later this morning former secretary of state colin powell talks about the life and legacy of nelson mandela. i'm richard lui. thanks for watching "early today." >>> remembering a hero, how people across the world are coming together today to honor the leg goosy of former south african president nelson mandela. >> a statewide amber alert in effect after this 14-year-old is abducted from washington state. where authorities think the suspect is taking her. >> and city streets turning to a rushing river. we're going to tell you how this mess causing concern for the morning commute. >> a live look outside this morning, it's another chilly day but it's friday, december 6th, and this is "today in the bay." >> good morning.
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 2:00am PST
viewed. >>> as the details of the arrangements for the next few days emerge, we will bring them to you right here. that does it for us. thank you for being with us. . >>> the world reacts to the loss of a global icon as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. >>> good morning. i'm ma ra schiavocampo. he's remembered as a man that changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tireless struggle for freedom earned him the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we should have the same type of spirit and caring as a people and as a nation. >> nbc's rohit kachroo begins our coverage live from johannesburg this morning. rohit, this was not entirely unexpected news, given mr. mandela's health. how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: mara this was predictable news but painful none theless, announced late at night just before midnight south african time. many millions of south africans are still waking up to learn the news the father of this nation passed away during yesterday evening. first the mood here at nelson mandela's suburban home was fairly somber. now it is incredibly cell la braer to. people are bringing flowers, cheering, singing songs from the anti-apartheid struggle. they're celebrating his life and celebrating the lives they can now lead as a result of his anti-apartheid struggle. many people wondering here precisely what will happen next? what will the state event be. they're waiting for details about a lying in state which is expected in the next few days and about a burial which one american diplomat described as being the biggest state burial in the world since that of winston churhill. >> celebration of a remarkable life, rohit kachroo, thank you for that. >>> in so many ways nelson mandela is known as man who taught a country and the world to believe in a better future. nbc's brian williams is here with an in-depth look at his incredible life and unwavering spirit. >> to deny any person the human rights, is to challenge their very humanity. >> reporter: nelson mandela called his life a long walk to freedom, a struggle to end south africa's racist system of apartheid. as a young lawyer and activist, he initially advocated peaceful resistance until the 1960 sharpeville massacre. >> the police fired point-blank into the crowd. >> reporter: south african police killed scores of anti-apartheid demonstrators. for nelson mandela, it was a turning point. >> there are many people who feel it is useless for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence against a government whose reply is only savage attacks on unarmed, defenseless people. >> reporter: mandela's african national conference was banned, he became an outlaw, but he refused to back down. arrested in 1962, mandela was charged with sabotage and with attempting to violently overthrow the government. he was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. for years, for decades, the struggle for justice in south africa continued with the imprisoned nelson mandela as its symbol. at times, he was forced to break rocks in the hot sun for hours at a time. the government offered mandela freedom if he would renounce violence. he refused. >> today marks the 25th year behind bars for nelson mandela. >> reporter: south africa became an international outcast facing sanctions, boycotts and growing political pressure. >> nelson mandela should be released to participate in the country's political process. >> reporter: rock concerts for the cause were broadcast around the world. hey mandela hey mandela the release of nelson mandela >> reporter: in 1989, south africa's hardlined president p.w. botha declined, replaced by f.w. de klerk, who slowly began to dismantle apartheid. the ban was lifted and on february 11th, 1990, nelson mandela walked to freedom. >> nelson mandela, free at last, and back among his people. >> i greet you all in the name of peace. >> reporter: 27 years in prison had not weakened mandela's resolve. >> the struggle will go on as long as the government has not responded to our satisfaction. >> reporter: but he also urged restraint, even forgiveness, telling blacks to, quote, throw their guns into the sea and reassuring anxious whites. >> whites are fellow south africans and we want them to feel safe. >> reporter: mandela's courage and sacrifice were recognized around the world. in america, he was welcomed as a hero. mandela and de klerk were awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993p. the following year in the first mixed race election in south africa's history nelson mandela was elected president. >> today is a day like no other before it. >> reporter: we were the first to interview him on that first morning as president elect. mandela tempered south africa's joy when he said healing his country would take time. >> it cannot be done overnight. it is going to take a year, two years, even as much as five years. so help me god. >> reporter: from enemy of the state to head of state, nelson mandela's walk to freedom became a journey shared by his entire nation. >> i have never been so excited and hopeful in my life in south africa as i am now. >> reporter: years later, nelson mandela paid a return visit to his former prison cell, this time accompanied by president bill clinton, who later presented him with the congressional gold medal. mandela stepped down as president in 1999, but he lived long enough to see the united states elect its own black president. >> so help me god. >> reporter: and in 2011 he was paid a visit in south africa by first lady michelle obama who brought along first daughters malia and sasha. admired around the world and revered at home, nelson mandela's south africa embraced a multiracial future and re-entered the family of nations. he leaves a legacy of freedom and proof that one life can make a difference. >> we are one country, we are one people. >> reporter: brian williams, nbc news, new york. >>> we'll have much more on mandela's death in just a moment, but first, a massive winter storm is blasting its way across much of the country. in oklahoma, a number of accidents have been reported due to the recent snow accumulation. temperatures in missouri hit so low that roads became sheets of ice leaving drivers sliding all over the place. now for a look at the national forecast, bill karins is here with more. good morning, bill. >> a lot of school delays today, cancellations, power outages, people may go for a week or so in arkansas and tennessee without power. one of those ice storms, the setup is perfect. the arctic air yesterday and now the rain over the top of it and the pink on the map shows you where we're dealing with freezing rain or sleet. around the dallas area wasn't a lot of freezing rain, mostly sleet. you have an inch or two of sleet out there. that's dangerous to drive in. the worst of the ice from the little rock area northward up to ft. smith, arkansas and north of memphis there and western it tennessee during the day you're going to get it today and the temperatures are below freezing. significant snow overnight southern missouri, southern illinois, portions of southern indiana and shifting into ohio. so the temperatures are the key. look at dallas here, plenty cold. look at oklahoma city 19 with snow. 34 still in little rock where your temperatures will fall during the morning commute. that's when the ice will begin to accumulaaccumulate, 6 to 8 ie narrow band through the southern ohio valley north of the ohio river and very careful this morning around new york city and through new england. there's some patchy areas of very dense fog out there. it's so unusually warm. like 60 degrees right now in new york city. >> it's balmy. >> very strange. >> almost like a summer-like morning. >> they had the ice cream truck out yesterday in front of the rockefeller center christmas tree which was very bizarre. thanks so much, bill. >>> coming up, we'll have much more on the words and life of nelson mandela as he fought tirelessly for the rights and liberty for all south africans famously saying, quote, our march to freedom is irreversible, we must not allow fear to stand in our way. . >>> it has been my great privilege to serve a people whose bondage to an inhuman system evoked the solidarity of all those who love freedom and justice. >> leading the headlines around the world in the pretoria news "nation mourns." south africa has lost its greatest son as madiba dies at age 95. "the new york times," south africa's conquerer of apartheid, fighter, prisoner and president and symbol. times of london, passage from his book, quote, no one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or background or religion. people must learn to hate and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite. "the washington post," a nation's healer is dead. the prisoner who became president, south african leader, was symbol of moral force. and in "time" protester, prisoner, peacemaker, nelson mandela, 1918-2013. joining me now for more on all of this is washington's -- joining me from washington is leela mcdowell, washington correspondent for arise tv, with nelson mandela when he was released from prison and i'm joined by ron allen who is leaving for south africa later this morning. thank you both for being here this morning. leela, i would like to start with you. you were a witness to history and had the privilege of meeting this iconic figure. what was that time like whe when mandela was released from prison and what was he like at that time in his life? >> it was a u forric time because it followed a long struggle, obviously, around the world to try to free this man. it was the first light in this darkness that maybe apartheid would be ended. obviously his courage, his inspiration, his unswerving commitment to justice inspired everyone. i had the honor of traveling with him on the plane when he went through his u.s. city tour where he wanted to thank the people in the united states who had fought and marched and fought u.s. governments to try to get sanctions imposed against the ar par tied racist south african regime and ultimately successfully did so. we have to remember the united states considered nelson mandela a terrorist. he was not taken off the terrorist list here in the united states until 2008. so he wanted to thank the people of the united states for the unswerving commitment that they had to try to support the struggle against apartheid and so there was this incredible tour and everywhere he went the outpouring of love and inspiration and euphoria was amazing. >> if i can ask you, in times like this we look at these figures and they seem so iconic, larger than life, but you spent a lot of time with this man, the person. can you offer us any glimpses into what kind of person he was in dealing with him on a one-on-one basis? >> think about the most gentle, loving grandfather you've ever met and that was nelson mandela. and yet, there was this incredible humility and strength about him. i remember asking him when we were on the plane just how he -- how he withstood the horrors of being in prison. i mean we have to remember the first 18 years when he was in prison it was without a bed, without plumbing. he only got one visitor a year for 30 minutes, one letter every six months. how did he w stand that and keep his spirits up? he said he never lost confidence they would win. he had this incredible spirit and courage and strength but he was so gentle you felt like you could tell him anything and he would comfort you, he would give you the insight, you know, whether talking about a broken heart or a struggle for justice. >> and ron, you've spent a lot of time in south africa, particularly this year. of course this man will be honored and remembered by the entire world, but how will he be remembered by his countrymen? you said for little kids it's like he's george washington? >> he is. he's everything, he's the father of the nation. schools, people learn about nelson mandela, he is south africa as we know it today because of what he did. but you also hear a lot of people say and mandela himself often talk about how he was not -- he didn't do this alone. there was a whole generation of freedom fighters who were there for much of his life, he was a banned figure, he couldn't be quoted publicly, he couldn't be in a room with pore than one or two people and then, of course, he was in prison for 27 years from the time until he was about 70 years old, the most productive years of most people's lives, 50s, 60s, 70s, 40s and even younger, so it's really hard to overstate how significant he is. when you're in south africa, his image, his aura, the standard, the moral standard, he's the conscience of the nation. every leader there is measured by what he did. and the progress and future of the country are measured by his dream and what he thought this country should be, the rainbow nation. in many respects it is. in many respects it isn't. south africa has one of the largest divides between haves and have nots in the world. while there's a lot that has t >> have a safe trip and we look forward to your reporting from south africa. leela mcdowell, thank you for your insight this morning. >> thank you. >>> ahead, the day's other top stories. which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than her minimum payment on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. 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[knock] no one was at home, but on the kitchen table sat three insurance policies. the first had lots of coverage. the second, only a little. but the third was... just right! bear: hi! yeah, we love visitors. that's why we moved to a secluded house in the middle of the wilderness. just the right coverage at just the right price. coverage checker from progressive. you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3 creepy gnomes ♪ 2 angry geese ♪ and a giant blow-up snowman ♪ that kind of freaks me out [ beep ] [ female announcer ] no one delivers the holidays like the u.s. postal service. priority mail flat rate is more reliable than ever. and with improved tracking up to 11 scans, you can even watch us get it there. ♪ he was a matted messiley us in a small cage. ng day. so that was our first task, was getting him to wellness. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers, you can find it all on angie's list. we found riley at the shelter, and found everything he needed at angie's list. join today at angieslist.com >>> now to some other stories making news this morning. vice president biden wrapped up his visit to china on thursday raising the issue of the treatment of american journalists in that country. nearly two dozen journalists from different american publications are in danger of not having their visas renewed by year's end. biden argued newspapers should be able to, quote, report the truth without fear of cups kwepss. >>> police have arrested an 18-year-old for allegedly stealing a porsche from the part of the car that allegedly killed actor paul walker. the suspect posted panels of the roof panel on line bragging about the grab. >>> at navy launched a drone from a submerged submarine thursday. it was fired from a torpedo tube and flew for several hours while transmitting live video. >>> just ahead we'll turn to politics. politico's kevin cyrilly joins us. . >>> welcome back. time for our first look at politics. joined by politico's kevin cirilli live in washington. >> good morning. happy friday. >> president obama had an interview with chris mathews on "hardball." we'll talk on the other side. >> both hillary and joe would make outstanding presidents and possess the qualities that are needed to be outstanding presidents. they -- i think joe biden will go down in history as one of the best vice presidents ever and he has been with me at my side in every tough decision that i've made from going after bin laden to dealing with the health care issues to you name it, he's been there. hillary i think will go down in history as one of the finest secretaries of state we've ever had and helped to transition us away from a deep hole we were in when i first came into office around the world. >> so, of course, he was weighing in on possible democratic candidates for 2016. what do you make of that? is that as far as he's ever going to go? >> two things. the first thing is that this is still very early and i think ha the president doesn't really want to be talking about his predecessor, but the second point is, it's good news for the vice president because he is being mentioned as a top tier alternative to hillary clinton earlier this week, senator elizabeth warren, a democrat from massachusetts, said that she would not be running for president so good for biden for keeping his name in the mix. >> and that interview took place at american university in front of a lot of college-aged students. it's hard to imagine that he would have any trouble with that group because young people propelled the president into the white house. do you think that he's going to have trouble convincing this group to sign in, to buy into the affordable care act, which he needs for it to be successful? >> we 20 somethings like to procrastinate and that's bad news for obama because he does, as you mentioned, he needs those 20-somethings and millennials to enroll in obama care to get the numbers up. he's launched a three-week tour in which he will be speaking at colleges and universities trying to urge them to enroll so he can get those numbers ahead of the december 23rd deadline so folks can get enrolled by january 1st. >> we heard the president talk about a lot of issues from income inequality to raising the minimum wage to immigration. what issues will be at the forefront of his agenda as we enter 2014? >> i think he would like to see something get done on minimum wage but i'm not sure much can get done. all eyes will turn to this budget deal between representsive ryan and murray to see if they can prevent another shutdown. >> thanks for your time as always, kevin. >> thanks for having me. >> this is "first look" on msnbc. stay with msnbc for more coverage of nelson mandela's death. "way too early" starts right now. >> i have challenan idea of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony. and -- and with equal opportunity. it is what i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be it is for which i am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to
CNN
Dec 5, 2013 2:00pm PST
respects to nelson mandela at the age of 95, who has just passed away. we heard the announcement from jacob zuma, the president of south africa. we want to welcome our viewers who may just be tuning in here in the united states and around the world. we'll have special breaking news coverage of the death of nelson mandela here in "the situation room." we're watching what's going on, christiane and robyn kurnow is in johannesburg watching what's going on as well. we will only now begin, christiane, to get reaction. i'm sure that leaders around the world will want to speak out and pay their special respects to this world leader, from the president of the united states, the leaders in europe, africa, all over the world. it's only just beginning now. >> reporter: that's right. indeed, president zuma paid tribute to how much nelson mandela had been embraced by the world, that he was also the global representation of this relentless and unyielding struggle for freedom and justice, and he never gave up. i remember, you know, watching him being released from prison from very far away, from her
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
>> i have spoken about freedom in my lifetime. your struggle. your commitment. and your discipline. has released me to stand before you today. but freedom wasn't easy. to reform the government, has to play peace keeper, trying to temper escalating violence between his party, and supporters of the freedom party. who wanted no part of negotiation with the government that has helps them down. thousands were killed in black on black fighting. also a powerful political force himself was crumbling. the woman who supported him so publicly during the long years of incarceration was accused of having affairs, of being linked to some of the murders. and the party that he led is an embarrassment to itself at the moment. awe owe his passing comes at the time of great concern to the country. >> whatever the concerns about where the country is now? i know that corruption continues, to be a real issue for the country. unemployment, and poverty continue to be real issues for the country, this many years now, with the anc, at the head of the political weather. >> you know, it is a combination of things. i think worldwide jobs, and labor, have -- it's a very difficult period worldwide for those but in south africa it is a place of great deal idealism, that's been cheated of it's democratic birthright in many ways. by corruption, by nepotism, and by lack of concern for those small people that have been called that nelson la used to understand were the bedrock of what makes a nation. >> well, and it is good to talk to you, greg. at this moment in time, i thank you for your insights and your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela, and these are pictures from johan news burg outside the house. nelson mandela, the u.n. secretary general, was he making a statement of the passing, just let me know. let me bring in my colleague morgan ratford. lived and talks -- i did not know this, in south africa. morgan, what are your thoughts in. >> there was in 2010, i was there as a full right and i taught at the university in turban. i was also living in johan news burg during the time of the world cup. offs friend of the mandela family, and as greg mentioned this is a very interesting time for this to be happening in south africa. as greg mentioned the anc is going through a very tumultuous period. and mandela was their symbol of hope. >> a lot to ask you, but i believe the secretary of united nations is talking about the passing of nelson mandela. >> aspirations of the united nations. he shows what is possible for our world, and we didn't within each one of us, if we believe, a three man work together for justice and humanity. he is more decisive, in dismantling the system of apartheid. he marched from detention without rancor. i was privileged to meet nelson mandela in february 2009. he insisted the credit belonged to others. i will never forget his selflessness, and deep sense of shared purpose. on behalf of the united nations, i extend my deepest condolences to his family, the people of south africa, and indeed our global family. let us continue each day to be inspired by nelson mandela's life long example, to keep walking or a better and just world. thank you. the u.n. secretary general offering his thoughts on the passing of the former south african president. morgan, you were just talking about your time in south africa, and this time when the anc is under pressure from all sides. >> for example, we had this national hiccup around julius who is the youth afc leader, and brought up some old songs that were of a time when there was a great tension between black south africans and the so called -- who live in the country, and right now at the time when south africa is trying to come together as we saw them try to come together, when the entire world is watching south africa. is there a moment here, there are certainly issues and concerns. but is this a moment here waythe passing of nelson mandela for those issues and concerns to be put to the side i am wondering what your thoughts are on this moment, this period of mourning for this country. kind of south africa will we see over the next few weeks. what might emerge? >> south africa is a country of triumph. triumph of out tragedy. if anything we will see a very resilient. >> that's my experience tells me. and i think that south africa has been a nation -- look at what it has been able to do. in just a few short years, they are experiencing much of what america experienced in the 1960's, and you are seeing their leaders come together. they are learning how to overcome. >> you are experience the release in 1993. >> right, because mandela was their first democratically elected black leader of this country. and it was a very big deal, he is from a smaller tribe, compared to the zula tribe, which is the tribe that the current president belongs to. so it is a momentous occasion, a chance for them to really show they colors. >> james joseph is with us now. the former u.s. ambassador to south africa. good to talk to you, let me take a moment -- appreciate it, thank you so much. >> good to have you with us on al jazeera america. ws of the passing ofhare with the former president. >> well, all of us are saddened, but he had such a successful life, that we have to celebrate his life rather than mourn his death. what are your memories of the man? maybe personal recollections. >> i first met him shortly after he got out of prison, and i remember him as a very personable man, who commanded a presence with a kind of royalty and an elegance even about his humanity. >> i know the basic question is yes, was you can provide some context for us, did you have a sense of the mission, the task, ahead of him, and how difficult and challenging it would be. >> he understood that very well, but because of the values that led him to where he was, he was able to take on this task with the second time with calmness, and integrity. what are your thoughts about the challenge ahead for the country. my lasting impression is reconciliation, and the feeling that if he can forgive, then who am i not to forgive. and also the feeling of the potential of the human spirit, that here was this man who lad been incarcerated for 27 years and he could come out prison talking about forgiveness, and reconciliation. i'm very optimistic about the future, south africa is well established democracy, and i think they will have difficulties ahead. but they would be difficulties if he was still president. >> the former u.s. ambassador -- james joseph on the line with us, appreciate it, thank you for your time. >> you are welcome. s. >> very strong ties. my great grandfather and gandhi were together. and they went to south africa. my great grandfather was asked to give -- when he first started his school, my demand father was his youngest student, and they were trained from that age, from the age of eight, my grandfather was trained in passive resistence. that you go, break these unjust laws, and go to jail. and you remember, if you saw the movie gandhi, and you know from the history, these people would go and break the law. and they would go inside and get arrested and go to jail. and nelson mandela carried that movement and into the black independent movement. they weren't distinct at the time, these were all about freedom. if you weren't white you weren't getting freedoms. and in the end my family had to leave because they had been involved in the antiapartheid. >> what years in. >> my family left in 1961, their business was destroyed, bulldozed by the government, because they had been involved in the financing of apartheid.nd they left butt back, we went back in the 90's, and they are south african citizens and have watched this country build. and the ambassador was right, this country was going to have problems any way. all of the money, all of the education, all of the business opportunity went to a very very small minority, and if you want to equal that out, it is going to cost, and it is going to hurt. all of those school children that left to protest, and then you saw the massacre. they shot children in the back. those children gave up their education, and it works. it was that global pressure to end apartheid, that led to it. and those very children wanted jobs in the new south africa. and they couldn't get them, because in the end, it was now -- it is now about education. so that's the problem that south africa had. they had brought them to the promise land. that's what with the country still sufficient errs from. >> 76. >> right. >> and remember at the time, the world was getting onboard with the let's do something about south africa, but the problems with ever this the wrights and great britain. ronald ragan and margaret thatcher were really the most resistence to imposing sanctions. we're saying to the president at the time, we have to do something. >> and they wouldn't. >> yes. >> and they wouldn't. >> and yet -- >> and vetoed by it. >> when mandela came out of prison, one of the it was a very very long line. and payment were wondering what that conversation must have been, and he said please give my warmest regards to madame thatcher i home to meet here one day. this man had such composure. >> you are staying here with me. let's get to white house, we are anticipating a statement any moment now. mike, let's have you to the ebbing tend that he with have the time. walk us to the president's comments. well, i think we can expect barack obama to say what he is going to say in the past, that is that nelson mandela is a personal inspiration to him. at occidental, he wasn't political active but became so. the president had sited to heros in his life, one of them is gandhi, and the other is nelson mandela. them soon mandela closed a statement saying i have fought against white domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the eye deal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony, and with equal opportunities. it is an adiel i wish to live for and achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for hi'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that idea, and he made it real. achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he has gone home. we have lost one of the most courageous, influential, and good human beings that any of us will spend time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity, and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, his journey from a prison to a president, embodies human beings and countries can change for the better. with in the lives of nations or our own personal lives. the fact that he did it all with grace, and good howmore, and an ability to acknowledge his own perfections only makes the man that much more remarkable. as he once said, i'm not a saint, unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics, was to protest against apartheid. i studied his words and writings. the day he was released from prison, gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they are guided by their hopes and not their fears. ky not fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. and so long as i live,ly do what i can do learn from him. to his family we extend our deepest sympathy, and gratitude for sharing this extraordinary man with us. his lives work meant long days away from those that loved him most, and i hope that the time spent with him brought peace and kurt to his family. to the people in south africa. and resilience that you made reel. free south africa at peace with itself. that's an example to the world. and that a the do deepest legacy so the nation that he loved. we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can for the example he set, to make decisions guided not by hate but by love, never discount the difference that one person can make. to stride for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands. and bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice. may god bless his memory, and keep him in peace. >> remarked on the passing of nelson mandela from the president of the united states. for those of us just joining us, we received word on the passing of the former president of south africa, nelson mandela at the age of 85. he had been ill for some time. he was in and out of the hospital most of the summer, suffering through lung problems so he wantedded with pneumonia. we received word from the family that mande
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 7:00pm EST
. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the marque honors nelson mandela. here is a picture of the marque, we are getting ready for a live shot. we have consider spot don'ts automobile across the united states and the world. we also have guests hire in the studio, right now my colleague is here, talk a little bit about the incredible significance of this man, and what his passing means in. >> absolutely. john, i was in that home in south af
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 8:00pm EST
antiapartheid leader. this as scene outside the family home. early in the morning, now nelson mandela the first president of south africa has died surrounded by his wife and family. he was 95. from there around the world, people are paying tribute to the freedom fighter. i was with him in his home. >> which is where i met mr. mandela when i was with jesse jackson. >> what was that like. >> this is a man whose mind is so sharp. in that in his voice, hello. are you happy to see me today. i said i am sir, i am here to see you today. he was eating breakfast, and reading newspapers in four different languages. reading in zulu, reading in english, it was really remarkable. how sharp his mind was, if i can only be that sharp at that age. >> clearly, when i look at a picture like that of you, and this group that had come to see nelson mandela. >> his life was pretty great then. >> obviously, you weren't around when a lot of the bad things happen. >> you are showing my age, john. i think yo are showing my life. as i mentioned to you elier, this was very symbolic especially because he is from a tri
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 2:00pm PST
nelson mandela at the age of 95. our coverage continues with the ed show. >> good evening, americans and welcome to the ed show tonight. we start with tragic breaking news. former south african president nelson mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leader
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm EST
that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands. and bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice. may god bless his memory, and keep him in peace. >> remarked on the passing of nelson mandela from the president of the united states. for those of us just joining us, we received word on the passing of the former president of south africa, nelson mandela at the age of 85. he had been ill for some time. he was in and out of the hospital most of the summer, suffering through lung problems so he wantedded with pneumonia. we received word from the family that mandela was still fighting that he was struggling. let's get to mike now. the president has often called nelson mandela a personal hero. he visited the nation in june. >> right. >> a personal hero, and an inspiration, and you heard the president recount this often told story. as a college student, he got involved in the antiapartheid movement. at that time, his first exposure, inspired to politics by nelson mandela, and the president said something else that he said before. and i think it really strike as
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 4:00pm EST
>> this is al jazeera america live from new york. i'm jonathan betz with today's top stories. [ singing ] >> south africa begins its farewell to legendary freedom fighter nelson mandela with a day of prey and reflection. >> south korea expands its air defense zone raising tensions in asia >> and the heartland takes a hit from storms. today it's headed for the east coast [ ♪ music ] >> remembering nelson mandela. today was a day of national reflection. there was no bigger church or congregation than the people at the catholic church in south africa. [ singing ] >> the sounds of soweto, of a nation on what is not just another sunday. [ singing ] >> the congregation of the biggest catholic church in this largely christian country celebrates nelson mandela in song and prayer. similar services in all faiths are held across south africa in a day of reflection. >> we gather here to thank god for his life. we thank god for the blessing he bestowed on this world through the life of madiba. >> this church holds a special place in the history of antiapartheid movement. it was a sanctuary for protesters, sometimes violated by the police. >> so why do you think police threw tear gas inside the church to get them out. it was very bad. >> father sebastian shows us the bullet holds from the battles years ago. >> we could have had them filled, but it's a reminder why the church was important. >> that's what the congregation heard - remember nelson mandela, but move forward. >> he's paved the way for us. we have to walk on the path. >> it's important to remember nelson mandela liberated south africans. he liberated us from pressive >> res onnating for those old enough to remember the fight and those too young to know him as anything but legend. >> he's died. we don't know what's coming >> does the future worry you. >> yes. everyone is in the street celebrating. how do we sustain that and translate them? >> nelson mandela will not be laid to rest for another week. today, in houses of worship across the country, south africa began the long goodbye to the man known as the father of this country. >> there are many more events across that country. >>> let's go nick, live in south africa. there has been so many memorials and tribunal utes. what has been happening? we spent most of the day at an th service. we saw jew, muslims and whites. it's important to note that the segregation that the country saw for decades was not only against blacks, but also indians. i spent a lot of time with an indian family. and they talked about how they had to use their own buses. they were segregated as you and i saw photos in the '60s. it was 20 years ago. it was moving for me to talk about their children. they gave me an opportunity, and i was in a woman's house and he showed her children's graduation photos and she was proud that her kids had the opportunity to go to a diverse school and university, and they grew up in an intergrated neighbourhood and schools. that is what nelson mandela's legacy is - whether you're black, white, indian - they had the opportunity that parents didn't have in the last two y have the opportunity to integ grate. all the people i talked to said nelson mandela touched me, gave me the future that my parents never had. nelson mandela wanted to create a country of diversity. a lot thank him. >> the morning just beginnings. nick schifrin live in johannesburg. >>> many gathered in los angeles to pay respects. he visited the city after being released from gaol. brian rooney is in la. how are the people there remembering nelson mandela? >> this is one of the most prominent, probably the most prominent black church in los angeles. a lot of people met nelson mandela, thought and prayed about him. they feel a connection to him. they have several services this morning. one dedicated to nelson mandela. the music is fantastic. i'd like to take a moment to take a listen to it. [ singing [ singing ] >> and, of course, there was words of remembrance from the pu pulpit about nelson mandela. >> he dismantled from his prison sell. the giant and the ungrateful wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope and liberation not only for himself, but peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> people felt a connection to nelson mandela here. many met here. we spoke to a paritioner who has been here 27 years. one of the most memorable days of her life is when she met nelson mandela. >> i will always remember is that. what is a blessing to meet this gentleman. the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. the most important aspect of our life. to forgive and move on. yes, he's my hero. he's my ta ta >> she, by the way, you may be able to tell from the accent, is from africa. i asked the senior pastor how you can remember nelson mandela in one day or hour of a sermon. he says really what you have to do is remember him and memorialize him for the rest of your life >> brian rooney in los angeles. nelson mandela was a boxer with a love of sports. the legendary freedom fighter had one regret in his life. we'll talk about that later. >> moving to increasing tensions in asia\. south korea announced an overlapping the one announced by china, harry fawcett has more. >> south korea's announcement may be about invisible lines in the air, but they extend over disputed areas of land and sea. this is a submerged rocky reef, home to a research operation and under their strategic control. south korea has asserted its right in the air above >> translation: the new korean air defense zone is modified to be in line with the country's flight region, which does no overlap with other country, it includes the air space over the waters. >> the new korean zone extends into the chine chinese one and overlaps that of japan. the government in seoul says it will not impose rules requiring foreign aircraft to identify themselves until december 15th, allowing for consultation with neighbours. >> translation: we believe if will not impact our relationship with china and japan as we try to work for peace and cooperation in north-east asia. >> south korea's president discussed the plans with vice president joe biden. the u.s. state department declared itself on the same page as seoul. china which released pictures of exercises said an ex-attended zoneway have nothing to do with maritime jurisdiction and would stay in consultation with seoul. >> south korea has wanted to extend its air zones. the coming days could allow for talks on how to manage a complex it could set the stage for what nobody wants, an accidental conflict. >> here to discuss south korea's latest move is brigadier mark kendall. general, thank you for being with us. >> sure. >> okay, what do you make of the move by south korea. why do you think they did it now? >> it was a smart move to make it clear and explicit where south korea believes their territorial rights extend into. that way they don't wake up having china declare an area that they suggest belongs to them, having korea requiring to respond. it clarifies the situation. although your headline says it increases tensions, it may decrease tensions because everyone's positions are clarified as of today >> go further with that. why do you think this may decrease tensions here? >> well, in many ways china has said that they are not trying to create instability, that this is an extension of their territorial right. it gives them an opportunity to stand behind the statement and that it's a coordinating measure, and they are not trying to extend their ability to influence the regions. it allows everyone to understand where the lines are drawn, and allows everyone to understand where the identification zone start and ends, and that clarity may reduce the tensions rather than increase tensions. >> vice president joe biden was in asia. do you think the u.s. had input into this move by south korea. >> we have a mutual security pact with korea. i can't believe south korea would have done this without close consultation with the vice president or the military staged in south korea. it will be surprises were that not to have happened. >> clearly they are having a lot of behind the scenes negotiations. long-term, do you think this will decrease tensions and solve the crisis? >> as i said, it could decrease the tensions - reduce tensions. the next step is in china's hands. they want to push this further. china wanted to accept the new status quo and move on from there. the ball is in china's court. if there's going to be increasing attention it will come from the chinese side. >> it's been a game of chest for weeks. thank you for your insight today >> tensions were high in thailand after the main opposition party resigned. the party says the people no longer accept the elected government. five have been killed and hundreds hurt since protests began last month. they are demanding the prime minister resign. >> protesters in ukraine toppled a statue of lenin. several statues have been removed from kiev. this is the largest demonstration by far. many are outraged that the government is rejecting talks with europe to keep close ties with russia. tim friend has more. >> it they poured into square they know the demonstration has to be big and loud to sustain the pressure on viktor yanukovych. on the edge. crowd young men prepared tactics for the worst outcome, another violent confrontation with riot police. a few streets away officers lined up. last week there was chaos, many injured in a place charge. now there's a standoff. riot police at the ready at one end of the street with shields and trudgeons, and at the other, protesters with their flags. they are waiting in preparation. everyone hopes there won't be the repeat of last week's violence. a solitary priest hopes his presence will bring calm. >> >> translation: i hope a new president will be elected and the blood of our youth will not be called. >> they have occupied government buildings but face a deadline to leave by tuesday morning. no one is in a mood to give in. >> i want a new government that listens to the people and doesn't treat us like animals. >>. >> we are here to fight for our lives so kids are brought up in a good country without corruption and where everything is fair. >> viktor yanukovych believes he has support to survive, with backing from moscow. the protesters realise the crisis has reached a crucial moment. >> and still ahead on al jazeera america, the latest on the major winter storm that's killed at least four and causing problems across the united states. selling gold - an olympic medal won any jesse owens at the berlin games is auctioned off. nelson mandela was a boxer, but admitted to having one regret in his life. that story ahead when al jazeera america returns. >> this is what we do... >> america tonight next only on al jazeera america i'm phil torrez. coming up this week on techknow. >> shots fired. a neighborhood under attack. >> last warning, okay? i don't want to put you in handcuffs. >> now the innovative technology that can spot a stolen car parked in the middle of a city block. >> there were multiple gunshots fired. >> it can track a gunman thousands of miles away. >> if you can track it then you can predict it. >> welcome back to al jazeera i'm jonathan betz. the nation's heardland took a beating from a major winter storm. today that storm is headed for the east coast. they are expecting snow, ice, rain from washington to boston. it knocked out power and grounded flights from texas to ohio. >> a severe gold snap is blanketing much of the nation's midsection. freezing temperatures and slick roads making for dangerous continues. in lewisville texas an ice patch sent the driver of a pick-up out of control, flipping it over a guardrail into the icy waters. the driver was killed in the crash. rescue teams called in to lift the pick-up tluk -- truck from the freezing lake. >> from texas to oklahoma, turned over trucks, traffic backed up for miles, black ice forcing drivers to creep along roadwa roadways, and some people are braving temperatures and walking. >> the back roads are really bad. >> the freezing weather knocking out power. some 400 flights cancelled at fort worth, passengers setting up camp on the floor. >> the weather will hold until after the weekend. i'm going to hunker down. >> a foot of snow fell in parts of illinois and ohio. the storm stretched far north into minister s and north dakota recollects where temperatures say temperatures hover above zero. a second storm in the west setting lows to los angeles and california. in the bay area several died from hypothermia. back east there are not many cars on the streets of new burg, indiana. one young woman making the best of the blast, lacing up her states and taking to the streets. >> that says it all, when you can iceskate on the streets, you know it's a cold, bad stom. >> it's really creating treacherous conditions, particularly across i-80 and i70. we are seeing nothing but snow, all the way back to indiana and across the up of michigan. if you travel there, take it easy on the roadways. the encentre is across the indecent. you can see the snow pushing to the north across portions of illinois, on into indiana. it's a slow go along i-80. this is the scene in philadelphia. great fans out there. chilly 28 in philadelphia. nothing but snow. three inches of snow during the time of the game. by the end of the night they could see six inches of snow. we are looking at mixed precipitation. i-95. you have to take it easy, the snow making its way into new york city. travel at the airport is nasty. jfq, la guardia, newick. looking at delays. there was a stop in philadelphia due to ice and snow. airplanes can't take off in the ice. we need to keep that in mind. call your provider ahead. don't head to the airport and be stuck, unable to get home. call your airport provider. we have storms across virgin. i81 will be treacherous all the way from mary land down to rowan okays. if you are travelling again, folks there beicing the planes. it's a mess. look at the temperatures. new york city at 33, philadelphia 28, washington 30. textures will plummet below freezing. this is the philadelphia international airport. they are deicing the planes, they are grounded due to the snow, rain and ice. it will switch to rain tomorrow. as for tonight and tomorrow, take it easy. >> back to the other top story, remembering nelson mandela, the freedom fighter said he had one regret. that he never became is bombing world champion. he never made a name in the ring, but he inspires at the gym where he used to train. nick schifrin has more. >> this street once hosted apartheid's bloodiest battle. today it thanked its famous resident for winning the fight. the protest songs, ice-cream sellers hocked in two languages. in a white corner stephen canta thanked nelson mandela by teaching a different kind of fight. he was a champ and teaches kids to box because nelson mandela had him. >> he instilled to me that i must do this job. >> nelson mandela urged stephen canta to help his community. stephen canta teaches kids to take anger out in the ring not the streets. >> we live in apartheid. i want to show other children how much they need in life. >> nelson mandela loved boxing and considered it an outlet for stress and anger. whilst running the first law firm he trained here. today it's the soweto ymca. >> i used to get in trouble, so i started boxing. >> what kind of trouble? >> you know. >> young men from soweto train in a modern space. when nelson mandela boxed the ring was made of concrete. [ inaudible ] >> thanks to nelson mandela. >> thanks to nelson mandela. >> thanks to nelson mandela's south africa's fight is kept inside. ring. >> it's changed, all the fighting. >> right here, the equipment that nelson mandela would have used. >> out back a security guard showed me equipment nelson mandela would have used. mem bris -- memories of a boxer who showed a different fight. is >> and michael is here with sport. i didn't realise nelson mandela was a boxer. >> a good boxer. >> let's turn to the nfl. adrian peterson, minnesota vikings, was carted off the field with an ankle injury after a tackle by arthur brown. he won the vible player award. he was questionable to play due to a groin injury. he was the leader with 1200 and 8 yards. history made in park city utah. the united states had all three podiums in a world cup world cup bob sled event. el-lana my exercise aja evans took home gold, jaumie grooubel and lol low jones tie toed silver. both of those are track competitors. >> one of the four medals won by jesse owens at the 1936 olympics in berlin sold for $1.46 million - the highest praise paid for a piece of moik memorabil memorabilia, shattering the $865,000 paid for a silver sup won by the winner of the first modern day marathon in 1896. >> still ahead - enter a world beyond your imagination. the cutting edge of computer imagery. >> and it's called over the river, a project with a $20 million price tag, but it has environmental groups power of the people until we restore outraged. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. here is a look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are being held across the globe to remember one of our greatest leaders. >> increasing interpretations in asia over the disputed islands. south korea announced new air defense zones, overlapping that of china. >> a cold snap is gripping much of the nation. several deaths have been linked to freezing temperatures. the driver lost control of the vehicle. a major storm is moving east, bringing messy conditions and airport delays from virginia to new england. the freedom to marry outside the race was part of the south africa that nelson mandela dreamed of. mixed race marriages was unheard-in the '80s but are still seen as abnormal. >> this couple is married. nelson mandela fought to end inequality and racial segregation. couples today doan have to hide their relationships. being a mixed race couple still have challenges. >> people have accepted that we have merged, but not this close. so it's okay to work work someone and, you know, have cove with them. when it gets personal it's a bit weird. so that's what i think, people have not really tried the closeness, lived with you, touched you, eat with you. that's what i find is uncomfortable tore some. >> they say racism is a problem. some blacks don't like blacks, and some whites don't like blacks. they hope it will change. >> one of our friends at our wedding was watching the table in front of him. there was whites, blacks, coloured and he was like, "man, i wish all of south africa would be like this." my response was, "that's my south africa." for some it's not like it. >> the ban on mixed marriage was scrapped. it signalled the end of white rule and nelson mandela's release from prison. nelson mandela died on thursday, people are living cards and flowers at his house. this used to be a white neighbourhood. you used to see only black as gardeners. the reconciliation is still a work in progress. nelson mandela will be buried on sunday, 15th december. it's up to south africans to make nelson mandela's dream a reality. >> to talk about the historical context of nelson mandela and the antiapartheid movement we are joined by william werger, a history professor at the california university in los angeles. you studied south africa. when authorities look back at nelson mandela, since he did come with controversy, what do you think they're going to say. >> i think they'll say he was a significant leader in the anticolonial struggle in the "40s and "50s. he was an inspirational leader and he was an important political figure post 1990 in bringing about a democratic south africa that has been stable since his release from prison. >> there has been comparisons made with nelson mandela and gandhi, george washington. do you think that is fair? >> they are reasonably fair. as to its significance, it has to be put into context with other people that has to be put he has to be compared with other people, but as an inspirational figure he's up there with gandhi. >> do you think his work has been overshadowed - sorry, the work of others has been overshadowed. he was part of a movement. many others fight apartheid during that time and lost their lives? >> i think so. he was a founder of the african national congress youth league in 1944. those people called for self determination. there were a large number of them. there were others like olivier tambo and the president of the a.n.c. during the '60s, who died and perhaps was killed by the south african government. a person with home your viewers may be aware of steve, murderedered in 1977. >> as we move forward and look at south africa and the issues and problems do you feel the legacy and mess age has been >> the legacy, and it goes back to the same people who fathered the youth league. south africa must be a place in which there's self determination. it goes back to the congress, going back to all who lives within it, everyone that participates in the governing structure. >> thank you for your insight. we appreciate it. >> french president issued a veiled warning to the leader of the central african republic. francis hollande warned it would be tough to keep central african republic's president in place given the worsening violence. 400 bodies have been found in the capital in the past three days. 10,000 fled the city. everyone has been ordered off the streets bar peacekeepers and bars. some images from this report may be disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. this is new to the city, and welcomed by many. they are here to reassure people at the moment there's no food or medicine. there's little the french can do about the growing sectarian violence between muslims and christians. >> we muslims have been here for 200 years. they are killing us every day. anti-balaka militias killed 260 people. they slaughtered us. >> this is where many christians are sheltering. they are close to the bangladesh -- bangui airport under the protection of french soldiers. there's be 2,000 more soldiers here son, heading to different parts of country where hundreds of thousands lost their homes. too late for the people in this hospital, evacuated after attacks by fighters in a mainly muslim seleka group. >> the hospital is empty. it used to treat hundreds of people. what happened here on friday night and the early hours of saturday is horrific. >> seleka forces went inside and dragged out injured people, killing at least 10. nine months ago the rebel group seleka marched into bangui. bringing thousands of foreign fighters. the man who led the rebellion is holed up in the base. and will not accept this his power is slipping away. >> how can you call yourself a head of state, of a country you have no control over. >> translation: it's too much to say i have no control. i control my men. the men i can't control is not my men. there is score settling after 10 years of francois bozize, all the crimes he committed that he's not answered for. >> anti-balaka includes members of the arm any of former president francois bozize. al jazeera learnt that they are outside bangui waiting for reinforcements. the people here are waitin for the next big battle. this time around the french and african forces have a chance of preventing for bloodshed. >> a team of u.n. weapons inspectors arrived in iran to tour a nuclear facility, the first time they've visited the site in more than two years. president obama said the pursuit of a longstanding deal with iran is as likely to fail as it is to succeed. iran has agreed to roll back its enrichment of uranium, which it uses to generate nuclear energy. the program could also build a bomb. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible ke any country, to change over time. it may not be likely. you know, if you ask me what is the likelihood that we are able to arrive at the end state i was describing earlier, i want say it's more that 50/50, but we have to try. >> iran, the u.s. and five other powers will meet to discuss implementing an great on the program. hassan ni says the deal that lists sanctions has helped his country's economy. >> controversy over the latest project by artist christo. he'll spread fabric high above the arkansas river. some say it will damage the eco >> it's called "over the river", and this is the river, the arkansas in south central colorado. what christo wants to do is suspend hundreds of huge panels of silvery cloth, six miles of it, in eight sections along a 42 mile stretch of the river. his drawings show how the sunlight will filter through the fabric. christo says the best way to see it will be from underneath on the raft drifting through the canyon. >> there's 3,000 rapids. spectacular to see it from within the space created play of life passing under the fabric, reflecting up, not down. worked on, "over the river" for 20 years, they needed permission because the promote is in protective land. chri christo is raising the $50 million by selling works which he makes by hand. christo and his wife, jeanne-claude became known for controversial problems, each unique in its own way. >> the project is in the mind of thousands trying to stop us, s. i say you are part of the project, willing or not willing, you relate to the project and created the energy. stereo christo says he and jeanne-claude travelled all over the rocky mountains scouting 89 rivers before deciding this one, the arkansas was perfect for the project. critics of "over the river" say it's anything but the ideal location. >> it's on the scale of a mining operation. >> ellen bauder is the vice president of roar, standing for rags over the arkansas river. they are taking legal action trying to stop "over the river", saying the work will damage the landscape. >> it's a major construction project in an area of critical environmental concern. >> christos team said they'll minimise the damage. others say they'll support the project. i think it will create tension for this part of colorado. i think it will do a lot to put this area on the map. >> assuming christo wins the final round of legal wrappingling, construction will take two years. when it's completed "over the river" will be up to two weeks. christo is famous for outmanoeuvring his opponents. at 82 years old "over the river", could be one of his last works. >> a potentially major breakthrough in a fight against cancer. doctors in new orleans say an experimental treatment could mean a cure for people with leukaemia. it's a gene therapy altering white blood sells. doctors say the success rate has been stunning. >> well, it looks like the ultimate video game console. scientists at the university of illinois are taking 3d computer imaging to the extreme to better understand their research. we have this report. >> in this stunning 320 degree cavern data comes to life. numbers transform into a flight to the service of mars. known as the cave-2, this large-scale environment as dreamed up by computer scientists at the university of illinois in chicago. think of a project room and a war room where you hank up pieces of paper and photographs and you tape them to the wall. you can see a lot of data at the same time. today data is stored in ers. rather than print them out we wanted electronic walls where you can display information. the cave-2 can transform skype tists using data from an mri. it can provide critical underings of how depression manifests in the mind. >> you have a different perspective like "alice in wonder land", where you can be big or shrink down the rabbit hole. >> researchers say the applications are seemingly endless. interdisciplinary collaborations are at the heart of the mission, taking zeros and ones, and bringing them to life. >> in 2009, nasa funded the endurance research project to study extreme underwater s. the team dropped a 600 million robot into lake bonny, using sonar to collect data. >> we had the robot running sonar, sending out pings through a fault layer, making it tricky. >> universitiry of illinois peter doran headed up the exhibition. >> we can head up a digital map. it's a dataset. >> that data processed inside cave-2 is providing key insights into what kind of life can be sustained in icy bodies of water beyond the planet. >> europa has an icy shell. it's almost certain to have an ocean. this is a small-scale analogue to what that life might be. whenever you find water, you find life. >> cave-2 and visualisations are one small step for computer skype tists and a leap for explorers and researchers. >>. >> i know it's meant for science, but it looks like it will be great to watch tv on. >> michael eaves will run down the big game. >> hundreds gather to mark a 33rd anniversary of nelson mandela's death. more when we return. every sunday night al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. an act of terror then a rush to justice for pan am flight 103. >> the eyes of the world will be on us. >> an investigation under scrutiny. >> it looks nothing like him. somebody's telling lies. >> this was a miscarriage of justice. >> did they get the wrong man? >> there's something else going on. >> a shocking documentary event begins with: the pan am bomber on al jazeera america presents. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with a quick look at the top stories. >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the legacy of nelson mandela. religious services are hold across the globe to remember one of the greatest leaders of our time. increasing tensions in asia over disputed islands in the east china sea. south korea expanded its air defense zone to overlap with one announced by china. it goes into effect next week >> a cold snap is gripping the nation. self -- several deaths have be have been linked to the weather. >> messy conditions and airport delays. >> hundreds gathered to remember johnnon on the anniversary of his death [ singing ] >> fans met in central park to honour the former beatle. toward marking 33 years since he was shot to death outside his apartment building. people gathered at strawberry field, a favourite spot renamed in memory of him. >> michael is back with sport. nfl games are getting critical. >> there's a handful of games. people are jockeying for important position. there's only four weeks remaining in the schedule. we had teams solidifying play-offs. others are trying to call one out. both scenarios are in play as the philadelphia eels hosted the lions, the eagles entered the game tied with the cowboys. dallas hosted a tie break erg. the lions head up north. they had more than their opponent to worry about as mother nature showed up in the form of a snow tomorrow. nothing could stop the players, mccoy with 217 rushing yards, including runs of 57 and 40 yards. the eagles rushed for 299. nick foles got in on the party, taking one in from one yard out. eagles winning 44-20. joining us from philadelphia is john henry smith. this is a big game for the teams, but the eagles on top. >> absolutely. 34-20 is the final here from philadelphia. we have receiver nate here with us, kind enough to join us after a difficult day. thanks for joining us. you can't see from up higher on tv, but on the field this snow is very high. is this representative of how bad it was out there? >> 100%. it was thick, that's what we knew we were going to get. once i came out for warm-up, we instituted that we have to be smooth so we stay on the feet. we did a good job of that, we had good clats in the shoes, but it didn't help us enough. >> what is the post mortem on this game? went to the looker room with confidence. philly came out firing, they made the tough plays in spite of weather that we didn't make. you have to give them credit. they played a full game. that's something we didn't do. consistency is something we'll have to hit on. >> is it surprising that cheedy mccoy was able to make the cut that he makes in the second. first half look the like he was running in six inches of snow. in the second he looked like he was running his normal style. >> i think he made his mind up that he was going to get back to how he runned the ball. initially players are taken aback in the snow trying to figure out footing. i don't know if he changes cleats, and he made cuts and it gives him an advantage. when you play in weather companies -- conditions like this, it's tough on defenders. he did a good job. >> lions - 7 and 6. green bay run and have aaron rodgers coming back. how much is the loss and what is happening in green bay - how does it change the race going forward? >> it doesn't. we said one we got too the late we don't want to focus on other teams. we have to win. that's ultimately what it comes down to, if we win and play how we play it doesn't matter what in else does. we are not concerned looking at other teams, figuring out the positioning of play offs, we are losing focus. >> they say teams are not built to play in weather conditions like that and not built for the play-offs. after this games, do the lions if the the stereotype? >> i don't think so. in the beginning the conditions were worse for everyone. snow was coming down heavier and the temperature of the body drops. it was a clear representation of what it will be like. we played well. we played a better first half than them, we didn't play the duration of the game. anyone that wants to question if we are an outside stadium team. i would have to differ. we didn't play consistently enough, if you want to question that, i might agree with you. >> you guys have three games left, the ravens next week, and the giant. both of those at home. you finish up in minnesota. certainly it will be games, must-win situations if you want to make the play-offs. thank you for joining us, safe travels home. that was nate with us here in philadelphia as the philadelphia eels defeated lions 34-20 taking a more commanding position. we talked about the lions schedule, the eagles - they'll finish the last game of the season with dallas, chicago and minnesota. >> john henry smith live in philadelphia. thank you so much. let's go to the afc where the indianapolis could maintain a title if winning to the broncos, or a win over the bengals, who are yet to lose at home. both teams carrying 8-4, the winner has a leg-up on the race for the number three. cincinnati took control, jumping to a 24-0. andy dalton finishing. coming up later we have some even crazier games to show you with wild finishes. all throughout the nfl, and a lot of the time the snow had a lot to do with it, including adrian peterson hurt in a game >> snow is the most striking thing. it's unbelievable. >> still ahead - the latest on the major winter storm that killed at least four people and is creating dangerous conditions across the u.s. the stream is uniquely interactive television.tÑ >>> winter is here. maybe not officially. take a look at the snow coming down across much of the country all the way from iowa back into illinois, across portions of michigan, also making its way into the ohio valley and the i-95 corridor, where folks are travelling. you really want to use precaution on the roadways around washington d.c. where there's mixed precipitation. across the south-east it's rain, heavy rain coming down along i-20. across the southern portions of louisiana, around new orleans, where there's a dense fog advisory in effect. if you travel along i-10, you want to use precautions. on this side i should move to the other side of the screen so you can see the dense fog advisory across southern louisiana. back to the main weather story, being the snow, rain and freezing rain. there's a 50 car pile-up across portions of pennsylvania state turn pike, we looking at the snow having a major impact, pushing up the i-95 corridor, witching to freezing drizzle tracking to the overnight, hours. in addition to that a switch over to rain in the morning. this is philadelphia, and we are looking at 4.5 inches of snow. in philadelphia, a winter storm warning and portions of mary land down to rowan oaks. travel treacherous across the roadwa roadways. again, take it easy. >>> i'm jonathan betz, here are the stories al jazeera is following at this hour: a steefr cold snap is gripping much of the nation. several deaths have been linked to the freezing temperatures, including the driver of a truck that lost control after sliding off a bridge in texas. messy conditions and airport delays from virginia to new england. >> increasing tensions it asia over the disputed islands. south korea is expanding its air defense zone obvious lapping with one announced by china, and going into effect on december 15th >> people across south africa and the world are honouring the
PBS
Dec 5, 2013 4:00pm PST
nelson mandela had been released from prison but now that it has it is after midnight right now. a lot of people will not have heard what has happened. we're likely to see people bit of openery space everywhere in south africa. they will be mourning their hero, their father. that he we we called him in south africa. father to the nation. he is not a saint but he has been good for the reconciliation process of south africa. >> james, i will be with you in a second but i do want to bring ofwers to this view president obama. here is what he had to say. nelsonis trial in 1964, mandela close to statement from the dock saying i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideals of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. an ideal that i hope to live for and achieve. it is an ideal, for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. .oday, he has gone home we have lost one of the mos
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am PST
. nelson mandela, a guiding force for millions, revered for ever changing history. >> recognize that apartheid has no future. >> he spent nearly three decades in prison, emerging to become the first black president of south africa. a father figure to his people and to millions around the globe. this morning, new reaction from every corner of the world. >> i cannot fully imagine my own life without the example that nelson mandela set. >> right now on "america this morning," abc news remembers nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. ♪ >>> and good friday morning. people around the world are remembering nelson mandela. the global symbol of fore behrens, peace and dignity. >> here's a live picture from south africa, where people have been celebrating the former leader's life by dancing in the streets throughout the night. you see a large crowd gathering there right now. >> abc's alex marquardt is there in johannesburg, where they're still trying to come to grips with the death of an icon. >> reporter: a new day has dawned here in south africa. there's a profound sense of loss and
NBC
Dec 10, 2013 2:05am PST
mind me saying involves you being one of the first two african-american students at the university of georgia, 1961. it was a big deal and a big story at the time. >> well, you know, these relationships are intertwined. the civil rights movement and the movement to free south africa, you know, there are parallel histories, many of the same objectives, freedom and equality. and many people don't know this because they associate martin luther king primarily with the u.s. civil rights movement. but when mandela was in prison, he went in '61/'62, martin luther king spoke and described south african racism as the worst in the world, and he said even denying blacks the basic right of nonviolent protests. and, of course, you know, everybody's comparing mandela to gandhi and martin luther king, although, you know, neither of them was in favor of violence. but nelson mandela went to violence not to take over the country but to get the white minority regime to listen to the demands of black people. but even early in '64, martin luther king was calling for nelson mandela's release. in 1965, he spoke in london and called for internal sanctions. he echoed that in the '80s. and, of course, as you know, the free south africa movement in which president obama spoke about being a part of as a young student was very much a part of the ultimate number of things that brought an end to apartheid in south africa. i was here in '85. and as you said, it was a gruesome, gruesome period. and i went to a hilltop so that i could overlook the prison where they said nelson mandela had a garden that he used to tend. and i was so hoping, if i couldn't see him, i could see the garden. but, of course, i was followed by state security people and had to leave in a hurry. >> there you are, pictures of you, as a young woman sitting down with nelson mandela. >> that was at the council on foreign relations when he made his first visit to new york. >> we're going to listen in here. this is number two man in the anc. he's gone on to be a successful businessman here in south africa. so we'll join the program and jump in here to describe events as we find out they are happening. >> we can only succeed if we reach out to each other. this is the man that we have come to say farewell to, a man who has built our nation. in many ways, we are here today to tell madiba that his long walk is over, that he can finally rest, that he can enjoy the view of our beautiful country of south africa, a view he discovered when he began working the hills of his birthpla birthplace. his long work is over, but ours is only beginning. and with that, as we walk down memory lane, i would like us now to do what he would have wanted us to do. that is to open this memorial service with an interfaith opening prayer. i would like to call upon chief rabbi warren, the hindu faith, of the muslim faith and archbishop of the christian faith to come and give us opening prayers on an interfaith basis. please go ahead, chief rabbi warren. >> god and king who is full of compassion, god of the spirits of all flesh in whose hands are the souls of the living and the dead, receive we beseech you in your great loving kindness, nelson mandela who has been gathered unto his people. remember him for the righteousness which he has done. remember, o lord, how he exemplified the finest qualities of your servant, joseph, about whose great leadership, generosity of spirit and powers of forgiveness we read in your hebrew bible. joseph, the son of jacob, the son of isaac, the son of abraham, was thrown into a pit of snakes and scorpions by his brothers who were filled with hatred and jealousy towards him, and he was then sold into slavery and exiled from his father and from his home for 22 years, many of which, due to a terrible injustice, was spent in jail. joseph emerged from jail to become a leader and head of government of a mighty nation. and when he was reunited with his brothers, had the opportunity to exact vengeance and justice, and yet joseph, the righteous, transcended his personal pain and need for retribution by forgiving his brothers so that his family would not be torn apart and destroyed forever. so, too, o lord, your servant, nelson mandela, like the biblical joseph, rose up from jail to become president of a mighty nation. he, too, transcended his personal pain and years of suffering to forgive and to embrace his brothers and sisters who inflicted so much pain on him and so many millions of others in order that our diverse south african family would not be torn apart by hatred and division. madiba brought to life the ancient words of joseph when he said to his brothers in genesis chapter 50, verse 19, fear not, for am i in place of god, although you intended harm, god redirected for good in order to accomplish, as is clear this day, that a vast people be kept alive, so now fear not, i will sustain you and your young ones. and so he comforted them and spoke to their hearts. nelson mandela spoke to our hearts. he brought us comfort. and through his mighty power of forgiveness, he sustained us and liberated our country from the pit of prejudice and injustice, unleashing the awesome generosity of spirit of millions of south africans. let his reward be with them and his recompense. make light in your presence, his fullness of joy at your right hand forever more. bestow upon him the abounding happiness that he's treasured up for the righteous. o god who heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds, your consolation to the mourners. strengthen and support them in the day of their grief and sorrow and remember them and their families for a long and good life. wipe away the tears of all south africans and indeed the world. bless the people of this country, a nation of heroes who came together to transcend the pain of the past in order to build a great nation on earth and inspire our hearts to continue to walk in the path of nelson mandela, to look up to his majestic legacy. as the bible says -- [ speaking foreign language ] like one who his mother comforts, so will i comfort you, says the lord. and in jerusalem shall you be comforted. your son shall never more sit. neither shall your moon wane for the lord god shall be your everlasting light and the days of your mourning shall be ended, and let us say, amen. >> let us bow our heads and pray. ♪ [ speaking foreign language ] o lord, you are the giver of physical vigor and spiritual force. your order is carried out by all enlightened persons. your grace is immortality. your disfavor is death. to you, all bliss be offer our humble worship. for certain is the death of the born and certainly is the birth of the dead, then let's not grieve for what is inevitable. the end and the beginning are unknown. we see only the intervening formations. that is why there is no need to grieve. o supreme lord, leaders, like our father, nelson mandela, lead us from darkness to light like our father, nelson mandela, and lead us from death to immortality like our father, nelson mandela. may he rest in peace. amen. >> i begin with the opening chapters of the holy koran. [ speaking foreign language ] all praise is due to the almighty, not of the worlds who is unequal and unmatched in every one of his attributes. the beneficent, the merciful, the master of the day of judgment. [ speaking foreign language ] almighty lord, you alone do we worship. you alone do we seek assistance from. we extend our condolence to the mandela family and to the nation during this time of sadness over the passing away of madiba, a global icon of freedom in recent times. we place on record our indebtedness to madiba for his selfless efforts in salvaging the nation and leading him to the path of peace, reconciliation and harmony and laying the foundation of a free and prosperous south africa. almighty allow, our lord, our supreme lord, we beseech you that future leaders of this great country and leaders of the entire world and people of this country and people of the world would stand up for the ideals and vision our madiba strove for. as madiba never lost an opportunity to reconcile people. we pray to you, o almighty lord, let us strive towards peace, harmony, reconciliation on the basis of human dignity. as he made everyone feel important whenever he met them, we ask of you, almighty lord, let us acknowledge each other in our places of work and our places of residence. as he stood up to injustice in illegal wars, let us do likewise, even if it is waged by the powerful. as he stood up for the oppressed people of the world, we pray to you, almighty allah, to help us sustain that resolve and realize we preserve our freedom by helping others towards freedom. as he was merciful and as the prophet muhammad upon him said -- [ speaking foreign language ] have mercy and kindness to people in this world, the almighty will show kindness towards you. we ask of you, almighty, in the hearts of every human being, the seed of kindness. and as madiba lived an example showing us a spirit of self-sacrifice, we ask of you, almighty lord, grant us the grace of resisting corruption and temptation. and finally, on this prayer we ask, almighty allah, let us dedicate ourselves to the good ideals he strove to in his life. amen. [ speaking foreign language ] >> greater god, lord of life and love, you hold the whole universe in your hands. and yet you also, on all of our heads, you know the face of the nations and the hopes and fears of each individual. on this day of madiba's memorial service, we pray for peace of the world, for peace without, for peace within. jesus christ, prince of peace, may your shalom touch every place of conflict, division, brokenness or fear. may it fill our communities, families and lives from the horrors, turmoil of nations in conflict to the fragile relationships and violence of too many homes, bring your reconciling love. lord, we pray for south africa in particular on this memorial day, help us to draw on the best lessons of our past and build on a firm foundation that by your grace madiba laid for us. give us courage to hold fast to his values, to follow the example of his practices and to share them with the world. we lift our hearts with gratitude for your loving care that you have now called madiba home to his eternal rest where pain and suffering are no more. we commend you to his keeping and we commend his family to your loving embrace. as we say to madiba, go forth, revolutionary and loving soul on your journey out of this world in the name of god who created you, suffered with you and liberated you, go home, madiba. you have selflessly done all that is good, noble and honorable for god's people. we will continue where you have left off, the lord being our helper. we now turn to you, lord. it is an hour of, daness, sadness, pain and death in tears and mourning. we believe that you will console us, that you will give us the strength to hold in our hearts and minds and the courage to enact in our lives the values madiba fought and stood for. we turn to you, lord, that entrust madiba's soul to eternal rest and loving arms as he rejoins the madiba clan, his comrades and all the faithful departed, we pray particularly for his closest and dearest, for graca machel, for his children, grandchildren and all his relatives, may you surround them with your loving arms, embrace and comfort. in this dark time of mourning, at this perfect time when you have called him to rest and a perfect end. accept his soul and remember him with the company of the redeemed in heaven. console and comfort his family. console and comfort south africa, africa and the world. may his long walk to freedom be enjoyed and realized in our time by all. may he rest in peace and rise in glory. amen. nelson mandela nelson mandela nelson mandela nelson mandela nelson mandela nelson mandela madiba ♪ madiba ♪ >> lester holt, this is coming after some of the organized prayers. a little musical interlude. >> and we'll soon be hearing from the friend and family of nelson mandela here. and you see that picture right there captures so much. people of every color who have come to represent what we call the new south africa here, a true tribute to mandela as you look across this crowd here that has withstood a steady light to moderate rain all morning long. we've also been watching, of course, brian, a collection of dignitaries, and you can't really overstate the complexity of the operation of getting the celebrities, the politicians, the world leaders in here safely. the south africans said they have been studying a plan for quite some time and have been working with their counterparts in the u.s. and other countries to get everyone here safely. we were on that issue of security, we were able to get in today without screening. the crowd then were bussed in. they may have been screened at another point. but when they came in, we all saw everyone come into the stadium. that may be a reflection on the mood. this is a time of joy and a time of celebration. as you noted, the dignitaries well protected behind their bulletproof glass on the stage. at one point during one of the prayers, the crowd just above me, on the tier just above me, just broke out in spontaneous song. and you see a lot of that here. almost mini-celebrations going on within this larger memorial, brian. >> but lester, you're so right to point out to our viewers in 2013 see nothing unusual about the shots of the crowd. it looks like a crowd. it is revolutionary and remarkable when viewed through the prism of the former system of apartheid. and was just not possible back in the south africa where blacks were to leave the streets at 9:00 p.m. in populated parts of the city and brought back to the townships. this is andrew who was an inmate along with nelson mandela. and he will start our series of remembrances. [ no audio ] >> let me just jump in here. this is what we feared because of the weather. this is rain fade in the tv business, and it means that waves of rain are interfering with the ability of the satellite dish to push the signal up to space and get it back down to you. if you lose audio, if you see the picture digitize briefly, that's what we're dealing with, and it's just because of this rough weather we're having here today. lester holt can still broadcast from inside, but it's this main camera position through south african television that we're having the problem, and we will try to stay with it. >> it is a technical marvel, how quickly all this was put together, brian. the truth is -- and i think most people understand that in these situations that quietly and in a sensitive way, preparations have been under way for quite some time for the death of nelson mandela. but, of course, things, you know, many things were put into action here in these last several days including the massive contingent of press all around the world, wiring the stadium, coordinating all the satellite technology, and weather has been an issue here. we had issues earlier in the week with the steady rain. but i think it looks like you're getting a clearer picture now. so we'll let you get back to hear the speaker. >> lester, thanks. things have cleared up a little bit. >> -- and how he touched my heart, my soul, my life. and those millions of south africans and continue to touch many lives around the world even after his death. i'm overjoyed by the outpouring of love and admiration by all of you here today. madiba is looking down on us w now. and he is no doubt smiling as he watched his beloved countrymen and women unite to celebrate his life and legacy. seldom -- >> we are again experiencing some hits, as we call them, in the signal because of the weather, the thickness of the clouds here is disrupting the satellite signal just a bit as we listen to -- try to listen to andrew, a family friend of nelson mandela who is leading off the series of tributes here. the rain has been falling rather steadily. the crowd has been mostly out in it, although those in the upper tier is protected by the overhangs. brian, as we noted, this stadium can seat 95,000, clearly not that many here today, but it is still continuing to fill up. >> yeah, i have to say, lester, that's a disappointment. i anticipated a completely full venue. there were two overflow venues for up to 110,000 more. i think a lot of it is a function of "a," weather, and "b," security. but luckily our feed seems to have stabilized, so we'll continue with this. >> -- with the goal to unite all colors and creeds, mutual respect and kindness. the realization of this ideal by madiba to sacrifice his imprisonme imprisonment, for his health and well-being. despite this, he was a role model, worked hard for his release in 1990. describing his oppressors as men of integrity who were committed themselves to ushering in a new era for south africa. nelson mandela was an inspiration to millions by implementing the values of sacrifice with calm and patie e patience. he had hope when there was none. it is not possible to prepare an individual of this stature. as a young man in apartheid, the ideals that he stood for were a guiding light during uncertain times. through all the struggles that we experienced the sacrifice he was making and principles he represented. my past with madiba was in the early '50s. a friend of mine, simon, who knew him better, introduced me to him. mr. mandela, a very wise man. not knowing our lives were intertwined and bound together by destiny. wh in the early '50s, i got to know madiba better. madiba's greatness as a leader stems from his humility and his great belief in the persuasion and respect. he believed in sharing insights and listening to and learning from others. when the doors to peaceful demonstration, and other political organizations, madiba persuaded them to take up arms in defense of the right of our people. we carried out what madiba was operating on the ground, i together with five other s othe 1961 to the end of 1962 sent out to the peoples republic. i worked together with him. upon my return from china, i became a member of the national high command, an organization that was supervising the activities. on the 11th of june, 1971, together with madiba, for attempting to overthrow the apartheid government through violent means. we were eventually found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. in prison, madiba's leadership was based on collective thinking. this had a significant impact on my own work with south african citizens and anc member. without mandiba's guidance, acceptance and leadership, i would not have become the man i am today. for that i cannot thank him enough. i'm certain no individual that has been fortunate enough to benefit from the example that nelson mandela set. millions of south africans and members of the international community have tried to emulate the great man. i'm told my time is up, but it should be our collective wisdom, conviction and resolve as the community of nations to uphold the values of nelson mandela. god bless madiba. god bless your soul. may his soul rest in peace. thank you very much. >> thank you very much. our veteran -- >> we just heard from a fellow inmate with nelson mandela for all those years of imprisonment. >> -- mandela to come and pay tribute on behalf of the family. >> president of the republic of south africa, the first president, president zuma. presidents, royal highnesses, excellences, eminent persons, ladies and gentlemen, on occasions such as this, charged with raw emotions, grief, sorrow and anguish, allow me to respectfully echo, official salvations have been expressed on this solemn occasion. we gather here in person at dedicated venues in communities around south africa and via television, radio and the worldwide web to the furthest reaches of the earth to mourn the great man but also to celebrate a glorious life well lived. today, more than any other feeling my family holds, is thankfulness for that wonderful life. on behalf of the family, we take this opportunity to extend our sincere gratitude to the religious communities and various other communities around the globe for their thoughts, prayers and messages and solidarity which they have generously extended to our family. indeed our pain and sorrow is daily being lessened by the national and international for our father and elder. we have always been mindful that we share madiba with the rest of south africa, africa and the rest of the world. indeed madiba was a great man. but he was humble in all things. his soul, his greatness, not just the means to dominate or impress superiority over others, means to make all men and women equal so that their lives could be lied to the fullest human potential. to him life was all about service to others and setting them free. this is what mandela's life was about. that is his vision for south africa and africa. and his legacy leads us on. in his lifetime, madiba mingled with kings, queens and presidents and prime ministers, captains of industry and ordinary workers. every core of his being was a man of the people. a simple man that knew that no matter how many accolades he attained in life, no matter what, he knew where he belonged. the son of south africa and child of the thembu, you will always be remembered. and what is so glorious in that is mandela would have wished it among those here this morning, the powerful and the weak, the rich and the poor, the mighty and the ordinary, all here serving unified peoples to mo n mourn. i'm sure madiba is smiling from above as he looks down for this is what he strove for. the equality of man. the brotherhood of humanity and the unity until his last days. that we were blessed with this amazing icon and to have his legacy is the most precious birth right which has been bestowed on us all. as we lift our eyes to the dawn of the new era, without a madiba on our side, we hope you will join us with all persons, support you have ordered and demonstrated on every street corner of this beautiful land and in far-flung reaches of the world. this universal show of unity is a true reflection of all that madiba stood for. peace, justice, unity of all mankind. let us pledge to keep madiba's dream alive in the way in which we honor the humanity in each other, in the way in which we live in the humanity of each other and in the way in which we raise up the impoverished. and the disabled. in this regard, we, the mandela family, enter into a sovereign covenant with you, the people of our country. african citizens of the world that we will recommit ourselves to the values and the ideals madiba stood for. in this spirit, we hope that you will continue to stand by us and encourage us, guide us because of you. as a family, we have no option except to be bound by the principles of nelson mandela. for he would accept no less. let the world come from the place and far beyond our borders, that we dare not stray to uphold his legacy. we implore you to do the same. the torch is passed to the next generation of leaders who were sent to make our world a better place. our generation needs new leaders like madiba. and so, friends, at long last, they have made a call on our brother's glorious life, he is gone before our eyes but never from our hearts and minds. as we mourn today, let us not forget that the greatest witness to his life is for us all to live in testament to his legacy. although he no longer walks among us, his legacy of reconciliation, the universality of humanity must continue. with this final flame now passed on, to all nations great and small, to all peoples far and wide, let us dedicate ourselves to continuing in which we travel to a world where peace, harmony p pervades. [ speaking foreign language ] thank you. >> at this point the grandchildren will begin speaking, or at least are scheduled to. >> -- from all over the world, we have well over 91 countries that have sent delegations. and we would like to thank them for being here. we have countries such as afghanistan, angola, algeria, argentina, australia, austria, azerbaijan, botswana, barbados, united arab emirates, belgium and many others will continue acknowledging all of them as we move on. with a view of catching up on lost time, we are now going to call upon madiba's grandchildren. madiba had 18 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. we're going to call musa mandelmandela and others who are going to come and pay tribute to their grandfather and great-grandfather. i call them to come to the stage to come and express their tributes to their grandfather. >> on behalf of the family, i would like to thank all the heads of state that are here. thank you. madiba, struck by lightning bolts in the dead of night, dazed and disorientated, struggling to bid farewell to any mortal caught in the whirlwind. what do i do? when sadness and celebrations commingle, the body shudders, shakes and implodes and winds blow memories, the land dreams of a future without madiba. you are lodged in our memories. you tower over the world like a comet, leaving streaks of light for us to follow. we salute you, madiba. [ speaking foreign language ] [ spe >> you stole the fire from the gods. to light our path to freedom, of peace and reconciliation. a giant tree has fallen, scattering a billion bright leaves, each replicating a million messages of peace, of love and reconciliation. shall we walk in his footsteps. >> madiba, they say you are a brilliant man. they say you are a wise man. you remind them of a wise man, too. they say use warmth and charm. they say you are resilient. you are a mirror that reflects the glory and splendor of mind and heart. you retort, my people reflect the splendors of our dreams. you have taught us that. a group of trees break, but the tree that towers above the rest is broken by the wind. of the wind, of the land. a future where black and white, rich and poor, men, women and children must live side by side, dreaming the same dream, realizing at the crucible of time in our land, we salute you. >> thank you very much. can i ask that we should show discipline, the same level of discipline that madiba exuded when we applaud, let us applaud as someone has spoken. and behind me here i know th that -- >> the crowd has just now seen that president obama and mrs. obama have arrived. they came in quietly during the grandchildren's remarks. >> behind me there are people who are enthusiastic, can i ask for discipline, please. there are people behind me who are very enthusiastic who love madiba dearly. can we all be disciplined, please. i now ask the secretary-general of the united nations, mr. ban ki-moon, to come and pay tribute on behalf of the united nations. >> your excellency, president jacob zuma of south africa, dear loving family of nelson mandela, your majesties, your highnesses, heads of state and government, dear citizens of south africa, ladies and gentlemen, i'm deeply honored to participate in this state memorial service for the late former president nelson mandela. we join in sorrow and in celebration of a mighty life. what a wondrous display of this rainbow nature, a rainbow emerges from rain and the sun. it is that blending of the symbol of grief and gratitude that i feel today. i hope you will see the rainbow soon through the rain of sadness and the sorrow, our hearts. on behalf of dedications, i offer my deepest condolences to graca machel and the mandela family, to winnie mazikizela-mandela, the people of south africa, it is a great continent. ladies and gentlemen, this stadium holds tens of thousands of people, but even an area as big as the african continent, could not contain our pain today. south africa has lost a hero. we have lost a father. the world has lost a beloved friend and mentor. nelson mandela was more than one of the greatest leaders of our time. >> as 6:00 a.m. on the east coast approaches, many of our nbc stations are going to cut away for their programming and rejoin us when president obama gives his remarks in soweto for the nelson mandela memorial. >> -- from freedom and equality, for democracy and justice. his compassion stands out most. he was angry at injustice. not at individuals. he hated hatred, not the people. he showed the awesome power of possibilities and of connecting people with each other and with the true meaning
ABC
Dec 10, 2013 1:05am PST
tribute to the life of nelson mandela. as you described, world leaders, they're shown on the screen from time to time. people roaring their approval as they see one after another enter the stadium. and this is a stadium that has just been filled with song. with music. the south african liberation movement was a revolution in song and there are times it feels this whole stadium is one vast choir and an excellent one as well. well. you asked about it here, you can join in, there's no question about it. it's that kind of day, despite the rain. in african tradition, i'm told rain at a funeral means the person was blessed. it's been pouring here in soweto. and there's no doubt that nelson mandela is a blessing to south africa and to the world. that's what we're seeing here. it is a thrill to be here, no question about it. through this cold and soaking rain. the spirit of the place, warming this event, without question. george? >> i think we'll hope that it rains all day long there in south africa. let's go outside the stadium, as well. alex marquardt is there. alex, 100 world leaders in that
ABC
Dec 7, 2013 12:35am PST
started at the end ♪ >>> tonight on "nightline" -- for the ages. from nelson mandela's epic struggle to his long walk to freedom. "nightline" was there every step of the way. >> tonight, nelson mandela. >> tonight the freedom fighter you may not know. >> you were a good boxer? >> well, i do not know, that is the hardest to say. >> i am -- >> leading man. what do ebri alba, morgan freeman, danny glover, and sydney portier have in common? they all played nelson mandela on the big screen. >> and this boy's courageous journey inspired nelson mandela, and enkozi johnson, packed arenas and captured a nation's heart with his simple message. >> we are all the same. >> announcer: keep it rig i want you to be kind.ff i want you to be smart. super smart. i want one thing in a doctor. i want you to be handsome. i want you to be awesome. i don't want you to look at the chart before you say hi...david. i want you to return my emails. i want you to keep me doing this for another sixty years. at kaiser permanente, we want you to choose the doctor that's right for you. find your perfect match at kp.o
FOX News
Dec 10, 2013 1:00am PST
africa for the former south african president nelson mandela. the ceremony is being held at the soccer stadium in soweto. you can see it there. this is a live look. the stadium itself seats close to 100,000 people and nearly 100 heads of state are expected there as well. president obama arrived a few hours ago and is scheduled to speak. first the family members will speak after some prayers and then president obama will take the podium and speak and we'll of course have that live for you. former president george w. bush, bill clinton and jimmy carter are attending the ceremony there as well. the anti-apartheid leerd make an appearance at that very stadium for the closing ceremonies of the 2010 world cup you might remember. his last public appearance, uniting races while he did that. he died last friday. he was 95 years old and will be buried on sunday in his rule hometown. today is the memorial service. senior foreign affairs correspondence greg is at the stadium there. i understand it's raining there. i can't tell it's raining if you look at the video but the stadium is filling up and
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
. this is very much a global headline with nelson mandela. mano question, this is a who has jacob zuma, the president of south africa, said the founder of the democratic republic of south africa. it was nelson mandela who created that democracy. that is the miracle that astonished the world and made him such a world figure. he was well known while he was in prison, but when he came out of prison, there was a great question about what would happen. would there be a terrible bloodbath, with they get through the passage to democracy with apartheid? it was because of nelson mandela and his character that they did. the world recognized a peacemaker, and he developed a moral stature in the world that helped him bring south africa into the world community, help them reintegrate into the world terrible it aow role in various hot spots the world. he was very close to president bill clinton. frankly, he could not stand the policies of president george w. bush, which he saw as imperialistic. that was a bit of a public- relations problem for the bush white house. the election of barack obama, the
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 11:00pm EST
to. we tried to get that language adopted on 32. incorporate that because no one objected. the subject was address in both bills in terms of sexual assault, even though the article 32 language is not limited to it's limited for he use of procedure for discovery now that creates unfair problems for people who visits or the complainants, so we were able to get an agreement that we should address that. could not get agreement that we would address either the illibrand or mccaskill agreements. however, they are free standing bills. so lked to senator reid and has senator gillibrand and mccaskill. ll of us want votes on these matters. even though in these bills there's major improvements in the area of sexual assault. for instance, i'll give you some of them again. retaliation s that is a crime. the threat of retaliation has een one of the reasons why victims do not report the improper context or sexual behavior. o we make in this bill now that's going to be introduced in the next couple of days in the ouse and hopefully in the senate, retaliation is a crime under the ucmj. direction oint the for the commanders to be held accountable for the climate in this the units bill. e also say that the commander annot reverse a finding of a court-martial. s we've seen one of the problems which arose is when a commander reversed a finding of court-martial. and that created a -- a real problem and we've addressed that by saying that that can no longer happen. we also say that if a commander follow the advice -- excuse me, if there's a sexual complaint that is filed, that that complaint, if it does to a court-martial, level to a higher official. official. officer and ederal can go right up to the secretary of the military involved. it can go up to the secretary of army, navy. so forth. that's about four of the 20 bill on s in this sexual assault. if i can, the detailed list has circulated to all of us. >> the press release is out. press release is out. >> is it on the web or -- > in terms of the detail on what's in the bill, i don't think there's any difference between, peter? the house press release and the senate press release cover the same -- > so the description of the provisions of the bill are in both releases, even though our release is not out in terms of the rhetoric. have, what -- yes? the ch of you have leadership of either of the parties agree that the house is going to bring forward and republicans are okay with the agreement as well as the democrats? >> well, i can't answer that question right now. i have talked to them. i have two meetings before this, have another one after this as we try to get it here. even unately, some aren't in town yet. mitch mcconnell is in an airport some place unable to get out now. talked to them by phone. i see a totally different change we're in a now that point where the choices are so limited that it's either we do do it.e don't so i can't tell you that we have a commitment on the republican this, but we have a lot more support than we would have had or that we did have in the of the bill. >> leader reid is hopeful the to pass a be able bill this week so we can take it up next week. realistic here's no way of passing a defense authorization bill this year without the procedure. the emphasize this is not same procedure that's used twice in 2010 recent years and in 2008, i believe. now, in terms of the democratic we will present this to my colleagues, as a matter of be meeting with the full armed services committee 15 minutes ago. meeting with the democratic caucus tomorrow. last question, yes? >> you said -- [ inaudible question ] they're going to talk to each other. i talked to them individually. they couldn't make a commitment until they talked to each other they've done by now. >>. [ inaudible question ] >> let me go back over and tell had in the bill will be an improvement of what we've passed in the house and in committee. and it was an overwhelming vote. think ink we'll be -- i we'll be okay. i think we've addressed people's concern. thank you very much. to go get the guest the bill passed. thank you. british house of common sense celebrated nelson mandela a tribute in monday. mr. cameron will join 100 world at a memorial service tuesday in johannesburg. order. order. know how will wish to we intend today. defense questions will be for next monday. the present list of questions will be carried over. be another ot shuffle. the table office will announce changes shortly. this is a special day for special tributes to a special nelson mandela. i hope that as many members as be able to l contribute. tributes may continue until p.m. there will be no end of day adjournment debate. also wish to know that there will be an event to and celebrate the nelson achievements of taking place in westminster hall at 2:00 p.m. on thursday, the 12th of december. prime minister? >> thank you, mrk. towering dela was a figure in our lifetime, a pivotal figure in the history of south africa and the world and it's right to pay tribute to his achievements, and his legacy. he union and south african flags flew at half mast over downing street the day after his on the day ll do so of his funeral. been ence books have authoriz authorized. this evening, we will fly to the africa to attend memorial service in johannesburg highness, theroyal prince of wales will represent us in the funeral. everyone's thoughts are with the family of nelson mandela, his friends, and the millions in south africa and around the who are mourning him today. mr. speaker, when looking back over history, it can be easy to victories over prejudice and hatred as somehow inevitable as years lengthen it can seem natural progress can have humanity ever upwards away brutality and darkness toward something better. it is not so. is not just handed down as a gift, it's one through struggle, the struggle of men who believe things can be better, who refused to accept the world as it is but dream of it can be. nelson mandela is the embodiment of that struggle. himself as a helpless victim of history. the evil ofr forget apartheid and its effect on benches,life, separate separate pews in church. whole language of segregation that expressed man's inhumanity to man. was n mandela's struggle made ever more vital by acts of brutality like apartheid. his was a journey that spanned decades from his activism in the '40s and '50s through nearly decades of incarceration through the negotiations that led to the end of apartheid and election to the highest office in south africa. it was, as he said, a long walk to freedom. prisoner in a cell measuring seven feet by eight, here must have been times when nelson mandela felt that his fists were beating against a wall that would not be moved. he never waivered. as he famously said at his wanted to livehe for and achieve the ideal of a democratic and free society. it was also an ideal for which as he said clearly, he was prepared to die. lock long years of imprisonment, he lost all provisions. the sustained him was belief in human dignity, that no naturally superior over any else. work to do. in the end, the cries of an infant who dies because of a machete has se split over its stomach will penetrate the noises of the and the sealed windows to say, am i not human too? cries for ela's justice pierced the conscious of people around the world. et me pay tribute to the members of this house who considered it a part of their not to rest until ended.l of apartheid was mandela knew there were millions waysaid no to apartheid in large and small. and there can be no doubt that e had a real warmth of feeling for this country. he visited months after his release from prison and then times in the of following years, including the memorablyhe spoke so trefalgar square. he was noted not in what he fought, but in the grace he won. he could have been bitter. n his release, he could have meted out vengeance on those who had done so wrong. ut the most remarkable chapter is how he took the opposite path. choose ry, he did magnaminity. he invited his own former jailer to come to the presidential inauguration. in his secretary a young woman who became his confidante. in an image, he roused his powerful the most gesture of reconciliation. his government pursued a eliberate policy of forgiveness. f.w. declercq and other party officials were brought into his of national unity. he truth and reconciliation commission was established to break the spiral of recrimination and violence. astonishing brave moves. mandela's hope was south africa its heart and his time after office, he showed no less stepping up the fight against aids. it's been one of the great honors of my life to go to south mandela.d meet i remember discussing this issue with him in his office and determination to ensure that anti-retroviral those in h all of need. here was a man of 88 who had been imprisoned for decades and a lot of the rapid social change taking place, but who had the ision to see through destructive attitudes towards aids in south africa. marks ofe actions were his extraordinary personal leadership. and today, though challenges emain in south africa, that country is on a far more hopeful path today because of what nelson mandela did. there are signs of hope across the whole continent, in the middle in the emerging lass, in the birth of new democracies. around the world, there exists already many monuments to nelson mandela. a few hundred yards from here, the champion of democracy is bronze, arm outstretched, mid speech, beseeching those in this house o remember that democracy is a gift and a gift to be used well. there's been a lot of debate his ly about how to secure legacy. be to one part must rededicate ourselves to the in africa where 7% of the gdp and aid to ensure plays the full part. the most important monument to mandela must be the lessons that us, that there is dignity and worth in every human that an ounce of humility of orth more than a ton might. long-term change needs patience, lifetime atience of a but that change can come with determination and sacrifice. t's with sadness we meet here today to remember nelson mandela. but it is with gladness that we long y this -- it was a walk to freedom, but the walk is over. freedom was one. and after that, nelson mandela deepest enduring in this history. the place in >> ed miliband. >> we remember the uncomparable nelson mandela. this house gathers to pay led te to those who have our country. it is unusual for us to meet to another.e leader of why was it so essential that we commemorate the life of mandela in this way? for simple reasons. enduring and unique symbol of courage, hope, and the injustice.st he teaches us the power of showing no bitterness toward his captors, just a love of the country that if all so much better of its people could be free. nd he demonstrates even to the most skeptical, the power of people and politics to change world. that is why we gather here today. party, i sendof my the deepest condolences to his and , the mandela family, all of the people of south africa. mourn with them. today's an opportunity to remember the extraordinary life story of rdinary nelson mandela. anc, thatmovement, the liberated a country. and dured the suffering prison.ce of 27 years in a son unable to attend his father funeral, a unable to attend his son's. such the face of oppression, his spirit never bent or broke. offered the chance of release in 1985 after more than 20 years in jail, on the condition that he ive up the struggle, he refused. sell my birthright nor am i prepared to sell the to be ght of my people free, he said. we honor him, too, because of the remarkable person that the orld found him to be after he walked out of prison in 1990. remember.nes we all archbishop omrade desmond tutu said, it can inable the sufferer, there can be than g more noble determining not to seek revenge but to seek reconciliation with them. he was, as archbishop tutu said magnanimity. that is why he became not just a but truly struggle can be described as the father of a nation. as we have seen in the tributes and the nation, he's inspired in the black and white communities of south africa. because nor him too, for him the struggle against never ce is a story that ended. having been an activist that president, he was a president who became an activist once again, campaigning on hiv s from debt relief to aids to the war in iraq. e honor somebody too, who wore his extraordinary her rowism humility.st the year he gave up the the labor, he came to party and described himself as pensioner with a criminal record. tutumously said to desmond who teased him for his taste in that's pretty thick coming from a man who wears a dress in public. empathy led him to seek out not the most famous in the room, least, and his work made very person he met walk toward him. we see a man who showed the true meaning of struggle, courage, and humanity. mr. thered here now, speaker, also to recognize our country's history is bound up. in the spirit of truth and reconciliation, south africa as, after all, a british colony. later, britain would become in mandela's own words the second headquarters of our movement in exile. he prime minister and i and thousands of others went to sign the condolence book at south africa house on friday. easy to forget now, the south africa house was not always such a welcoming place opponents of apartheid. o we should remember today the hundreds of thousands of people who were the anti-apartheid movement in britain. the people who stood month after month, year after year, on the when the hat embassy call seemed utterly futile. he churches, trade unions, campaigners who marched, supported the struggle financially, culturally, and so ways.other the people who refused to buy prodigies and call for special elections. people whose names we do not who from all over britain are part of that struggle as well as those who will be etched history, including the leaders of the movement who sanctuary in britain, like ruth first, joe sliver, and others. f the house will allow me, those in my own party who played such an important role, like bob in the house of lords. more.o many, many odd to ker, it may seem a younger generation that the as long as itived did to now be universally world over.the he cause was unfashionable, dangerous by those in authority, and opposed to those in government. minister was right a few years ago to acknowledge the history. spirit of what nelson mandela taught us, to acknowledge the truth in the and without rancor, honor past.ange that's come to but also to honor his legacy by acknowledging in every country the battle of wn racial injustice needs to be won. so we come here to honor the our history.wledge and also for one final reason -- to recognize and uphold the universal values for which nelson mandela stood. dignity of every person, whatever their color or creed, alue -- the value of tolerance and respect for all. and justice for all people wherever they may live and oppression they may face. "i son mandela himself said, am not a saint, i am a sinner who keeps on trying." his extraordinary life calls on trying.to keep on for nobler ideals, higher bigger and d for a not smaller politics. inspired by his example, and the movement he led. we mourn his loss, we give thanks to his life, and we honor his legacy. liberal alf of the democrats, i want to add our voice to the many tributes to mandela, the father of modern south africa. the thoughts and condolences are his loved ones, the people of south africa, and everyone grieving his ld loss. nelson mandela's message transcended the boundaries of nations, people, creeds. and and his character transcended boundaries too. he was a politician. but appeared to be free of all of the pettiness of politics. warm human being with a mischievous wit, yet seemed to normal human frailties of anger and hurt. he was a man who was well aware in history, but he didn't want to be placed on a pedestal and was humble at all times. so with qualities like this, it that millions r of people who did not meet him in person, nonetheless, feel hero and a st friend. i never had the privilege of nelson mandela myself. but like so many people, i had.t feel as if i he clearly made a huge impact to meet. those he did i remember patty once telling me -- he told me this with a wife, jane, would say mandela was the funniest and she'd ever g man met. as a student, i flooded to for the free m nelson mandela concert to mark his 70th birthday. tood there, i remember thinking, how on earth could one an live up to everyone's expectations if and when he was finally released? nelson a free man, mandela not only met those expectations, he surpassed them. challenge for south africa seemed almost impossible at the time. how could people who'd spent so and divided in conflict either perpetrated or suffered so much abuse find it within forgive, to move on, and to build something together. well, mandela could and did. and the truly remarkable example forgiveness he set made it possible for his country to be as the rainbow nation. enormity r, given the of his achievements, we're all struggling to work out the best legacy.onor his i like to think one of the things he would like us to do in to pay se today is tribute to and support the ndividuals and the organizations around the world and fight for human rights do not have a global name. all over the world, millions of men, women, and children struggling to overcome and ty, violence, discrimination. they do not have the fame or the nelson mandela. but i'm sure he would tell us in they achieve and endure their pursuit of an equal and open society shapes all of our lives. campaigners like mayor kwame who works to protect and empower the afghanistan, the head of the human rights commission theorganizations and around world like the committee and relationships that works in the shadow of threats and intimidation. they are just three examples of the individuals and deserve our that loyalty and support just as much as the british campaigners in in anti-apartheid movement london showed unfailing loyalty nelson ort towards mandela in his bleakest days. i would also in that like to pay fellow to all of the at aigners for what he did the time. make what we ll mark tomorrow. and britain can pay no greater nelson mandela than by standing up around the world for the values of human rights he fought for. the nelson mandela took first steps for freedom, he made no call for vengeance, only forgiveness. he understood that dismantling apartheid's legacy was about removing the most explicit signs of discrimination and segregation. recognized too to build a brighter future, south africa must confront the darkness of its past. nelson mandela laid down a blueprint making it ossible for other communities such as in northern ireland to reject violence, overcome their ifferences, and make a fresh beginning. that's why i hope in communities where people are still truggling to replace violence and conflict with peace and stability. he principles of forgiveness and reconciliation which mandela embodies are followed by others too. recently, for example, we debate in this house the alleged human lanka, abuses in sri surely there could be no better way for that country to heal its bring peace and unity for all of its people than to follow mandela's example and south africa's truth and reconciliation process. nelson i see it is mandela's last egg legacy to all of us, to champion the defenders today.n rights and to know that wherever there's conflict and injustice courage, peace is always possible. minister reminded us, in the 1964 trial, mandela equality in d that south africa is an ideal for which he is prepared to die. to those listened words can fail to be moved to hear a man so explicitly, so put his life on the line for freedom. others remarked, mandela liked to repeat the great of the moral art universe is long, but it bends to moral justice. rights day 's human and beyond, let us mon nowhere is memory by ensuring that the hope he gave lives on for all of those whose liberties and rights denied.l gordon brown. >> mr. speaker, 51 years ago, directly across from this house, standing ent square, lincoln of the statues, and general schmaltz and with is friend oliver tanbull, nelson mandela asked the question -- when if ever would a represented in that parliament square? that day in june in 1962 was an important one. the first visit to london and possibly his last. because he was on the edge of arrested, imprisoned, put on trial twice, once for his then spent 27 years incarcerated. it was a great privilege on what have of the people of that i was able to a statue to the irst black man represented on that square, nelson mandela himself in the presence of his wife.dela and elson mandela stand there now and forever. his hands outstretched but his finger pointing upwards as he always did to the heights. man most responsible for the of what people thought was indestructible, the system, the man who taught us no injustice could last forever. greatest mana, the of his generation, yes, but across the generations, one of you ost courageous people could ever hope to meet. winston churchill said courage the greatest trait of all. pon courage everyone else depended. commitment, passion, wit, and charm. but it was his courage that things to of these life. we think of it as daring and bra stra doe and it's all of the things that mandela had in qualities. but mandela was the first to say true courage depends not just on of will power, but strength of belief. what drove mandela forward and architect of ahe free south africa, the one and irst great achievement of nelson mandela? what made him this great south africa ree was this burning belief that everyone, every man and woman was equal. everyone born to be free. everyone created not with the poverty, but in created to have dignity in life. >> here here. the intensity to which nelson mandela believed this and his determination that he would paralyzed by fear. something that's recorded was brought to the prison in robin island, the shakespeare and he has e his signature, julius he words of ceasar. the coward dies 1,000 times the volumedeath, but taste of death but once. it's strange seeing that death, end, will come when it will come. remarkably, that amazing courage to stand up to evil stood with this lack of bitterness that has been described already today, orgiving his prosecutors the would be executioners and the he told ing story that me, the night before they left rison calling all of the prisoners together saying, yes, they would be justified in acts f revenge, retaliation, and retribution, but there could never be a strong successful society.ial that's the second great achievement to achieve change in reconciliation. there was a third achievement, refusing to rest or relax when presidency, he had a great historic far most to his dged achievement name. he himself wrote in the first part of his life he had climbed mountain to end apartheid, but in the later life, he wanted to climb another the world ain to rid of poverty and especially the poverty.f child i need speak of what i saw in the times i worked with him. how quietly without fanfare, he went about his work. south africa to meet nelson mandela to persuade so that he to london could persuade the need for debt relief to relieve poverty. this, he did. in 2006, his wife, a leader in right, who shared his ideal, someone who will now arry on his legacy to the future. he and she launched the british for education for every child. he warned us when we had that mozambique, ence in he said to get every child to school, we would have to end hild labor and child marriage and child trafficking and we would have to end the discrimination against girls that he and his wife have been involved in ever since. nelson mandela, at the beginning of his conference said the cause was so rgent, they have now come out of retirement so that he could prosecute the cause. and at the end of the press onference, he said it's now up to the younger generation and he was returning to his retirement now. i visited in south his son he week that died of aids. in mourning and grieving about he events, he came out to the press with me and he said that ids is not to be treated as a moral judgment. like what he ated a disease and greatness for cure. his greatness was a greatness of the human soul. mrk, my good fortune was to meet nelson mandela not so long after he left prison. i remember the first greeting. of the british empire. he flashed the same smile that could light up a room and the world. years ago, the birth of my son john, i picked up the nelson e, there was mandela on the floor. he, too had lost a child in infancy. and his birthday before the day second son's, we exchanged telephone calls on the days of birthdays, presents, letters, cards, the last only this october. raising money for children's causes was the purpose of nelson birthday party in london when president clinton and i were proud to pay tribute gave an auction where he the original copy of his famous letter to a child. nd first oprah winfrey bid for it. then elton john. both surpassed a million. winfrey went beyond. she was told she would have to pay in pounds and not dollars. [ laughter ] nd nelson mandela and i joked it was time for another million pounds and write another letter send it to elton john. his last event was in hyde park london again to raise funds for children. sitting next to me, uniquely incapable of doing is to explain who the celebrity acts are and about.hey were and he was particularly intrigued by amy winehouse, longer with us. going down to meet him and her joking that her husband and mandela had a great common, both spent a huge amount of time in prison. t that point, she wanted a drink. they had banned drink at the occasion for him because of the health. i will never forget this mandela all of the achievements behind him, but the celebration party urely entitled to celebrate hiding from his wife's view the just for him.agne few people know that nelson loved not only to tell stories but to gossip. verything from spice girls, celebrities in sport, to political leaders, i will refeign to mention what he said about them. he admired and respected her majesty, the queen. wanted the me he queen to invite an african wane reception in is buckingham palace and got the diplomatic hannels so he decided to telephone her personally. these are only words that mandela could use. elizabeth. the juke, the official minutes say the queen was noncommittal, he got his way. hung by mandela on the bare of that bleak prison cell was a facsimile of a british artist, by famous frederick walls. it's the haunting image that he ad in his prison cell of a blinded girl sitting on top of the globe of the world. and the painting entitled, "hope," it's a the boldness of a irl to believe that even when blinded, even with a broken harp still string, she could play music. her and mandela's belief that and in the most difficult bleak of times, even when things eemed hopeless, there could still be hope. i believe that explains why over few days we both mourn the death of mandela and equal ted his life with intensity. unite the world in sport with unanimous applause. we are mourning because even in disasters, amidst the evil that existed in the world, there was someone there standing between us and the represented goodness and nobility. because ebrating today the lessons we learned from them will live on. teaches us that indeed no injustice can last forever. teaches us that when ever good people of courage come infinite there is hope. >> here here. malcolm rifkin. release in ay of his 1990, i was with many millions of people for him to emerge from prison. and i remember a particular hought at that time -- that although he was a global figure, the whole world knew of nelson mandela, no one had the faintest idea what he looked like. no picture had appeared. to prison 27 years earlier as relatively young man emerging as a relatively old man of 73. when hem the first time came to 10 downing street when john major was prime minister as he went to downing street, and number ten, 70 who staff of number ten, or 80 people quite spontaneously ad drawn themselves up in two lines in order to applaud him as cabinet room.he john major said that was the first time that had happened minister.ecame prime he was not a saint as we heard, politician to the fingerprints, he believed with the armed struggle of the earlier part of his career and perhaps in some degree to the his career. indians, see, he eventually decided the ways of more likely to deliver than the armed struggle. have dinner g to with the deputy prime minister. communist. african he had been educated at the economics.ol of he was a strong believer of the armed struggle. you're a member of the south african party. ften argued at the time that you and your people, your colleagues were training in the was it true? he said it was true, we were trained in odessa. in the armedelieve struggle? particularly nelson mandela decided on a political solution. we believed that the giver rikanas would never up peacefully. it would only be a struggle to power.em out of he said, no, is that what they taught you in the soviet union? said, no, that's what they taught me at the lse. lived and worked in southern africa in two years in the rhodesia.hern row i got to know south africa well. would be no there peaceful resolution of apartheid. hether one liked it or not, it would be revolution, by armed struggle, they would change that political system. and i was wrong. but i was wrong because what not one was there was hero in south africa, there were two and it's worth remembering this. nelson mandela who undoubtedly deserves the bulk of the credit. but there was the south african president, f.w. declercq. would both of them, it not have been a peaceful resolution. some ways it was more difficult for declercq than mandela. serious point. mandela was receiving power -- mandela was receiving power of the that stage most struggle had already been won. he was receiving power, declercq was having to persuade his own people to give it up and to give up before he had actually been defeated. a different ituation which the world had not seen before. declercq realized he needed the although elected not at that were white time. he called the referendum, by the leadership, f his he persuaded 60% of white south the daysto accept that of apartheid were over. even then, it required mandela credit to go through long months of negotiation, not only with the support of his in the enc in order to deliver not just a transfer f power, but the transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all of the people of south africa. said this is not about moving from white to black, domination.d be no he didn't just believe that, he ofcticed it with every fiber his being. as we look to what are the lessons of his extraordinary incredible achievements, if you look at not just the contribution in south saying but without the contribution to the wider world and why he's become such world as figure in the a whole, essentially there are two reasons for that. of all, he is perhaps the best example we've 100 years of how the force of personality, how political leaders who themselves from oliticians to statesmen can by their sheer personal effort hange the world and make what was impossible to possible and then deliver it. he's not the only one who has done so. think of it as a unique example. the force of his personality helped to end the old war and deliver the distribution of eastern europe without a shot being fired if thought that possible. built up the solidarity and once mighty polish communist party. nwar sidot, a controversial figure, but by the extraordinary decision he took to fly from jerusalem and address the egyptian president which led between israel and and, we knowr day, burma.being done in call it a political and charismatic figure in itself is sufficient.ut not it has to be combined with political skill, and, of course, politician to his being a ints a well as man with all of these other talents. tells ond lesson i think us is that you need political leadership. also as mandela did recognize the strength of getting as a way of political change. because even after mandela had released, it took months and months of negotiation that collapsed at any stage into internal civil war. year when we have seen howdy mroem si which is not produced the able agreement on syrian chemical weapons, produced an agreement iran's nuclear program, it's orth taking comfort from that and seeing how mandela's example can deliver in an extraordinary way. i conclude by simply saying this -- when we paid tribute to wele rightly , as do, we should pay tribute to him for what he himself stood for. we should acknowledge what he south africa, but also recognize what he taught regard to the resolution of what seemed like political problems by patients, by personality, by diplomacy.d by military solution armed struggle sometimes unavoidable. it is avoidable and he demonstrated that better than anybody in our own time. peter haven. >> can i thank the deputy prime leader of the e opposition for their overgenerous remarks in my role underline that there were many, many tens of thousands of activists in the anti-apartheid movement who deserve to be acknowledged as well. you, mrk, for your personal leadership in ensuring tribute. debate is a special event for such a special person. the south re wearing african tie on this occasion. specifically, for proposing thursday afternoon westminster all event for civil society along with the speaker including importantly veteran activists of anti-apartheid movement who worked so tirelessly over many tough and bitter decades for nelson mandela's release nd for the sanctions against partheid that he wanted and triggered his freedom. mr. speaker, i've never been in nelson mandela was mine from when i was a young in our retoria, unique relatives as well and having welcomed everybody to their house in the anti-apartheid struggle. one fellow activist i remember remarked, this is the first time i've ever come through the front man's house.te blacks acting asker is vapts or gardiners might be allowed in door occasionally. y daughter was often alone in the white only section of the public gallery in the 1962 trial pretoria. a would acknowledge her with clinched fist which she would return. his beautiful wife, winnie, each day, e trial often magnificent in tribal dress. once winnie bent down and kissed he two blond girls to the evident horror of the on looking white policeman. kissing two little white children disgusted them. before that, and he had the appointment with the prime minister which was very carefully became a global celebration with a pulsating free mandela anti-apartheid rock concert attended by 100,000 people at wembley stadium and watched on live television by 600 million worldwide. despite, i say for the record, mr. speaker, not out of any recrimination some conservative members pressing for the bbc to pull the plug on its coverage. and then almost miraculously was something we had never dreamed. we'd dreamed of, but deep down doubted would ever, ever happen. that historic day in february 1990 when he walked out of prison to freedom, an image forever imprinted on me and on millions, perhaps even billions across the world. i say almost miraculously because history gets compressed and rewritten over time, and we take change more granted. for granted. the reality was very different. nelson mandela's struggle for flee.com and that of his national african congress was long, and and it was bitter taking nearly 100 years from the days that under british colonial rule the roots of apartheid were established. under britain, under britain in 1900 50 years before apartheid was formally institutionalized in south africa, most of apartheid's features were already in place in the bustling gold rush city of johannesburg. by then africans were already prevented there walking on the pavements, they were to walk in the streets, had to carry passes to work in the city, could not use buses and and trains designated for whites, were dreadfully exploited in the mines and had no political rights. we all say in britain we were against apartheid, and doubtless we were. but some did things about it, others didn't. the anti-apartheid struggle was for most of its life engaged in a big fight here in britain too. its executive secretaries, first ethel kaiser, its chairman, lord bob hughes and treasurer, richard cayborn, former members of this house, were real stalwarts and neil kin nick along with -- [inaudible] as well. protests to stop whites-only tours provoked fierce anger. i remember it well. [laughter] pain to payne, as i recall. some people might still feel that. [laughter] yet nelson mandela confirmed to me that the isolation was a key factor in making whites realize that they had to change so that today that wonderful black rugby star, brian, can be a spring -- [inaudible] when his predecessors under apartheid at the time we were demonstrating never could. demands for trade and economic sanctions were also relisted, yet their partial implementation progressively not by london, but by washington, eventually helped to pell the white business -- propel the white business community in the late 1980s to demand change from the very same apartheid government from which they had so long benefited. mr. speaker, forgive me if for a brief moment i strike what i hope won't be seen as too discordant a note on this occasion which sees the house at its very best coming together to salute a great man. were it not for the interventions in the media in recent days, i'd have let pass the historical record. i dui credit especially to you -- give credit to you especially, mr. speaker, that you were on the wrong side of the anti- apartheid struggle as a young conservative. i give credit to the prime minister for apologizing for his party's record of what i have to describe as craven indulgence towards apartheid's rulers. and if nelson mandela can forgive his oppressors without forgetting their crimes, who am i not to do the same for our opponents in the long decades of the anti-apartheid struggle? when it really does stick in the craw when charles moore and others still tried over recent days to say their complicity somehow brought about its end. [laughter] even to my utter incredulity when the lord told bbc world this a debate with me that they had brought about mandela's freedom. [laughter] i know for a fact that nelson mandela did not think so. [laughter] on every possible opportunity, he went out of his way to thank anti-apartheid activists across the world for freeing him and his people. it's, therefore, especially welcome that nelson mandela always retained an almost our special series focuses on rosalynn carter. a discussion of cybersecurity and the financial markets. we will rear air but -- we will re-air the british house of commons on nelson mandela. another thing is you are going to be criticized no matter what you do. i would have been criticized for what i did, and i got a lot of criticism, but you learn to live with it. i never let it influence me.
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:30pm EST
man. >> for 18 of the 27 years he spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of that walk there was no freedom, there was this. >> reporter: with bob simon on the moment he was free. >> after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the south african government announced today that the state funeral for former president nelson mandela will be a week from sunday-- the culmination of days of memorial services. president obama will lead the u.s. delegation and he's invited the former american presidents to join him. mourners continued to gather today at mandela's home in johannrg died last night and at his former home in soweto. and for us, no one image captured his legacy better than this-- blacks and whites side by side honoring the father of a multiracial south africa. a man who became a worldwide symbol for racial equality. deborah patta is there. >> reporter: the streets of south africa were a riot of color, an explosion of song
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 1:40am PST
africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. i got to tell you, being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socio-economic levels, they're talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half-hour. >>> another major headline this morning, the investigation into the shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south central u.s., blanketing arkansas, oklahoma and tennessee. here
ABC
Dec 7, 2013 12:35am EST
. from nelson mandela's epic struggle to his long walk to freedom. "nightline" was there every step of the way. >> tonight, nelson mandela. >> tonight the freedom fighter you may not know. >> you were a good boxer? >> well, i do not know, that is the hardest to say. >> i am -- >> leading man. what do ebri alba, morgan freeman, danny glover, and sydney portier have in common? they all played nelson mandela on the big screen. >> and this boy's courageous journey inspired nelson mandela, and enkozi johnson, packed arenas and captured a nation's heart with his simple message. >> we are all the same. >> announcer: >>> good evening. thank you for joining us. tonight, we bring you a different kind of story about nelson mandela who died yesterday at 95. it is already saturday morning in south africa, and overnight his flag-draped coffin began its journey back to his ancestral home to be buried. but long before he became a global father figure, when mandela was locked for decades in a prison cell, a loan l lone voice, protesting brutal racial policies. this broadcast made a commitment to cover
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 2:35am EST
the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the streets of benghazi. despite threats. he chose to stay and teach high school chemistry. his wife and son had come home to texas for the holidays and he planned to join them next week. >>> check out that emirates airlines jumbo jet trying to land in strong winds yesterday in birmingham, england.
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
special edition of "cnn newsroom" as we remember the life and legacy of nelson mandela. first breaking news in the last hour, brand new jobs report is out with the lowest unemployment rate in five years. we'll tell you how the markets and the white house are responding this morning. >>> also an arctic blast, this is dallas, where the mercury has dropped 50 degrees in just the last 24 hours. colossal ice storm putting on the freeze from texas to tennessee. and in johannesburg, remembering the man who went from prisoner to president, we'll have the latest on funeral plans for the anti-apartheid icon, nelson mandela. >>> first to that breaking news on the economy, americans are getting back to work, 203,000 jobs were added to payrolls in november, and the unemployment rate ticked two notches lower to 7%. that's the lowest unemployment rate in five years. our chief business correspondent christine romans is here to break down the numbers. better than expected, so should we feel absolutely completely good about this? >> i saw some broad-based strength in these numbers from warehous
CBS
Dec 6, 2013 5:30pm PST
. >> for 18 of the 27 years he spent in prison, nelson mandela walked down this corridor everyday and at the end of that walk there was no freedom, there was this. >> reporter: with bob simon on the moment he was free. >> after 27 years, his head was high and his fist was clenched. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, the south african government announced plans today for a week of memorial services for nelson mandela, culminating with his funeral a week from sunday. president obama will lead a u.s. delegation, expected to include a number of former presidents, though it is not known which of the services he will attend. mourners continued to gather today at mandela's home in johannesburg where he died last night and at his former home in soweto. perhaps no one image summed up his legacy better than this. >> blacks and whites signed by side honoring the father of a multiracial south africa, a man who became a worldwide symbol for racial equality. >> debra patta is there. dance today. from the sprawling township of soweto t
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm PST
people. at the time nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc opposing apartheid had been organized as non-violent resistance. but after sharpville, they decided maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville they decided they would form a paramilitary wing and nelson man delg la was one of the anc leaders who went undergroutd to help it. they would target infrastructure and try to sabotage the state. after sharpville the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the a nchnc. they made it illegal to be a part of that group. nelson mandela was arrested in 1961, again in 1962 and convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on robben island. while he was already serving that sentence they put him on trial again, this time for sabotage. and they convicted him, and they sentenced him to life in prison, to life on robben island. so in 1964 he began a new sentence that was a life sentence, and for the first 18 years of it his cell on robbe
LINKTV
Dec 9, 2013 5:30am PST
parliament is paying tribute to nelson mandela as the country prepares for the arrival of world leaders were tuesday's memorial. these are the latest in a just from parliament. some 70 heads of state are expected to attend the service a stadiumo be held in in soweto. it is expected to be one of the largest gatherings of the carries in recent history. we have the latest on the ongoing prayers and tributes to nelson mandela. >> tributes continue to pour in for nelson mandela. south africans are still toiting places significant nelson mandela. the focal point is nelson mandela's home in soweto. grand parade in cape town, where nelson mandela made his first speech in 1990 as a free man when he walked out of the gates of the present. there will be a big rally in soweto in johannesburg. a number of dignitaries and eminent people along with about 95,000 south africans will pay tribute to their beloved leader. this afternoon, they will convene a special joint sitting of parliament to allow members of parliament and opposition parties to say farewell to the man who was south africa's first democ
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
, he belongs to the ages. >> what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek. >> good evening from washington. in its own way is in a state of mourning tonight. nelson mandela was historic figure, inspiration and role model for africans, south africans, but americans as well in our own troubles racial history and struggle to overcome that mirrored to americans in the life and the struggle and the suffering and then the triumph and the leadership of nelson mandela whose passing at 95 was noted by his successor, south african president, jacob zuma. >> yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. and in him, we saw so much of ourselves. >> reporter: one of those who says he was especially inspired is american president, barack obama, who shared his reaction a few moments ago to the passing of south africa's first black president. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, gave me a sense of what human beings can do when guided by hopes and
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 6:30am PST
generations. nelson mandela has died after a long battle with the recurring not long in the us at the age of ninety five. thank you so much for joining us for fools think i'm only home this friday people around the world are paying their respects to nelson mandela the ninety five year old died thursday evening at his home in johannesburg was battling a reoccurring a long illness. mandela had been receiving intensive care at his home in this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela was both inspirational and controversial. kyle brown takes a look back now the life of the us mandela when the former trend state eritrean july eighteen nineteen eighteen. nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief. just like his father. instead he became an aliya in the first thought legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the african national congress korean sea in nineteen forty four. apartheid was introduced for use later. his practice monday that was exposed to the new manatees of apartheid on that day basis. and he decided to fly back to the norm finances
Univision
Dec 5, 2013 6:30pm PST
ellos es nelson mandela, hablar de nelson mandela es hablar de unas de las personas más importantes, es que él vencio el racismo, paz en la tumba de un hombre ejemplar. >> desde muy joven se distinguio por sus ideas diferentes, renunció al derecho hereditario, nelson mandela obtuvo su título de abogado en 1942, dos años más tarde entró a un movimiento de lucha contra la opresión de negros africanos, en 1948 llegó al poder de sudáfrica un partido que propugnaba la segregación, en 1962 fue arrestado con 150 compañeros y condenados a cadena perpetua y estuvo 27 años en prisión, mandela lideró a su partido en las negociaciones para conseguir una democracia, en las primeras elecciones democráticas nelson mandela ganó la presidencia, en su país era conocido como madiva, recibió más de 250 premios y reconocimientos internacionales entre cuadro décadas e incluso el pnp premio nóbel de la paz. >> también logró una reconciliacion entre los distintos grupos étnicos. >> una de sus últimas intervenciones fue en el mundial de sudáfrica. >> nelson mandela es uno de los pe
CBS
Dec 7, 2013 6:30pm PST
bundles. rethink possible. >> pelley: moments after word came thursday evening that nelson mandela had died at his home in johannesburg, mourners started flocking there to stand vigil, though they did not stand still. there were tears, but there was song, as well. it was fitting that mandela's life was celebrated in song; music was a key part of that life. jazz master and cbs news contributor wynton marsalis gives us a listen to the soundtrack of a revolution. ♪ >> marsalis: nelson mandela's lifelong fight for freedom in south africa had a secret weapon: music. ♪ one of the masters of that music, and a man who knew nelson mandela, is legendary horn man hugh masakela. we got together to remember mandela and the music that propelled a people's revolution. ♪ i was honored to join him in playing "nkosi sikelel' iafrica," the south african national anthem. ( playing "nkosi sikelel' iafrica" ) >> marsalis: the story of nelson mandela-- in jail for such a long time, comes out to lead the country-- what was the perception of mandela when he was in jail? were you aware of him and what he
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am EST
nelson mandela. >> it has been almost 20 years trying to bring about a global trade deal. the world trade organization has come up with an agreement said to be worth $18 trillion for the international economy. >> it is so agreed. >> the deal was made in bali and indonesia, aimed at increasing global commerce and making it easier for poorer countries to do trade. >> for the first time in our history we have truly delivered. we have achieved something significant. people all around the world will benefit from the package delivered here today. >> here is what is it could mean. it's claimed it will create 21 million jobs, 18 million in developing countries and cut red removing the need for many taxes and bribes. the w.t.o. is trying to remove all subsidies. the deal means that some developing countries can keep them in they are needed to feed the poor. the results are yet to be seen. india is happy it can keep its subsidy. >> i view this as a victory for the farmers of india, for the farmers, for subsistence farmers of the entire developing country. there has also been a coalition of de
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 11:00pm EST
>>> tonight, the world is reacting to the death of nelson mandela. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> millions are gathering to celebrate his life and legacy. >> like a grandfather, you know. he's the father of the nation. >> for my generation, he's a leader we've all looked up to. >> good evening. he was a former boxer who would spend most of his long life fighting for freedom, renouncing violence and fighting for sgrus just. nelson mandela would become one of the world east most iconic figures. >> he was later elected president of south africa. he died today at the age of 95, but his legacy lives on. at howard university dozens gathered for a candle light vigil in his memory. outside of northwest d.c. tonight, people are leaving flowers and talking about his impact. president obama called mandela one of the most influential, a courageous and profoundly good men that ever lived. >> i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison, it gave me a sense of whatans ca they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> to honor
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 4:00am EST
as news spreads of nelson mandela's death. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with o this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> this morning we'll take you to south africa and look at the man who spent so much of his life behind bars, yet his words and actions continue to have a profound impact around the world. >>> and in other news, much of the u.s. braces for a major winter storm with snow, ice and plunging temperatures cutting across the country. "early today" starts right now. >>> good morning. i'm mara schiavocampo. he's being remembered as a man who changed the world. nelson mandela being mourned around the globe today. from a small prison cell, he rallied a nation. his long walk to freedom inspired hope in millions and his humility helped to revolutionize south africa. >> his tire rsless struggle for freedom and the respect of the world. >> his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> we sho
Al Jazeera America
Dec 10, 2013 3:00am EST
>> saying farewell to nelson mandela. world leaders and we'll wishers gather for a huge memorial service. >> from al jazeera's headquarters in doha. also - two french soldiers killed in the central african republic. >> riot police scuffle with protesters in ukraine as the president tries to find a solution. >> a water deal truck between three neighbours to breathe new life into the dead sea. >> good to have you with us. thousands of people started to arrive in johannesburg for a memorial service for nelson mandela. more than 70 world leaders are scheduled to attend the event. these are live pictures from inside the stadium where the service will take place. earlier on we see some world leaders arriving, including some african leaders. the stadium has 95,000 states, there are 80,000 expected. the weather has been poor. it's windy, and they are dancing and joyfully singing to remember nelson mandela. now, the service itself is expected to include tributes by south african president jacob zuma. and u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon. i'm joined by haru mutasa in soweto. it's a sombr
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 3:00pm PST
our continuing coverage on the passing of nelson mandela. reverend? >> thank you, ed. and tonight, grief in south africa and america and around the world. for nelson mandela. one of the towering figures of this century and the last one. an inspiration for billions of people across the globe has passed away at the age of 95. tributes are pouring in from across the globe for this freedom fighter. this man of peace who helped free south africa from apartheid and inspired citizens of all nations. president obama spoke just moments ago. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. for now let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. may god bless his memory and keep him in peace. >> mandela spent nearly a third of his life as a prisoner of apartheid, b
NBC
Dec 6, 2013 5:30pm PST
celebrating nelson mandela in the streets of south africa and across the globe. special coverage tonight including our conversation with former president clinton. >>> also this evening, the dangerous storm heading across a huge part of our country. tens of millions of americans in its path and another right behind it. >>> great expectations. after a surge in jobs, unemployment drops to its lowest level in five years. a work in progress, but can it be sustained? >>> and once in a lifetime. mandela's visit to this country. those who were there reflect on the power of that moment in time. "nightly news" begins now. >>> good evening. in london last night they chose to wait until the end of the premiere of the film "long walk to freedom," the story of nelson mandela, before breaking the news to the audience that nelson mandela had died. it brought a stunned reaction from the crowd which included prince william and his wife kate. the evening had been hosted by two of nelson mandela's daughters. and while the entire world knew this day was coming and the life of this 95-year-old man has
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am PST
, and in 1990, after 27 years in a cell, nelson mandela was released. four years later, voters of south africa, black and white, would go to the polls in if first democratic election in that country, and elect mandela their president with 62% of the vote. mandela set about what to do what seemed to be an impossible task, stitching together these two people, one oppressed, degraded for years, the other a minority, fearing they would be completely disempowered. in his inaugural speech, mandela stressed it would not be that way. >> and i enter a covenant to build a society in which all south africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall without any fear in their hearts. a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> mandela would transfer power after a five-year term and live to become the founder of a new nation, the living embodiment of its highest aspirations. joining me now is rohid. i cannot imagine the mood in south africa at this moment. >> it's a strange mood and it's very early in the morning here. so it's difficult to gauge the mood across the country.
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 2:30pm PST
. crowds take to the streets in so weto to remember their former leader. example nelson mandela has left for the rest of us to follow. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. since last night when the world learned of the death of former south african leader nelson mandela, the tributes have been flooding in. we learned from president jacob zuma that mandela will be given a full state funeral on sunday, december 15. the white house has confirmed president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa next week to take part in memorial services. we will have full coverage and area begin in johannesburg -- johannesburg. >> they come from all walks of life and all communities to pay respects outside the home of nelson mandela. the sense of bereavement is palpable. to some, almost private and personal. together,so a coming a nation united in mourning but also in celebration of the life of the man they call madiba. >> people are celebrating the life of nelson mandela. i think he would want us to celebrate his life. >> we kept holding onto that
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 2:00am EST
guided by the prepared to die for >> nelson mandela's family share their grief as the world mourns. president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa for nelson mandela's memorial service next week. >> hello, welcome no al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford live from new york city. reinforcements on the town in trying to end the violence. nearly 400 people have been killed in the fighting in the past three days. france is dispatching more than 1,000 troops and the african union plans to double its forces. 10,000 have fled the capital. officials ordered everyone off the streets of bangui. for the latest on the crisis we start in bangui. a warning - you may find some of these images disturbing. >> french soldiers on food patrol in bangui. this is new to the city and welcomeded by men. they are here to reassure people enough to open up shops. at the moment there's no food or medicine. there's little the french can do about the growing sectarian violence between muslims and christians. >> translation: we muslims have been here for 200 years. they are killing us every day.
CBS
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
. >> pelley: late today we learned of the death of nelson mandela, the man who lead south africa from apartheid to a multiracial democracy. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. >> pelley: from johannesburg. an american is gunned down in benghazi, libya. was it terrorism, bob orr is covering. snow, ice and bitter cold stretch across half the nation. manual bojorquez on what it is hitting and where it is going. and the special bond between two presidents. we'll talk to bill clinton about his friend nelson mandela. >> we could have had the politics of resentment. he chose the politics of inclusion. se the politics of captioning sponsored by cbs ptioning sponsored this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. with s >> pelley: good evening. he changed the world. you can't say that about many people. but you can say that about nelson mandela. the man who lead south africa's peaceful transition out of apartheid and became the country's first black president. he died today at the age of 95. mandela had been battling a lung infection for many months. right after its offi
MSNBC
Dec 10, 2013 2:30am PST
sensitive way, preparations have been under way for quite some time for the death of nelson mandela, but, of course,, things, you know, many things are d put into action he in these last severalma days, including accrediting the massive contingent of press from all around the world, wiring the stadium, coordinating all the satellite technology, and weather has been an issue here. we had issues earlier in the week with the steady rain, but i think it look it's like you're getting a clearer picture now. so we'll let you go back now to hear them speak. >> lester, thanks. things have cleared up a little bit. >> -- my heart, my soul, my life and those of millions of south africans and continue to touch many lives in the world. [ cheers ] i'm overjoyed by the outpouring of love and adulation extended today. madiba is looking down on us now and there is no doubt smiling as he watches his beloved country unite to celebrate his life and lega legacy. [ inaudible ] [ broken audio ] >> we are again experiencing some hits as we call hthem in te signal, the thickness of the clouds is disrupting the sa
MSNBC
Dec 10, 2013 1:00am PST
gathered for the official remembrance of nelson mandela and the first reference of what will be many all day as our coverage continues of this memorial, and that is the absolutely miserable weather. we feel mostly for all the folks who have filled what is the largest stadium in the continent of africa, 95,000 give or take capacity. this hugely built for the world cup soccer in 2010, and most of the spectator areas are covered, and there's a tremendous premium put on seats for the people, and we talked a lot about the dignitaries, but this is an opportunity for the people to come and remember the life of nelson mandela. all day long we will be showing these pictures as they come to us from host television, south african television, and their cameras, there are many, and they are scanning the crowd, as you can see, and we will see many members of the mandela family, and many world leaders, and there has bench talk and speculation about the odd combinations between presidents and kings and a few sorted de dictators and criminals wearing suits, and a man who befriended them all, by the w
CSPAN
Dec 5, 2013 5:00pm EST
house next. president obama on the death of former south african residents nelson mandela. >> nelson mandela closed a statement from the dock saying, "i have fought against white domination and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die." nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today, he has gone home. we have lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. .e no longer belongs to us he belongs to the ages. dignity andfierce unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from imprisonment to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 1:00am PST
from around the world. stay ahead on cnn. . >>> remembering nelson mandela. the world mourning the loss of a legend morning. the south african president hailed for his courage, his conviction, his decency. i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. we welcome our viewers in the u.s. and arnold the world. >> this is a special edition of "early start" beginning this morning because the world is grieving and, in some ways, celebrating a giant among men. nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in arwa damon when is live in johannesburg in south africa. >> reporter: nelson mandela a hero, a legend, an icon. so many of the people we are speaking to here will say that hardly truly encompasses what it was that he meant for this nation and what it was that he allowed this nation to become. behind me is the ho
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 2:30am PST
am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living legend. we will not only honor mandela but put him in historical perspective on this friday edition of "way too early." goo shaqman on this december 6th. we begin with nelson mandela. it would have been ground breaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but he was so much more not only to his own country but all over the world. the long-time freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba as he was known sacrificed decades of his own life in prison in an effort to win his countrymen freedom from the bonds of apartheid. mourning and tributes as you might imagine pouring in throughout the night from harlem to his hometown of johannesburg, south africa. it is all for a man who was prepared, as you heard, to die to bring democracy to a country where for so long it wa
CNN
Dec 10, 2013 12:00am PST
respects to nelson mandela. and this soccer stadium that we are now having this memorial at, and that is actually now jacob zuma. this is the current president of south africa. jacob zuma arriving. of course, he will be delivering what is, i guess, referred to as a keynote address during this memorial service. at this soccer stadium, which has played so many moments during mandela's life. it seems fitting to have his memorial there. >> absolutely, john. there could not be a more fitting venue for this memorial service for nelson mandela. this is the site of nelson mandela's last public appearance. the closing stages of the 2010 world cup. that's when we saw him along with his wife on the back of a golf cart, if you will, wrapped up against the wall. scenes that touched the heart of many as they saw him. he looked frail. he was obviously advanced in his years. that was the last time we saw him in public in 2010. if you were to go back to time, this place behind me was also the scene of nelson mandela's first public speech. well, not first. the speech in the days after he was released. two
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 5:30pm PST
for watching. we appreciate your ♪ >>> this is "world news." tonight nelson mandela, his struggle and strength healed a nation and changed a world. >> i stand here before you not as a prophet but as a humble servant. >> from a tiny prison cell, he rallied millions against racism and injustice. his long walk to freedom a beacon of hope for generations. >> nothing will stop our date with destiny. >> tonight, the world mourns the passing of an icon. >>> and a good evening to al you. we welcome you to a special edition of "world news," beginning with breaking news. a titan of the century has died. nelson mandela, the man who taught the modern world you can transform anger into hope. he was 95 and it's not that his death was a surprise but his life continues to astonish us in a master class in living the possibility of a better world. he spent 27 years in prison for his belief in freedom, equality and emerged with a message of generosity toward his oppressors. we have reaction from around the world tonight. first "good morning america" anger robin roberts who has traveled to south afri
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 4:00pm EST
memory of that day in may 1994 when nelson mandela delivered a first address as president of south africa. now an opportunity for them to learn about the democracy path that was born at that time. >> the first step on this side, that side - it's got an emblem. the president sits there alone. this is where he has his own place. >> from the tour guide an anecdote demonstrating that the great can get it wrong. >> the former president was making is a speech in this house. once he was making a speech he noted a red button flicking next to him. he wanted to know what was going on. he had to stop and find out as to what was really going on. he was told, "mr president, you don't have to worry. no one is in danger. the reason that red light goes on is because you should have finished speaking a long time ago." >> underlying the better life that nelson mandela made. >> i think it is a big thing for me, that nobody would have done for me. >> i think he played a role, especially for the young people of today. he made a sacrifice for where we are today. there's a lot of opportunities that came
CBS
Dec 7, 2013 6:00pm PST
! >> viva! >> pelley: tonight, a man for a rebel, a prisoner, a president. nelson mandela is dead at 95. >> take your guns, your knives and throw them into the sea! >> pelley: a revolutionary who fought for liberty, an icon who embraced peace. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. he gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. >> he did something remarkable. he built a genuine multiracial democracy in south africa. >> pelley: he was an inspiration to all who cherish freedom. >> i cherish the ideal of a new south africa. >> the legacy of mandela is of forgiveness and reconciliation. >> today, we can proudly say we are all south africans. >> he is revered around the world. he is almost like a saint. >> pelley: for south africa, he was "madiba," the father of a nation. >> africa! amandla! ( cheers ) ( national anthem plays ) captioning sponsored by cbs >> pelley: good evening. sunday in south africa will be a national day of prayer in honor of nelson mandela, a day to
Al Jazeera America
Dec 6, 2013 11:00pm EST
-old american hs been released from korea. >>> a world without nelson mandela. >>> help wanted. a december surprise on the job front more companies are hiring but does that mean the country is turning around. >>> the luck of the draw. the world cup selection is set. the u.s. is facing some tough odds but don't count the team out. >>> and we begin with more news, breaking news out of north korea. american citizen merle newman has been frie freed after beingd bheldby north korea for a month. new dollarsman wags was te detaa sightseeing tour. melissa is live in san lan witht developmentses. developments. as you can imagine the family has been zpi distraught. the north korean's famously unpreictable. the u.s. state department had this statement. >> we are pleased that mr. newman has been allowed to depart from the dprk and rejoin his family zplmp. this positive decision shows the continuing detention of mr. bay who has been in dprk custody for over a year. the dprk the official name of north korea. vice president biden had comments about merle newman's release. >> it's a positive thin
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 8:00pm EST
. >> the family of nelson mandela makes its first statement since his death as the memorial grows for the antiapartheid leader. power outages and a travel nightmare. wintry weather spreads across the u.s. >> tonight a u.s. veteran is home with his family after being held in north korea for more than a month. merrill newman arrived in the 85-year-old was accused of committing crimes while he served in the korean war. his family called merrill newman's time in north korean's hands, "a very difficult ord eel", >> melissa chan has the story. >> when merrill newman made the trip, he would not have known how difficult it would turn out. after weeks of detention he's in the u.s., looking healthy, with his wife by his side and a simple message. >> it's been a great homecoming, and i'm tired, but happy to be with my family now. thank you all for the support. very much appreciated. >> merrill newman was a soldier in a korean war. his visit to pyongyang was a long-planned vacation down memory lain. he was no ordinarily soldier. the north koreans released this concession video, likely forced
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
today. >>> good morning. i'm chris jansing. this morning we remember nelson mandela. in life he united south africa and the world and his legacy as a fighter for freedom will continue to resonate well after his death. icon, legend, hero. none of those words seem quite big enough to describe a man who changed the world. ♪ and yet in the streets of johannesburg, the crowds are celebratory. south africa planning ten days of mourning. mandela's body will lie in state with leaders from all over the world expected to pay respects. here in the united states, flags are flying at half staff. mandela had a huge impact on president obama inspiring him to public service. the two only met once in 2005 when president obama was then senator obama. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> mandela spent 27 years behind bars for treason, for backing an anti-apartheid charter. he was finally released february 11, 1990.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 10, 2013 5:00pm EST
and thank you to nelson mandela in an emotional memorial service in a stadium in johannesburg. southern africa, home to some of the most important mineral deposits were racked by civil war pitting sides against each other. murdering political opponents at home and in exile. what south africa follow angola and mozambique in civil war with its large population and decades of bitterness, it created the potential of being the most dangerous of all. on this edition of "inside story" we'll be discussing nelson mandela and the process of negotiation that kept south africa from tearing each other apart. dignitaries, family, friends, and south africans of all color, thousands of mourner poured into the soccer stadium to celebrate the life of nelson mandela. >> to the people of south africa, people of every race and every walk of life, the world thanks you for sharing nelson mandela with us. his struggle was your struggle. his triumph was your try you tr. in through speeches both white and black south africans mourned around the country together. >> there is nothing that we can do more
PBS
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm PST
of nelson mandela brings a sense of loss around the world as people paid tribute outside his home in johannesburg. crowds take to the streets in so weto to remember their former leader. example nelson mandela has left for the rest of us to follow. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. since last night when the world learned of the death of former south african leader nelson mandela, the tributes have been flooding in. we learned from president jacob zuma that mandela will be given a full state funeral on sunday, december 15. the white house has confirmed president obama and the first lady will travel to south africa next week to take part in memorial services. we will have full coverage and area begin in johannesburg -- johannesburg. >> they come from all walks of life and all communities to pay respects outside the home of nelson mandela. the sense of bereavement is palpable. to some, almost private and personal. together,so a coming a nation united in mourning but also in celebration of the life of the man they call madiba. >> people are ce
NBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
>> announcer: the >>> the death of nelson >>> the death of nelson mandela. this is nbc nightly news with brian williams. we're back with more of our special coverage of the passing of nelson mandela who died today at the age of 95. as you might imagine, at this hour, reaction to his loss, is pouring in from around the world and the nation of south africa now begins a state of mourning. our south african-based correspondent is with us from outside the mandela family home in johannesburg. as we said in our first half hour, this is a nation many of whom went to bed last night who will be waking up tomorrow morning to hear this anticipated but still sad and shocking news. >> absolutely right, brian. anticipated. expected. predictable but painful nonetheless. as i look around, the crowds here have grown to maybe 400 or 500 people. mainly south africans who were born after the birth of democracy. the so-called born frees who have no memory of the darkest years of ar par tide. they are singing and celebrating his life rather than mourning his death because, of course, his death was not in
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 3:00am PST
leader and freedom fighter nelson mandela. >> here in the u.s. we're tracking a dangerous ice storm. forecasters saying it could be the worst ice storm ever for the region. people are waking up without power but millions could end up losing electricity for weeks, they fear, this as temperatures continue to plummet. >> we'll continue to what's going on but we want to react to the passing of nelson mandela. here's a live look at the crowds that have been gathered outside the late south african leader's home. they're singing, their dancing, nations, of course, showing their respect. flags around the world at the white house we'll show you, see it, half-staff. this morning, honoring the anti-apartheid leader's life and legacy. we'll follow the developments from every corner of the world. let's bring with robyn curnow. she's in johannesburg. >> the news came just before midnight south african time that nelson mandela had gone. so many south africans woke up to this stark, gut wrenching head line. this says "hamba kahle madiba." >> it was an announcement heard around the world. >> our bel
Al Jazeera America
Dec 7, 2013 2:00am EST
. >> now to the passing of nelson mandela. you are seeing live pictures where people from all over the world are gathering in johannesburg celebrating his life with dance, prayer and a photograph. it was a unique gift to bring people together even in death. >> nelson mandela dreamt of a rainbow nation. south africa is not present. this couple remembered the man called tata. >> to see this many people across - across borders and across races singing together and honouring an amazing man. >> we are here because of nelson mandela. we live the same life as other people. he was the greatest father in the world. >> during apartheid black south africans couldn't even walk the streets. now they come here to sing. old protest songs. [ singing ] >> they danced to songs about nelson mandela's life. he empowered them and the country to emerge from their laws. >> what have you taken from his leadership? >> unity. that's the most important thing. >> peace, reconciliation, that was the message, a message we have to teach our children and our children's children. >> this was not about sadness or mourn
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 11:00am PST
nelson mandela referred to and wanted his country to be behind you. tell me a little bit more about what we're hearing regarding the next few days and how this country, this world will pay its respects. >> lots of great stories. i think the plans have been in place for a while. they are really spread throughout south africa. we have that big gathering on tuesday that will be a memorial service in the stadium and holds tens and thousands of people. that will be an outpouring. and a number of world leaders are expected to attend that and not only the state funeral that will be on the 15th but even prior to the memorial service on tuesday, the president announced this coming sunday will be a day of prayer and people are encouraged to do things in their own homes. there's just something about this story that has extended over. decades that makes people want to go outside and just hang out here really. people haven't been staying all day. it's not one of those things that gathers too many people and then becomes unruly. it's that people want to show up and pass through and put some flowe
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 6:00am EST
mandela. crowds left flowers, photographs and balloons outside nelson mandela's home in johannesburg. a memorial service will be held on tuesday with president obama, george w. bush, and jimmy carter. the man defending nelson mandela's yisent is also speaking out. mike hanna sat with him to talk about the unique relationship. >> there was an excessive part of the government that get-nelson mandela in gaol, and he served under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
massacre at sharpville killed 69 people. at the time, nelson mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that
ABC
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am PST
. ♪ >>> and this morning, the world celebrates the life of nelson mandela. >> we have never doubted in our mind, even during the darkest hours of our struggle, that eventually we would win. >> he calls himself an ordinary man who became a leader because of extraordinary circumstances. >> sometimes it's calls for a nation to be great. let your greatness blossom. >> this morning, his life, his legacy. >> as long as injustice exists in our world, none of us can truly rest. >> we talk to the people whose lives he touched. this is a special edition of "good morning america," remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed the world. >>> we do say good morning, everyone. and we are celebrating the life of one of the most remarkable men in history. he has been called the apostle of reconciliation. a leader who inspired so many, with his own fight for freedom and justice for all. we have so many pictures that we're going to share with you. this, outside of his home in south africa. crowds gathering all around the world. tributes pouring in from around the globe this morning. >> 95 years old. a monum
PBS
Dec 10, 2013 2:30pm PST
nelson mandela. who of global power. nearly 100 world leaders flew into pay tribute, and president obama's eulogy captivated the audience. >> in the art of his life, we see a man who earned his place in history through struggle and shrewdness and persistence, faith. >> the french president arrived in the central african republic where to french troops have been killed trying to stop the escalating violence. welcome to our viewers on public television here in america and also around the globe. it may have been pouring rain in south africa today, but that did nothing to dampen the spirits of those who came out for a massive .emorial a wide array of world leaders joined with ordinary citizens in honoring the man who has just left such a rich legacy. tonight, we have all coverage of nelson mandela's memorial, and we begin with andrew harding. >> 5:00 a.m. on a cold morning where the dancing has already begun. they've been waiting half the night at the front of the queue. how iannot put into words feel. i'm over the moon. >> the forecast of rain has prompted some elegant designs. >> we
ABC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
are remembering nelson mandela, a man who changed this world. president obama saying just hours ago he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. at 95, his death not a surprise, but the lessons of his life still reverbrating around the globe, that long walk to freedom, brimming with humility, resilient, a determination to forgive. and there has been a huge outpouring of emotion, reaction from around the world tonight, our team there starting with abc's chief foreign correspondent terry moran who joins us right now from london. terry? >> reporter: it is a profound moment for south africa and really for the world, the marking of the passing of this remarkable man and of the end of an era in human grace and dignity. in south africa itself, in the neighborhood which was a segregated township where nelson mandela lived before he went to prison for 27 years and where he went home to. there is a combination of mourning, of sorrow and celebration and gratitude, people gathering outside of his home and dancing, celebrating the life of nelson mandela. reaction pouring in from around the w
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2013 2:00am EST
go watch is aus in >> president obama is reading a delegation to nelson mandela's memorial service that includes former presidents. the former president of south africa died last thursday. our coverage of the memorial will be on c-span2 tomorrow morning. we've also have live coverage of c-span radio and c-span.org. we will take your comments at #cspanchat and on facebook. british prime minister david cameron and other members of parliament celebrated the life of nelson mandela with a special tribute session. join 100 worldl leaders in johannesburg at the memorial service. >> order. order. know how will wish to we intend to proceed today. the questions will be persona until -- postpone until next monday. the present list will be carried over. the table office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day. a special tribute to a special statement -- nelson mandela. i hope that as many many -- as many members of possible can contribute. tributes may continue until 10 p.m. there will be no end of day adjournment debate. the house will also wish to know that there w
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 7:30pm EST
>> we 11ed just a few hours ago that nelson mandela had passed away. the at the time is still a shock, and it is a great shock. >> thank you for having us, and i want to send out condolences on behalf of the family. where condolences to the family, and also to the people of south africa. the biggest thoughts are trucage, humility, somebody's great vision, passion, for life. and they are not saying any minute to do good. i apologize for not calling it the right time, trance africa. what was it like to meet him? >> oh, everything that was more than -- and i knew it would be anxious, and excited and dealing with -- more tremendous then i have half. a meeting with him. and just anything that is said about him, even after the meeting you just multiply it even more. the man is a great leader, but with humility, somebody who was able to bring together many many different people together. >> also being able to articulate his prince. s. his passions. but at the sate time, being able to emphasize with others. and it takes this tremendous person to do that. so everything people are saying
CNN
Dec 6, 2013 2:00am PST
. >> incredible to see. "early start" continues right now. >>> remembering nelson mandela. this morning the world remembering that man, mourning the loss of a legend. south africa's former president hailed for his courage and decency and message of equality. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> i'm michaela pereira. it is 5:00 in the east. >>> nelson mandela whose unbreakable will and unsurpassed courage brought an end to an era of white domination in south africa. he is dead this morning at the age of 95. mandela was such a global icon with larger than life legend who went from a prison cell to the presidency and he did it with such unmashed grace. i want to bring in robin curnow live from johannesburg. set the scene for us today, robin. >> the announcement was made just before midnight on thursday. so many south africans didn't really know that their icon had passed on. it was only when they woke up this morning that they perhaps looked at the newspapers or heard on the radio. much of this country is quite rule countryside and they would have seen headlines like this.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 9:00pm EST
the wrights. joining us here in the studio, she helped to organize nelson mandela's first tour after he was released from prison, and it was really quite soon after his release, can you take us back to that moment? it is june of 1990, and america is seeing nelson mandela, how emotional was it here? >> it was really pan polonium. it was. i remember when the mayor described him as the modern day black moses, and i think that for me, being part of the first national u.s. tour, i felt like i got a chance to see america at its best, because new york in particular went crazy. >> there were thousands of people in the streets. >> there were an estimated hundreds of thousands of people. from his first appearance in brooklyn, to the motor kade, with cuomo down broadway. people were crying. >> there were people with bannering saying irish for mandela, everybody in their offices were out, it was just an amazing and exhilarating moment. and i think that the whole idea of mandela, obviously he is part of a lineage, not just in south africa, but in terms of the anti-clonian independent movement, in
CNN
Dec 10, 2013 1:00am PST
anderson cooper. we have live at fnb stadium where the world is gathering to remember nelson mandela. this is an impressive memorial service to get under way bringing the rich, powerful and the average citizen here to remember one of the largest gather is in history. some 90,000 people expected to be packing this massive stadium and it is fill up fast. a spot where mandela made his last public appearance three years ago, right after the world cup celebration, some 91 world leaders, sdig thdignitaries are. it's a rainy day but that is not stopping the crowds. 4:00 a.m. in the east. we welcome our viewers in the united states and watching around the world. i'm happy to be joined by christiane amanpour and robin curnow. for those who are watching at home and watching around the world, they should stay tuned. it is a treat to see that this is history in the making. >> it's really true. in the days since mandela died, you've had such an outpouring of sadness, but really it's been marked by the joyfulness and the celebration of his life. i think it's not too harsh to say we will probably not see
NBC
Dec 9, 2013 5:30pm PST
nelson mandela. nearly 100 heads of state, including four american presidents, descending on this country for a massive tribute to the man who changed the course of history. >>> also, the big story back home. a dangerous storm on the move. snow and i and rain. a nightmare on the roads and at the airport, hundreds of thousands in the dark and in the cold of. our coverage tonight of both stories. "nightly news" from south africa begins now. a >>> good evening. as we mentioned, a lot of news from back home in the u.s. tonight. we will get to it in just a moment, but we begin here this evening because it's the focus of so much of the world. this is the eve of what may be the largest gathering of heads of state ever, anywhere in the world. and of course, it's all for nelson mandela. he will come to lie in state at the union buildings behind us here in the capital city of pretoria. the outpouring has been so great since his death, the number of dignitaries arriving here is so large, this nation is going to be pushed to capacity in terms of crowd control and transportation and accommodat
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